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Olympia tribune. (Olympia, Wash.) 1890-1893, November 03, 1891, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085350/1891-11-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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OFFICIAL PAPER
o——-————OF——~——o ‘ ‘
The Cities of Olympia and Tumwater, and
g Thurston County. WWA
VOLUME n. NO. 162 >
S ' ger 85 White
WHPROPRIETORS GEL—«e—
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- ———~—-—MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN——~—~
el-DOORS, SASH AND BLINDs-e,
WRITE FOR ESTIMATES- ;
Corner of Third and Jefferson Street, Olympia]
w—
. E. S. HORTON
PLI IMBINGI STEAM
—ANI)—
GAS~FITTING. -
STOVES AND TINWARE,
REPAIRING- PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO
-424 Fourth Street. Telephone No. 13.
MILLARD LEMON, PRESIDENT. MARY L. PAGE, SECRETARY.
ROB’I‘. F. \VHI’IIIAM. TREASURER. F. G. BLAKE, MANAGER.
CAPITAL CITY
ABSTRACT It TITLE INSURANCE COMPAN Y:
(INCORPORATED) ..
‘ Draughting and Blue Printing. ”
Onr Abstracts are posted to date every evening, and are the only complete set of Abstracts from
Government to date in the county.
Upstairs!“ Chalubers Block - - - - olynlpla, “’nsh.
W
G- NOSCHKA,
Leading Merchant Tal lor.
--——A_lways keeps a full assortment of;
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS. PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED IN EVERY CASE.
REPAIRING NEATLY DONE.
T. J. MCBRATNEY
F ‘ “’D I W ‘
2
211 m . e werv agons,
Carriages, Buggies, Road Carts, Plows, Etc.
Agricultural Implements of Every Description.
COLUMBIA, NEAR FIFTH STREET-
C I‘NE W CASTLE C 1
——AND—
0a BUCODA 0a
The Best, Cheapest and Cleanest Fuel.
THOMAS HEAGOCK AND A. D. GLOVER, Exclusive Agents.
Dealers in all kinds of fuel. Orders left at R. FROST’S store will receive prompt attention.
W
’ G- U RNEY
r n rans er to
, CI a ,
Successors to FOSTER a: LABEREE.
We have added to our already large stock a FIRST-CLASS WAGON. specially fitted
for the removal of Pianos, Furniture and Baggage. Our facilities for the re
moval of safes and all other heavy ioods are 0 the best. All orders for
Hacks, Gurneys, Livery. Truc s,'Baggaie, stm, promptly at
tended to. A first-class boarding stale :1: connection.
CORNER MAIN AND THIRD ST.
Telephone Number 3.
C - BEARY,
' GENEEAL REPAIRING
CARTRIDGES LOADED TO ORDER. AMMUNITION OF ALL KIN DS.‘
- Silsby Block, Main Street, Olympia.
Em
I HA NED &BA TES
Undertakers and Funeral Directors
I Especial Attention Given to Embalming for Shipment.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT TEL. NO. ’7-
116 West Sixth Street.
STATE PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY
Book : and : Job : Printing : Specialties.
Northeast Corner of Fourth and Adams Street, Olympla, \Va‘shington.
€I.4YMPIA TRIBUNE
BLANK BOOKS
School : Books
among—LE Kinds.
Inks, Muoimgood—Wall Paper.
THE BIG BAZAAR!
W. A. V AN EPPS, PROP.
Headquarters for Everything.
WALL PAPER AND
Ceiling Decorations
Just received.
ROBER I‘ FROST
HEAVY AND .SHELF
HAR D W AR E.
——-—o— .
Wooden and willow ware, crockery and
glassware, guns pistols, rifles, all kinds of
ammunition, cement, paint. oils and win
dow glass.
OLM SE PIA.
Collegiate Institute
___._o_
“The Pioneer School of Washington.”
COLLEGE COURSE, per term, - sl2.
NORMAL COURSE, per term, - 12.
COMMERCIAL COURSE, per term, 13.
GRAMMER COURSE, per term, - 8.
MUSIC, per term, -
ELOCUTION, per term, - - 15.
STENOGRAPHY, per term, - - 10.
ART INSTRTCTION, per hour, - 250.
._.Q_._
The ofler of board, tuition and room rent for
$l5O per year in advance has already brought
about 75 students to Olympia from abroad. All
the priveleges and opportunities of the Institute
are open to the patrons of Oiympia i'or the price
of tultion alone .
A Faculty of nine Instructors and S3)eeialists,
completely furnished boarding an lodging
halls, literary and debating societies and thor
ough work in all departments are the advan
tages oli'ered. .
For further information call on or address ._ ~.»
REV. LUTHER GOVENG‘TON;
' PRESIDENT.
”M
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS.
G M. SAVAGE & CO.
I
CONTRACTORS.
Bridge Building and Pile Driving;
1 LIBER MAN ,
I
CONTRACTOR.
Grading and Bridging. Office: Room
8, Woodrnfl block.
“I A. ROGERS
. .
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Estimates made on application.
OLYMPIA - - - - - WASH.
J W. ROBERTS
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Office fittings counters, shelving and all
jobbing promptly attended to. Estimates
furnished on application. I’. 0. box 177.
OLYMPIA. WASH.
WEEKS & CO
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS.
‘ Plans and specifications furnished.
OLYMPIA AND TACOMA - ‘- - - WASH.
1 CARD & BROWN .
' l
GRADING AND EXCAVATING-. , \
Lot and land clearing done promptly,
Camp on Westside on Fourth and Front
streets.
OLYMPIA - - WASH.
M
'r' ‘ 1
—-—-AT—“
TUM W ATER.
_o__
THE TRIBUNE will be delivered to all
subscribers regularly, with fresh
telegraphic and coal news.
_____o_
'l‘“ m Water’s Official Paper.
....)
Leave all subscriptions and communica
tions with the TUMWATER DRUG 00.,
sole agents for the DAILY Arm WEEKLY
TRIBUNE.
NOTICE is hereby giwn that the firm of F.
C. Williams A: 00., heretofore doins bus
iness in the city of Olympia, County of burs
ton, and state of Washington, as Undertaken,
has been this day dissolved by mutual consent?
The said business will hereafter be conducted
in the name of F. C. Williams, he succeeding to
all of the interests of the firm, retaining all
Froperty of the firm paying all debts and col.
(acting all amounts dllc the firm of E C. Will
iams Co. Oct22-6t.
Dated at Olympia, Wash, this 21, of Oct. 1891
F. C. WILLIAMS & CO.
OLYMPIA. WASHINGTON. TEUSDAY. NOVEMBER 3, 189 i.
Notice of Dissolution.
VOTING ‘ TODAY.
News Fl'om All Parts of the Coun-
try About Electlons.
Both Parties Confident oi Victory.
How McKinley Voteduoleve
land’s Old Home Goes
Republican.
BOSTON, Nov. 3.——The weather is clear
and cold in all parts of the commonwealth
and all indications poiiitto polling a heavy
vote in the Massachusetts state election
today, .
NEW YORK, Nov. .3.—Election day in
this city opened bright and clear and re
ports from all parts of the state show the
weather favorable for a large vote. An un
usually heavy vote is reported from all
parts of the state. '
PITTSBURc, Nov. 3.—-—The election is pro
ceeding quietly, a bright day bringing out
a much larger vote than anticipated and
indications are that a full ,vote will be
polled. A peculiarity of the light lies in
the fact that the two old established politi—
cal parties, which are generally bitterly op
posed to each other, are working together
hand-in-hand for the state ticket against
a new movement known as the "straight
outs.
TOEEDO, Nov. 3,—The weather is cool
and the vote so far polled is very heavy.
The Australian system works smoothly
except in two or three large precincts.
A RELIGIOUS QUESTION:
OMAHA, Nov. 3,—The election is progress-
Ing very slowly, owing to the Austrailian
system, which is being used for the first
time. it requires from six to ten minutes
for voters to prepare their their ballots. As
aponsequence t e vote will probably be
light. Reports received up to noon indi
cate the republican state ticket in the lead.
The religious, question is playing a leading
role in the municipal contest, the Catholic
forces being pitted against the anti-Catholic
American Protective Association.
, FROM TIIE GORNFIELDS.
DEs MOINES, lowa, Nov. 3.——The interest
taken in the election here is intense. The
weather is raw and cloudy. A slight rain
is reported in the southwestern part of the
state, but it will not materially aflect the
vote. 111 the farming communities rain
will probably increase the vote, as it will
give the men an excuse to leave their corn
lields.
NEw YORK, Nov. 3.——Business is sus
pended in nearly all parts of the city. Dur
ing the morning everything(proceeded and
no disturbances was reports .
TIIIc AUsTRALIAN BALLOT.
CLEVELAND, 0. Nov. 3.—This is an ideal
election day, the weather being over cast
but too cool for rain. The Australian sys
tem which is being tried for the first time
today, brought out the voters early, and it
is thought by noon the bulk 'ol' the ballots
will be in, in many precincts.
CINCINNATI, Nov. 3.—-The weather is cool
and sky overcast. The new voting law
does not seem to meet with n‘niversali‘avor,
the vote being gathered..er slowly than
usual. ”liege .133 ,
Blmmwasm 1: ram
-13"; iii]? LoNKfléafifit'” Vlieavyv te is
theiosiiftiue'wtarvtiis? {We anaesthetics. .
are confident of carrying Buffalo and Erie
countv. The vote on the city ticket will
probably be close. Sheehan is running con
siderably behind Flower in most of the
wards.
A FULL VOTE BEING I'OLLED.
BOSTON, Nov. 3.—Returns from polls in
this city give but llttle indication. Large
increase is reported in the registration. All
points report the pooling steadily going on,
without any unusual accident or manifest
ations of interest. At Lowell, the voting
is apparently heavier than last year. At
Lawrence a big vote is being polled and it
is estimated that Russell will have 1,000
majority. At Fall River, the election is
proceeding quietly and a large vote is be
ing cast. Republicans expect Allen will
receivea much larger vote than Brackett
did. At polling places it is conceded that
Russell’s vote will‘be much larger than last
year, and a majority is various 5' estimated
at from 850 to 1,600. The reports from sur
rounding towns say a very full vote is be
ing polled.
REPUBLICANS AND PEOPLE’S PARTY.
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Nov. 3,—Dispatches
from all parts of Kansas where elections are
being held today show an orderly and
hotly contested election in progress. The
real contest is between the repu licans and
people’s party. ~
THE VOTE SMALL.
NEW YORK, Nov. 9.-—After 9 o‘clock the
voting became slower and at noon it was
the opinion of the leaders of both parties
that the number of votes up to that'honr
was considembly less than at previous elec~
tions.
ANTI-MAIIONE.
WINCHESTER, Va., Nov. 3.—The election
is passing oii' quietly. More interest is be
ing taken in voting for the republican anti-
Mahone candidate for house ofdelegates
than was anticipated.
M’KINLEY VOTED STRAIGHT.
CANTON, 0., Nov. 3.———Early this afternoon
Major McKinley voted the straight ticket.
He was heartily cheered by those assem
bled at the polls.
‘ BOTH CONFIDENT.
BOSTON, Nov. 3, 2 p.iii.-——Reports from all
parts of the state show a very full vote is
being polled and both democrats and re
publicans appear conlident of victory.
IN TIIE DAKOTAs.
ST. PAUL, Minn., Nov. 3.—-Chielly on ac
count of the large number of men engaged
in threshing wheat in South Dakota, the
vote in that state will. be light. A great
deal of “pairing” is being done by these
men and it is doubtful whether that fact
will effect the general result. County com
missioners are being voted for, besides con
gressmen, to fill the vacancy caused by the
death of James E. Gamble. The weather,
so far as reported, is fair.' Both republi
cans and independents claim to be getting
most of the votes, but the vote seems to be
most favorable to the farmer.
YANKTON, S. D., Nov. 3.—-The weather is
cloudy but waim. The votin is very
quiet under the Australian system. Jolly
republican, for congress, is receivmg a good
vote here, Woods, democrat, second and
Smith, independent, third.
TIIE SITUATION IN IOWA.
DES MOINEs, lowa, Nov. 3. Telegrams
received by the republican and democratic
committees show an unusually large vote
being cast. This is true in the country dis
tricts as well as {of the cities. .Both com
mittees claim gains in the Cities. The
democrats espiecially assert they will elect
the whole tic et, basing their indications
. on gains they are reported to be mrking in
the cities. The reepublicans are confident
, they will hold their own in_the Cities and
roll up overwhelming maLOi'ities in the
' country districtswhere pro ibition senti- ‘
ment is strong. Republicans are very conii- .
dent aboutthe leglslature. Reports received
from close senatorial districts seem espe.
cially cheering to them. The _ peep e’s,
- arty vote in Polk county is gomg to be
' lighter than anticipated and reports from
L outside counties indicate that the same
[ will be true in the state generally: The
, prohibition party vote Will be the ightest
l ever known since the organization of the
- party. The weather continues cloudy and
' threatening.
p REPUBLICANS CONFXDENT.
CINCINNATI, Nov. 3.—-Inm the afternoon
there was a. light fall of snow and rain
which astonished everybody. It was not
sufficient to have any efl'ect on the voting.
The general opinion at this hour (2:30 p.
m.) is the new law disfmnchises very few
voters and that its operations produces the
most peaceful election ever witnessed in
Cincinnati. There is no accurate method
of knowing what the record is in the ballot
boxes but the republicans still cling with
confidence to their claim of an overwhelm
ing plurality in Hamilon county.
Tim Healy Publiclyiflorsewllipped.
DUBLXN, Nov. 3.—Mr. McDermott,
nephew of the late Parnell, today Epublicly
horsewhipped Timothy Healy, the most
bitter of anti-Parnell leaders. The horse
whipping was the direct outcome of the
language used by Healy at Longford Sun
day last, when the anti-Parnell leader re
ferred to Miss Parnell and to the widow of
the late Charles Stewart Parnell. Healy
was rescued by the police who arrested Mc-
Dermott. Healy declined t 3 make charges
against his assailant and McDermott was
released. 7
The “’ealher 61; Election Day.
WASHINGTON, Nov. S.-—Foir ond mostly
cloudless weather everywhere prevails, ex
cept in Kansas, Missouri and Indian ten-i
--tory. The storm 1s central in North Mon
tana. but is unattended by rain or snow.
The weather today will be cool and sun
shiny in the Atlantic states, fair in Ohio
and Colorado, and fair but with overcast
sky over lowa.
WON DERFUESPUDS.
Vegetables Grown in Jefferson
County,on the Straits of Fuca.
\‘r'llfll Will Astonish the People of
Australia and Visitors
to Chicago.
PORT TOWNSEND, Nov. 3.—A number of
giant vegetables grown near Dungeness
were shipped to Melbourne and Sidney,
Australia and Chicago today. Among the
specimens were: White Star potatoes‘
weighing from 3 pounds to 4% pounds
each; Late Rose potatoes weighing 5%
pounds each; Poor Man’s Friend potatoes
weighing 6% pounds each; White Elephant
potatoes weighing from 3 to 4% pounds
each; a turnip weighing 25 pounds and a
beet weighing 21 pounds.
They werai grown by John Alexander,
M. Alexander, Hall Davis and John Dick
enson on their farms in the northern part
of Jefferson county, near Dungeness. They
were sent to the Merchants’ bank by \Vill
iam Church, manager of the Farmers’ Merfi
eautlle company. Some of ..the specimens
will be sent by C. F. Seal to Chicago and
Peoria, UL, and Dayton, 0., to. be put on
exhibition there. The rest will be sent by
Captain Barneson to Melbourne and Syd
ney, Australia, for exhibition, to show the
people of that distant island what America
can produce in the way of large vegetables.
The farm from which these potatoes were
taken yielded 600 bushels to the acre.
Only the larger potatoes will he sent to
,niarket. The small ones are kept at home
and used for food for cattle and hogs.
,Vflhatelfeflflilgd. small potatoes out here
would be considered from average size to
large in the East. Here anything under a.
pound is considered small. 011 the some
farms from which these giants were
brought were grown cabbages weighing 28
pounds each, and rutabagas, parsnips and
carrots of suCh immense size that they will
cause the people of the East to wonder
when they see them, and will have a better
effect upon homeseekers and will do more
toward attracting them to this state than
halfa. dozen real estate agents, lor they
show conclusively what Washington can
produce.
FRESH STATE was.
Francis Murphy, the temperance evan
gelist, is having big audiences in Seattle.
I). E. Durie, as editor, and Alex Begg,
as business manager of the Seattle Tele
graph, have retired from that paper.
Col. Will L. Visseher. of Fairhaven has
received the sad news of the death of his
father, Frederick Visscher. at. Montgomery,
Alabama.
Mr. Isaac Rees,'living at Maury on Va
shon Island, sixteen mules south of Seattle.
came to Seattle yesterday on a search for
William Scott, a young man who has un
accountably disappeared.
Mrs. Brooks, anaged and decrepit wom
an, who for a long time has wandered aim
lessly about the streets at all hours of the
day and night, was arrested in Seattle yes
terdaly on 3. Charge of being an habitual
drun ard.
The body of 001. W. H. Hakcs, late of
Port Townsend, but now ofFairhaven, was
found floating in the water by an Indian
ofl‘ Union wharf, Port Townsend, yester
day. The body bore marks of fou play.
He was anative of Illinois and ofthe “306”
wno stood by Grant in the national con
vention of 1880.
Desire for a good time prompted Carl
Tibbals, the 1(i-year-old brother of the
mayor of Port Townsend, to steal $350
from his mother. He left the Key City,
painted Seattle and Tacoma red and was
arrested in Tacoma yesterday.
The Fairhaven Herald says: Itts a ques
tion which are the greater, the sins of
omission or commission of the present
legislature. To enact creditable statutes
in atonement for them all would require
a very lengthy session.
PERSONALITIES.
W. L. Hathaway, of the Union City
Tribune, is in the city.
Law ers H. F. Garretson, P. C. Sullevan
and Wy St. Pritchard, are at the Olympia.
Err-Senator W. H. Kneeland, of Mason, ‘
Geo. Kennedy, of Seattle, and W. A. White, 1
1 of Spokane, are at the Carlton. }
' M. S. Plant, who has been here during
the past year, left last night for Passa-j
dena, Cal. ,
A. C. McDonald, of Colfax, D. C.
Guernsey, of Dayton, W. P. Wood, oi'Ta
coma, E. A, Bel en and J. klger and wife,
of San Francisco, and M. Maddny, of Vie
toria, are at the Olympia.
W. 'l‘. McDonald, E. E. and E. C. Crego
left on the 1 o’clock train for Portland and
will take the train tonight for Idaho.
More than a dozen friends were at the
depot to see them ofl'and they were fol
lowed hy a volley of cheers and the best
wishes of the people of Olympia. '
All Awlul Crime in Alabama.
GEORGIANA, Alabama, Nov. 3.——Last
night Thomas Sheppard and wife, a couple
of highly esteemed people residing two
miles from town, were murdered. Their
bodies were horribly butchered, the crime
having apparently been committed with
axes. Every trunk and drawer in the
house was pillaged. People in the state
are in a frenzy and a large force of men are
gatrolling the county in search of the mur
} erers.
A Bounclfix Boy.
NEW YORK, Nov. 3.-—Mrs. Herman Oel
richs has been delivered of a fine boy,
weighing exectly 11 pohnds and 7 onnces.
Mrs. Oelrichs. who a little over a year ago
was Miss Tessie Fair, of California, was do
ing remarkably well at midnight.
KISSANE AGAIN.
lhe California Man Wlth a Bad
Eastern Record.
An Attempt to Recover Five Thous
and Dollars—A Curious
Case.
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 3.~—The suit of Mrs.
Sallie Hart, against Wm. K. Rogers to re
cover five thousand dollars for services
rendered by her deceased husband, Attor
ney Jesse B. Hart, began before Judge
Finn yesterday. Rogers is the assumed
name of Wm. Kissane, who had been in
dicted in New York and Arkansas for var
ious crimes thirty—five years ago. He was
convicted in New York City on one charge
of forgery. but influential friends secured
his release aftera few months imprison
ment. Another charge of forgery was com
promised by the payment of twelve thou
sand dollars, but by some inadvertence
both indictments were never dismissed but
remained in jail force. Kissane came to
California in the fifties, changed his name,
took part in the Fraser river mining ex
citement, accompanied Walkers’ expedi
tion‘to Nicaragua and returned to settle in
Sonoma county where he married and has
acquired confiderable property. In 1887 he
began receiving anonymous letters, which
disclosed the tact of his identity was known
and which gave him to understand the in
dictments were still hanging over him.
During the trial yesterday Rogers stated
that be employed Hart to go east and se~
cure the With rawa] of the indictments.
Instead of so doing Hart gave the Califor
nia papers a clue by moving for the dis
missal of the indictments in open court.
For this reason Rogers claims he owes
nothing to Hart’s estate. The case will go
on this week.
TELEGRAPHIC TALES.
The steamer Turnessia from New York
for Glasgow has arrived at Moville.
, The muicipal council of Drogheda re—
.ilected a motion to present an address to
ohn Dillon.
The Fulda beat the best previous steam
ship record from New York to Gibraltar.
Time of passage, eight days and eight
hours.
At a meeting of the municipal council of
Waterford the mayor refused to put a mo—
tioirthat the council present an address
to Dillon and O’Brien.
The executive committee of the national
education association has decided to hold
its next annual convention at Saratoga
springs July 10th to the 15th, 1892.
Three convicts escaped from the peni
tentiary at Santa Fe yesterday. They used
imitation pistols, whittled out 0! wood, to
stand ofl’t re guard and made their tlight
on horses. One of the trio was shot in the
arm and re-captured by the guard.
The Itata case came to an end today in
Los Angeles, Judge Ross of the United
States court rendering a decision granting
the motion to dismiss the case against the
defendants. The decision was a very
lengthy one.
After two years’ time, during which two
persons werekiiiedtzyviolence growing out
of ill'feeling the moi ers and the employers
in San Francisco, the strike of the non
molders has been declared off, the union
voluntarily declaring it off.
LOCAL TIDE LAND APPRAISERS.
No Appropriation to Meet Their Ex
penses.
The work of the local tide land apprais
ers will probably stop, because no appro
priation was made by the legislature with
which to pay them. This work, it is esti
mated, will cost more than $60,000, and the
state auditor has received numerous vouch
era for the work done. One appraiser has
received a certificate of indebtedness upon
vouchers, but no warrants can be drawn.
Three appraisers are appointed in each
county where tide lands exist, whose duty
. it is toexarnine the shore and tide lands.
“it {s' uig'a’at’y‘aéaarc’asL; board-With- §
in ninety days after organization, to ex- 1
amine, survey and appraise so much of
shore and tide lands in their respective
counties as lie within and in front of the
corporate limits of any incorporated city
or town, and within two miles thereof, on
either side. classifying and fixing the value
of each lot, block or tract, and noting the
improvements, for which service they will
receive $5 per day and mileage at the rate
of 10 cents per mile and other expenses.
Until the work of the local appraisers is
complete, no tide lands can be bought or
sold. The appraisers for Thurston county
are E. W. Andrews, Francis Rotch and
Frank Ruth.
MISSING MEN.
Mothers and Wives Want to Find
Them.
The TRIBUNE has received two letters
making inquiries—Tor persons who have dis
appeared from home. One is asking for
information of a man named Dill Cary,
whose home was in Talent, Oregon. Dill
was at one time employed by Mr. Chambers.
, he has not been heard from at home for a
year. His aged mother is crazed with
grief, and information bearing upon his
whereabouts will be greatly received by
Mrs. Mary Cary, Talent, Jackson county,
Oregon.
Inquiry comes from Corning. lowa, for
James R. Harris and Charles R. Harris.
Both have dark hair and blue eyes. May
change their names to Ross or Rosse l
Reiger. Address Mrs. Mary Harris, Cor—
ning, lowa, box 257.
Information is wanted of Jack Siddons
or, Sparks. About 44 years of age and
came to the coast in the sixties. Address
T. P. H. TRIBUNE oflice.
, _.____._______
Jurors Dissatisfied.
Editor Tribune:
The jury which have been in session for
the past month. has been adjourned several
days during this period of time. There
seems to be considerable dissatisfaction ex
isting among the jurors owing to the fact
that they have been compelled to lose
several days and for which they have not
beenallowed their regular fees, which they
claim they are justly entitled to. Many
of the jurors are compelled to leave their
business and some of them from every pre
cinct in the county. Thejurors have all
attended and done their work faithfully,
and it does not seem right and just that
they should not be entitled to receive pay
for every day they leave their homes and
places of business. M. D. W 001),
Rainier Precinct.
County Surveyors.
A permanent organization of county sur
veyors was effected yesterday by the elec- ,
tion of J. K. Ashley, Spokane county, pres
ident; W. P. Wood, of Pierce, vice presi
dent; L. P. Ouellette, of Thurston, secre
tarv~treasurer. The executive committee
will formulate an argument for presentation
to the legislature, asking for recognition of
county surveyors county officers and re
seribing more specifically their duties. The
meeting was he (1 in the office of Ouellette
& Gillie, 1n the Woodrufl" block.
LARGEST CIRCULATION
o——— O—-———-—o
Of Any Daily Newspaper West of Seattle
- and Tacoma
< EVENING EDITION.
'I'ACOIVIA [IEI’IIIILICA NS.
A Rousing Big Meeting: at the
League Club Rooms.
TACOMA, Nov. 3.»—’l‘here was a big crowd
at the opening of the Republican League
club rooms last night. Rousing and en
thuiastic speeches were made by Judge
Styles, Judge Cslkins, Secretary of State
Weir and Attorney W. H. Priehurd. Judge
Stiles in the course of his remarks said:
"If free and untrannneled ballot lies (it
the bottom of our system. we believe in n.
free ballot and and honest count. [Ap
plause.] If Ilearn that Jones, 01' Brown
or Smith, who is sent to this legislature to
vote in a certain way on an imPortunt
measure, has yielded to bribery am voted
in a contrary way, I am robbed of my
ballot. If this club will go forward, not
exacting pledges from its representatives
—for 18,111 not in favor of that sort of
thing—but if this club will see to it to send
strong intelligent men, who will work for
the best interests of the state, then it will
come to pass here as in Pennsylvania, that
it will bea, crime to oller a bribe. [Ap
plause.) _
Judgfe Calkins in closlng in addressing
himse f to the young men said: “(let it
right start. Be honest, be fearless—don’t
be dishonest in politics. Pick up your
mantles as they fall off, and I am sure you
will win more encomiums than we have.
BLOODY ' WORK.
How They Killed Our Sailors
. in Valparaiso,
All Eye Witness of the Affair 'l‘uliu
About ll—Tlle Chilean -
NEW YORK, Nov. B.——The World’s Val—
paraiso correspondent says: “I saw the
most importantwitness of the all‘ray in the
streets of Valparaiso on board the Balti
more today. He says he saw annbull,
1 the murdered sailor of Baltimore, runnmg
up the street pursued by a mob with drawn
knives. He was overtaken by a man, who
plunged the knife into his body. Turnbnll
fell within nine feet of witness who stood
over him and deltanded the form of the
prostrate man, not knowing whether he
was alive or deed. He assisted him to the
chemists shop. The chemist was loath to
shelter the wounded man, fearing the
people. Witness insisted that he should
help wash and dress Turnbull’s wounds.
Then he took a carriage and started to the
English hospital. The driver was afraid
and said the man must go to the Chilean
hospital. Witness took him there. Wit
ness was afterwards arrested and insulted
by the officer of police who put at loaded
gun to his head threateninfi to shoot if he
opened his month about t e matter. He
claims his body was bruised by blows He
asked the protection of Captain Schley and
says he is afraid for his life ashore.
THE SUPREME COURT.
An Opinion In a Thurston County
Case.
.Qi‘oditors attached the stock of Reuben
Warren, at Bucoda, Thurston county.
The property was ordered sold, to bodi
vided among the creditors. Two mort
gagesliad been given ten days previously.
however, and the niortgagees, Moses
Warren and Garretson Woodrulf, Pratt &
00., of Tacoma, Joined in a complaint to
have their claims paid first. The supreme
court holds that the decree of the court be
low holding the mortgages to he fraudu—
lent and a disposition o the proceeds on
that basis, nrust be set aside and the cause.
remanded, With instructions to take proof
as to the amount which has been paid on
account of the liabilities, for which the
mortgage to Moses Warren was an indem
nity, and to deduct from the amount there
of the cash and credit sales made by the
mortgagor; after the execution of said mort
gage. and to satisfy the remainder out of
the money in the registry of the court, and
apply the resume of: such mortgage of
xarretson, .Woodruil'. :I’ratt it. Go. The
appellant is to recover of the attaching
creditor the cost of this appeal.
METEOROLOGICAL Ill'JPlDli'l‘.
OLYMPIA, Wash., Nov. :2, 18m.
wfirfil‘llt‘:
P] eof E (saggygiE-E.‘ St! f
11.0 m f‘ r: _ (I'o 0
Observation. E §§ggiiigi weather.
.5: .5 is new;
gamma. ... .: 29.78 is s—w— Light {.774 Emit?
Portlanil...... 29.8262 BE 14 1.58 Reining
1 Wailii. Walla. 29.94%) E Light .52 Cloudy
Spokane...... 29.98 48s Light Aidiltiilning
Baker City.... 30.044881? 6 .B-iiclondy
Itosehurg..... 29.9851 Cm Calm 1.561” Cloudy
Eureka. ... 30.04 6-2 S 6 .530 Pt Cloudy
Itcd,liluif..... 30.18 51} NW Light .‘l/liCloudy
Sacramento... 30.14 54 NW Ii .OOiClouily
San Francisco 30.16 50 SW Light .Ooili‘ogu‘y
Afito‘Lw.;:_‘~i‘-Z'_7Ei2.‘§l‘Li‘L .1 i‘ifl‘ii‘; {EFL
LOCAL niiroiir.
The maximum temperature today was
54 degrees and the minimum 48. Maximum
speed of wind,lo miles per hour, from
southwest. Amountoi’ rainfall, 2.07 inches
(for twenty-four hours ending at 3 p.m).
Amount of rainfall since . uly 1, 1801.
14.12' inches; average (for. several years)
since July 1, 1891, 9.15 inchesp excess
since Julyl, 1891, 4.97 inches. Indications
for tomorrow, continued rainy weather.
E. B. OLNEY, Observer.
Keene, the Great Actor.
On next Thursday evening the eminent
tragedian, Mr. Thomas W. Keene. will
make his first appearance before an ()lyni
pian audience. The death of the late Law
rence Barrett and the announced retire
ment from the stage of Edwin Booth,
leaves Mr. Keene the only American repre
sentative of the class of players who con—
fine their talents exclusively to the deline
ation of classical tragic roles. Mr. Keene
is as yet agoungman one possessed of all
the fire an Vita ity of; youth and blessed
witha keen,discriminative mind, a broad
yetaccurate conception, and a voice and
physique which eminently fit him for the
portrayal of the llne of parts to which he
ias devoted his art. Mr. Keene is this sea—
son supported by the best company with
which e has ever been able to surround
himself. “Richelieu" has been-selected
for the opening performance. “Richard
III" will be presented on Friday evening.
Dr. Minkler’s Case.
The prelimiiirry examination of Dr.
Minkler was concluded before Justice Ratli
bun last night. The doctor’s bond for ap
pearance at the January term of the su
perior court, was fixed at SB6O which was
urnished by Dr._Eitel and Rev. C. 1).
Spencer of Centralia. »
Two Swedes in Trouble.
Last night two Swedes got into an alter
cation at their boarding place and one
. ruined a chair over the head of the other.
Complaint was made before Justice Rath
bun who issued a warrant for the arrest of
:, the ofi'ender. His trial comes off this all
,- ternoon.
, Culllornlu uraln Market. ,
: SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 3.—-Wlieat, buyer
’9l, $1.7%,; season, $1.83%.
outrages.

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