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Olympia tribune. (Olympia, Wash.) 1890-1893, November 12, 1891, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085350/1891-11-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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OFFICIAL PAPER
o———-—o F———-—o
The Cities of Olympia and Tumwater, and
- ' Thurston County.
V’OLUME 11. NO. 160 >
S ' & White
' éhPROPRIETORS OF——————-f
_. 3.; 4% “mat. may
Arwgifiiw .‘euulrrrrmxfi
/Ji|:.w':i;"7w‘ '
“:3“: M l
v .:“ :: 3::E‘_Ef=;e: ‘1: r 5; ’ »
1.233“ ’1 LT:- “T.~.§= :,l ,—&'_%/"S w-é --‘—' __:_::—_:= j." L‘l—LLJA—j
~———~MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN—————
eel-DOORS, SASH AND BLINDS-lér
. WRITE FOR ESTIMATES- ‘
Corner of Third and Jefferson Street, Olympia.
. ——-_—_—_'————'——;
E. S. HORTON . ,
_ STEAM
—ANn«——; l
‘ GAS~FITTING. ‘
STOVES AND TINWARE,
REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO
-424 Fourth Street. Telephone No. 13.
_——_-——'-_—-_____—____
MILLARD LEMON, PRESIDENT. MARY L. PAGE, SECRETARY.
ROBT. F. WHI'IHAM, TREASURER. F. G. BLAKE, MANAGER.
CAPITAL CITY
ABSTRACT Ar TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY.
(INCORPORATED) _. W _
Draughting and Blue Printing.
Our Abstracts are posted to date figsgngglrliérégfigg if?!) £21333? complete set of Abstracts from
Llljvpslairs In Chanlbers Block - ~ - -y. - Olylnpla, Wash.
,
G- NOSCHKA,
kmMrchant Tailor
*1 {‘er LATVQZE—Iér-EAlways keeps a full assortment of;— 7
{fl}: IGNANDIDOMESTIC GOODS. PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED IN EVERY CASE.
5.5”“ .r REPAIRING NEATLY DONE- '
T. J. MCBRATNEY
F FD ' W
2:
arm . ehverv agons
Carriages, Buggies, Road Carts, Ploivs, Etc.
Agricultural Implements of Every Description.
COLUMBIA, NEAR FIFTH STREET.
. "W
CRISMAN-SARGENT . ‘
COMPANY
218 THIRD STREET, OLYMPIA, WASH. ’
-==-—————-—-—_—_________
Gr U RNEY
EL an IEIDS OT O.
Successors to FOSTER & LABEBEE.
We have added to our already large stock a FIRST-CLASS WAGON, specially fitted
fur the removal of Pianos. Furniture and Baggage. ‘Our facilities for the re
moval of safes and all opher heavy floods are 0 the best. All orders for
Hacks, Gurneys, Livery. True s,_Baggagi)e, eta, promptly at
tended to. A first-class boardmg sta 1e .11 connection.-
CORNER MAIN AND THIRD ST.;
Telephone Number 3. -
————-——__—__________
- . C- BEARY,
‘ ' GENERAL REPAIRING- '
V CARTRIDGES LOADED TO ORDER. AMMUNITION OF ALL KINDS.
Silsby Block, Main Street, Olympia.
mm
mm
I—IARNED & BA TES
Undertakers and Funeral Dlrectors
Especial Attention Given to Embalmiug for Shipment. .
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT TEL. NO. '7.
. 116 West Sixth Street
—W
—————.—_______________
STATE PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY . ‘
Book : and : Job : Printing :- Specialties.
Northeast Corner of Fourth and. Adams street, Olvmple, “’ashlngton.
()EIIJMPIA TRIBUNE
'OTHZ‘MPIA. WASHINGTON. THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 12, 1891.
BLANK BOOKS
School : Books
Stationory‘ofoE Kinds.
Inks, Muoimjzoood—Wall Paper.
W. A. VAN EPPS, PROP.
Headquarters for Everythmg.
—-—A magnificent stock (If——
WALL PAPER AND
Ceiling Decorations
Just received.
East 4th st - - - Olympia, “ash:
'ROBER 1‘ FROST
HEAVY AND ISHELF
~——o—-
, Wooden and Willow ware, crockery and
glassware, guns pistols, rifles, all kinds of
ammunition, cement. paint oils and win
dow glass.
OLM Y PIA.
Collegiate Institute
————o.— ‘
“The Pioneer School of Washington.”
._o_
COLLEGE COURSE, per term, ~ sl2.
NORMAL COURSE, per term, - 12.
COMMERCIAL COURSE, per term, 13.
GRAMMER COURSE, per term, - 8.
MUslc, per term, - - - 12.
ELOCU’I‘ION, per terml - ’- 15.
STENOGRAPHY, per'term, - - 10.
ART INSTRTCTION, per hour, - 250.
......0—
The oiier of board, tuition and room want for
$l5O per year in advance has already brought
about 75 students to Olympia from abroad. All
the privelcges and opportunities of the Institute
are open to the patrons of Oiympia for the price
of tuition alone . 1
A Faculty of nine Instructors and Specialists,
completely furnished boarding am lodiing
halls, literary and debating societies and t or~
ough work in all departments are the advan
tages offered.
For further information call on or address
35v WIHEB common
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS,
G M. SAVAGE & CO.
CONTRACTORS.
Bridge Building and Pile Driving. ‘
I LIBER MAN
- 1
. CONTRACTOR. I
l
Grading and Bridging. Office: Room 3
8, Woodrufl block. 1
“I A. ROGERS , l
O r
l
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Estimates made on application. ‘
OLYMPIA - - - - - WASH.
J W. ROBERTS
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Office fittings, counters, shelvirig and all
jobbing promptly attended to. stimates
furnished on application. P. 0. box 177.
OLYMPIA. WASH.
WEEKS & co
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS.
Plans and specifications furnished.
OLYMPIA AND TACOMA - - - - WASH.
GARD & BROWN
GRADING AND EXCAVATING.
Lot and land clearing done proxriptly.
Camp on Westside on Fourth and ront
streets.
OLYMPIA ' - - WASH.
m
EG MPR EMENT G ‘
0R ON I W o.i
--—OPERATING THE—
Olympia & Ghehalis Valley Ry
l __o_
Time Card to take effect Sunday Nov. 1.
—-.——o—_-
NO. 1.
Leave},.............01ympia...........49140a. m.
Arrive......1..1.u”Tenin0....m.....102303. m.
‘ NO. 2.
1Leave.1..............'1‘en1n0............1025021.1n.
1 Arrive...............01ympia.......,...11:50a.m.

l NO. 3.
3 Leave,..........,...01ympia.........‘...32501).m.
1Arrivc.‘.............Tcniu0.....,.......4250p.m.
1 NO. 4.
iLeavennuu........Ten1n01.......,...5:05p.m.
1Arrive..........,...01ympia..........H525‘3 p.m.
_.____o_.__
Nos, 1 and 4 run daily. Nos. 2 and 3, daily ex
cept Sunday. ‘
The morning train makes close connection
with the Nort ern Pacific train from Tacoma.
\to Portland, and the evening train connects
j with the train from Portland to Tacoma.
; J. c. PHELPS,
‘ Ass 12., Supt
HIS GRIP WAS G 001).
lellory Butler Hallgs to Real
Estate and Sells at a Profit.
SEATTLE, Nov. 12.—Hillory Butler’s sale
1 of his Second street block in this city for
$150,000 for which he paid Henry Yesler
$l5O thirth-eight years ago, created the
livelist kllld of talk in local real estate cir
cles. Mr. Butler in speaking of the sale
this morning said:
.“i came across the plains with Judge
Hayes, Geor e Frye, Mr. Parker and Mr.
Prather. \ng stopped at Olympia, but
finallwaith Mr. Frlye came over here
toget ier. In .1844 bought the lot
on which the Butler block stand from Mr.
Yesler and paid for them $75 apiece.
“I bought it thirty-eight years ago and
have held it ever since. I paid $l5O for it
and have realized $150,000 for it. Young
man if you wish to get rich, do as I have ‘
done,” said the pioneer witha broad smile; I
“buy a piece of Seattle property and hold
on to it for thirty-eight years and itwill be
sure to be valuable. At first I used the
property as a residence. Then I began to
add houses and rent them out. When the
big conflagatiou of June 6, 1888, camel
had about $40,000 worth of buildings on
the property and was deriving a, large in
come from it. It was all swept away by
the fire, and as I was unable to bui d
leased :the property to Guy 0. Phinney,
who erected the Butler block on it. Now
I have sold it, and at a good figure, too.
I disliked, though, to part with the proper
ty after holding it for so long a time."
OUR NAVALWLITIA.
A BATTALION TO BE ORGANIZED
0N PUGET SOUND.
How The Membershlp Will be Se.
cured. The Condltlon of the
Naval Reserve in Cal.
lion-Illa.
Lieut. W. H. Gorham of Seattle and
others are interested in organizing a naval
militia in this state, a company of which
is to be organized in Olympia.
“The Naval Battalion is composed of ex
, petty officers and seamen of the United
istafes navy, engineers, machinists, elec
tricians, yachtsmen and young business
men. Is it not well to hold such men to
gether in an organized body,_ so they may
be educated and prepared for possible
future service, and, who are ready at a
moment’s notice to go on board a man-of
war and intelligently execute any orders
the government may deem fit to live? It
is the intention that the naval reserve man
shall not only become proficient in certain
infantry tactics, but shall also receive thor
ough instruction in seamanship, naviga
tion, gunnery, engineering and torpedo
practice, under the super Vision of officers
detailed i‘rom‘the United States navy.
“Different successive secretaries of the
navy have recommended the proper estab
lishment of the navalwrescrve. Naval
officers themselves are in hearty sympathy
1 with the movement and the sentiment of
the business community of the country
l generally is that it solves an effective and
economical support ofthe nation’s naval
strength. ‘ ,1 2
, “Qgsgfinafi by her’ilegislgurehwanted a
ram ‘1; 8. ~r:eel'i..gr“.e-s.s ,6 ofa
battalion; 'Tlris‘h’grasl hee’n , provideéfimm.
men are all enlisted and undergoing
‘ weekly drills.
, "The men were obliged to have a drill
; room. They put their hands into their
1 pockets and provided that.
‘ “The seamen required a practice ship.
The federal government promises one.
"The ship must be properly equip ed.
The congressional delegation from Bali
fornia will use their earnest efforts in, secur
ing such equipment. .
. “The men are obliged by law to have
uniforms the same as in the United States
navy. It may be well to here explain that
the uniforms for the commissioned officers
are provided for by themselves.
“’ he Naval Batallion in California has
received any quantity of good wishes
‘Glad to see you organized,’ ‘lt is a good
idea,‘ ‘I heartily approve of it,’ etc., but
good words, while very encouraging, will
not purchase uniforms nor pay armory
rentand expenses. Western Washington
ought to be able to organize asplendid bat
talion and will probably do so.
TELEGRAPH“) TALES.
‘ The United States steamer Kearsarge
‘ has arrived at St. Thomas, West Indies.
W. H. Smith (it 00., ship brokers and
;commission merchants of New York, as
: signed today.
‘ ' The navy department has authorized the
twelfth payment of $53,880 to be made to
the Union Iron Works, California, on ac
count of cruiser No. 8.
Lady Elizabeth Mary Grosvenor, dow
ager marchioness of Westminster. young
est daughter of the first duke of Suther
land, is dead.
Thepope has renewed his protest to the
minister of worship against supporting the
position taken by the Italian government
In connection With the recent pilgrim inci
den t in Home.
The London Chronicle this morning an
nounces that the trichinw has been found
in American pork at Solingent, a town of}
Rhenish Prussia. . i
The authorities of the Russian war
office have resolved to construct a line of
forts along the Chinese frontier and to in
crease the number of oflicars in Central
Asia.
More Wrecks on the Shore. .
LONDON, Nov. 12.—Last night a heavy
gale set in in the south ofEngland and Ire
land. Alreadya few dispatches have been
received telling of wrecks caused by the
storm. From Hythe on the English chan
nel comes the report ofa wreck of an Eng
lish schooner. The crew reached the
shore safely but the captain, his wife and
son perished. At Sandgate the ship Ben
venus was wrecked. Her crew took to the
rigging. An attempt was made by the
life savers to rescue them, but the sea was
too high. Another vessel is reported
ashore close to the Benvenus.
The Flow of Gold.
WASHINGTON, N ov. 12.—The chief of the
bureau of statistics reports the total value
of exports of domestic breadstufi's during
Oct., 1891. as $21,463,334. The director of
the mint desires to correct the figures pub
lished in an abstract or his report as to the
amount of the return movement ofléold to
the United States from July Ito ov. 1,
1891. The amount returned was $22,322,-
773. Amistake was made in the ofiicial
copy furnished to the press.
A Straight Tip for Fishermen.
Here is a straight tip for the fishermen
of Budd’s Inlet. Get several incandescent
electric lights and lower them into the
water with a large seine beneath them.
Fish are attracted by the mysterious glare,
and, when the fishermen see that they
have a good haul they can heave away.
The catches will be very large. This re
duces the catching of fish to something
like an exact science.
Why
Ship in flour and feed when you can bur
home production from the Capital Mil a
Tumwater. ’l‘elphone 98.
HELD UP A TRAIN.
A LARGE AMOUNT OF BOOTY SAID
TO BE TAKEN.
A Bold Act of Railroad Highway-
men on the Chicago, Milwau
kee A: St. Paul Railroad.
MILWAUKEE, Nov. 12.—The midnight
train from Chicago on the Milwaukee &
; St. Pauli-cad, was robbed by masked men
‘neer Western Union Junction at 1 o’clock
this morning. The train had been out to
the junction, twenty-three miles south of
this place, about half a. mile, when Fire
man Edward Averill, who was putting
some coal into the furnace, was startled by
a. noise behind him. He turned around
and discovered two masked men slumber
ing over the engine tender. Both leveled
their double-barreled guns at the fireman
and engineer, Bill McKay, with an injunc
tion, “don’t move an inch until we tell
you to or we will blow the top of your
damn heads off. Engineer McKay was
directed to run about one mile from the
Western Union Junction. He was com
manded to stop, both men were ordered to ‘
step down out of the cab, 1
l THEY WERE MARCHED
to the express car under cover and then the
work of blowing open the safe began. Sev
eral bombs, the fireman thinks they were,
were thrown into the car and the explo
sions were terrillc and musthave awakened
every passengeron the train, but nobody
appeared on the scene. The robbers un
doubtedly were not less than six or seven
in number, judging from the manner in
which they conducted operations. The train
men believe they had a team close at hand
with which to cart away the safe, which
was taken boldly out of t e car. Fireman
Averill’s story was the most comprehens
ive. “They made walk ahead of them to
the express car,” he said, “and they gave
me a jimmy to pry open the boxes. They
got the messenger’s keys, though he was in
no hurry to give them up, and they will
have no trouble in getting away with the
money.” -
‘ THE TRAIN WAS HELD
for over half an hour. The entire efforts of
the robbers were centered on the express
car and not a passenger was molested. The
fireman thinks there were a half dozen men
guarding the coaches, however.
MILWAUKEE, Nov. 12.—A ang of masked
men stopped the Chicago, Lillilwaukee 65 St.
Paul north-bound passenger train near
Western Union Junction this morning,
aided by two confederates on the train.
The express car was attacked and it is re
ported the messenger made a desperate re
sistance but was overpowered. A large
amount of money was taken from the ex-
Eress safe. The w ires are in bad condition
ecause of the storm and particulars are
meagire, The passengers were not nio
leste . A private dispatch says the ex
gress car was blown open with a dynamite
omb. The first news of the robbery was
broujght to the Western Union Junction by
the agmaii. Milwaukee and Racine no
lice were telegraphed for immediately and
Detective Hansen was provided with a
special train on wnich he left at 2:40
o clock.
“LESS THAN rivn MiNUTEs
out of Western Union Junction,” said Mes
senger Murpy “the train was slowed up.
Suddenly a musket was poked through
the top window of the car and a second
~lfiater._a terrific ,explosion occurred that
nausea both myself and Mr. Cook in a
heap. Half adozeii more explosions fol
lowed and both doors flew off the bolt.
Then two men wearing big black masks
clambered quickly into the car and covered
us with muskets. We were cautioned to
maintain silence, under penalty of getting
our heads blown OH. Ai‘ter'glancing hur
riedly about the car the robbers fastened
their eyes on two iron boxes of the Ameri—
can Express Go’s, The robbers brought a
fireman in a little later and went through
all the boxes. They compelled us to hand
over the keys. They dumped the boxes
out on the roadbed. One of the robbers
kept us covered with his musket all the
time, while another superintended o era
tions." The lireman and Messenger IMur
phy stated they secured all bills of money
contained in the safe and that sum was un
doubtedly a very large one. It is probable
the total amount
or THE ROBBERS’ BOOTY
will amount to SIOO 000 and possibly more.
Anofiicial of the git. l’aul road said the
train which was held up was one which
generally carried all the money received by
the Milwaukee banks from the east in the
‘ morning. Agent John F. Bell, of the
American Express company, said to a re~
porter: An approximate statement of the
amount také’n by the robbers could not be
learned, he said $50,000 in local packages
was certainly gone, besides the sum con
tained in two sealed envelopes. Some of
the passengers who were asleep did not
know anyt ring about the “hold up” until
the'train arrived in Milwaukee. Some Of
the passengers thought there were twenty
or thirty robbers; others thought they saw
only saw a dozen, while others said there
were more robbers than passengers. When
the train started up again the passcn ers
saw the safes lying beside the trackfimt
the robbers had disappeared. When the
train started at Union depot at 2 :20 o’clock
the express presented a sight that would
indicate it had been attacked by heavy ar
tillery. Every door and window was
blown outand the platform and walls shat
tered in half a dozen places, while the con
tents were piled indiscriminately in a heap
in the center of the car. The messenger,
G. 0. Murphy and his assistant, 0. H.
Cook, were found gathering up the frag
ments of waybills and looking over the
remnants lezt by the robbers.
GOT NO BOOTY.
CHICAGO, Nov. 12. —— General Manager
Earling of the St. Paul and Milwaukee re—
ceived a despatch this morning saying the
robbers did not get any booty from the ex
press car held up near the Western Union
Junction this morning. The despatch said,
the robbers after gaining admisston to the
express car commanded the messenger to
openlthe safes. He refused and the safes
were pitched out of the car out on the]
ground. In the meantime the rear brake
man, understanding the situation, rushed
back _;to the junction and got an engine
and posse at once and went to the scene
and the robbers lied. The robbers had
tried to force open the door of the safe, but
were unsuccessful. The train went on to
Milwaukee and the fast mail train which
left Chicago picked up the safes and car~
ried them to Milwaukee. The police of
Milwaukee and the secret service of the
St. Paul system, together with the sheriff
of Raines county, are in pursuit of the
robbers. Their flight was so sudden they
did not take precautions to cover their
tracks, so the officials believe they will
GET THEM BEFORE NOON
today. Express Messenger Murphy re
orted at the headquarters of the American
Express company here and gave an ac
count of his experience. He detailed the
facts as given in a previous interview, add
ing that a number of shots were fired.
Three robbers after gaining entrance de
manded and got the keys to the safe at the
muzzle of their guns. The engineer was
i compelled to force open the local safe con
tained money an valuables consigned
from Chicago for points between Chicago
and Lacrosse. Although the safes had
combination locks, the robbers were una
ble to get into them. The robbers then
compelled the trainmen to assist them in
throwing their treasure boxes from the car
and the firemen, messenger and his helper
were ordered to leave the car, followed by
three robbers with ;leveled upon them.
The three trainmen were compelled to
walk about a quarter of amile. In the
meantime the locomotive headlight had
been extinguished. They then sent the
engineer and firemen to the cab and or
dered the train to pull out of the way. The
safe contained betwre". two and three
1 thousand dollars and . waybills, which
were taken and robably defigroyed. When
the train arriveg at Frankvil e, a telegram
was sent to the Western Union Junction
and a. posse was sent to the scene.
Wonuuvs Press Club.
Bos’ron, Nov. 12.—The first annual con
vention, of the National Federation of
Women’s Press Clubs is in session here.
The principal business was the adoption- of
a. constitution and the election of their of- a
ficers. Mrs. Sallie Joy \Vhite, of Boston, ‘
was elected president; Mrs. Martha D. Lin—
coln, of Washin ton, vice president; Mrs.
Ed C. Edhorn, éau Francisco, recording
secretary; Mrs. Fanny H. Rastallflhicago,
treasurer; Mrs. Belvu Lockwood. \V-ashing
ton, secretary.
Forty Famllies Burned out.
LONDON, Nov. 12.—Early this morning a
fire in Bethnal Green, an eastern suburb
of London, in a quarter occupied by lum
ber yards, factories and a large number of
tenements filled with poor families, caused
a heavy damage. The only one casualty
which resulted in death was that of a child
which was the result of exposure. Among
the groperty destroyed was an extensive
lum er yard, the Flack factory and a num
ber of dwelling houses. Forty families
were rendered homeless.
CHINESE VILLAINS.
THE LEADER. OF A SECRET SOOI
- IS CAPTURED.
The Situation in Said to be Serious,
But the Viceroy is not.
“’orried.
“SHANGAI, Oct. 19.—Uhen Kin Lung, lead
er of Kolao hin, the secret society which
has been instrumental in causing an upris—
ing in Human, was Captured by six runners
of Shangai and 800 Chow police, while
staying at an inn in 800 Chow. He was
accompanied by a band of thirty men and
was getting ready to leave for llnng Chow
and other inland pieces when he was sur
prised at night by runners who, despite his
endeavors to protect himself with his
sword, quickly overpowered him and be—
fore he had given an alarm gagged and
bound him,boarded a steam launch and
proceeded to Shanghi. His examination
was conducted with secrecy by the magis
trate and deputies of the governor and of
Tootin. Several official documents were
sued by Kolao‘ Hin were found on his
person. In them he was addressed as the ‘
”EIGHTH omen PRINCE”
and as commander of numerous forces.
Three examinations have been held but
Chen refused to make any disclosures,
despite torture, saying to the oliicers that
he would not betray' is cause and that he
was not the only one ready to give up his
life for the cause he joined. The oliicials
are now pursuing another method, they
feast him and ply him with liquor in hopes
that he willlet fall some information un
der its influence. They have thus far met
with no success. Mason, the custom oliicial
who made theattem pt to smugi'glearms into
China and puthimselfforwart ass possible
leader of the rebellion was examined be
fore the British police court at Shanghai.
Developments show the affair was a quix
otic attengit 011 Mason’s part to obtain no—
toriety an has no real political signifi
cance. The N anking Viceroy is said to have
advised the inn erlal government not to
open Hunan. gletive boats are closely
watched in the Yang-’l‘sze for smuggled
arms. The Mercury’s Tuntsin correspon
dent says Viceroy Li Hung Chang appears
to be in a cheerful state of mind and seems
to think the internal affairs are not at all
serious and that the foreign powers are
only
PLAYING A GAME OF BLUFF.
The general feeling, however, is one of
insecurity, and it is further stated that the
Viceroy at Nanking has strongly advised
the British consul at Chinkisn to remove
the European women and chilffren.
The following is the distribution of
foreign men-of—wur on the Yang-Tszc at
I-lankow: British cruiser Archer; German
?Einbost Iltis and a Russian ram; at Ching
iang, British gunboat Redpole; at Kin~
kiang, French cruiser I'nconstant; at Wuh—
hub, British gunbout Peacock. At Chin
Kiang there are also the Chinese sloops
Chin Ching and I’ow Thing and the rev
enue cruiser Feihoo.
COFFEE AND TEA.
Some of the Choicer Grades Never
Sent to this Country.
New York Letter: People are continu
ally calling at the grocers for Mocha coii'ee.
and many will take no other. As a matter
of fact there are probably not 500 people
in the United States who have ever tasted
real Mocha, and I do not believe there is a
single pound of it to be found between the
Atlantic and the Pacific. The Arabs of
Arabia, not those of Africa, are the most
fastidious coffee-drinkers in the world, and
“the crop of Mocha is not large. The gov
ernors and shieks get the pick, the finest
and plumpest berries being chosen for
them. The rich Arabs get the second
choice. The rest is sold throughout the
country and a very little, consisting of the
shriveled and broken berries, linds its way
to Constantinople. Not a hundredweight
a year gets west of that city. What is
called Mocha consists of inferior Arabian
growths, at least a little of it does, and
coffee from Ceylon and Java, a most in
ferior kind. Americans never see the best
tea. None of the finest‘growth ever leaves
China, and the best 0 the export goes
, overland to Russia, being known as “cara
van tea.” Some of this retails as high as
SSO a pound. True caravan tea is never
brought to this country, as it is believed
I that a sea voyage affects its flavor. Some
of the Ceylon tea ranks as high as the best
Chinese growth. A pound of what is
known as “golden tip," grown on a famous
estate in Ge ion, was recently sold in Lon
don for sl3sya pound.
New York Stock Market.
NEW YORK, Nov. 12. - Noon ‘ Money
easy at [email protected] per cent. Stocks dull,
stagnant, at smallfractions better than first
prices. Fours coupons, 16%; Pacilicfis. 11;
Atchison, 42; Central Pacific, 32; Bur
lington, 98%; Denver & RlO Granule, 17%;
Northern Pacific, 26%; Northern Pucmc
greferred, 70%; Northwestern, 15; New
ork Central,ll‘/§; Oregon Navigation, 73;
North American,l7%; Pacific ail. 35%;
Rock Island, 81%; St. Paul &. Omaha, 33;
Texas Pacific, 12%; Union Pacific, 41;
Wells Fargo Express, 39%; Western Union.
81%. i 7 77
For a New Trial.
J udgc Frank Allyn, of Tacoma, will prc
side in the superior court tomorrow for the
hearing ofa motion for a new trial Tn the
case of Jim. the Ullinaman. who is now in
the county jail.
( Wood and Bark.
All kinds of dry wood and bark for sale
by the nnflersigned, sizes to order. V
JOHN D. REAGH.
Office at Foster 66 Laberee’s. Tel. 3.
LARGEST CIRCULATION
Of Any Daily Newspaper West of Seattle
and Tacoma.
M
< EVENING EDITION‘
WATER RECEDIN G
THE HEAVIES'I‘ FLOOD KNOWN IN
Damage In King and Pierce Coun
tics—The N. P. Railroad a
I The water in the lowlands of the Puget
Sound country are snbsidingValthough
’ much of the land is still submerged. The
‘ storm badly crippled the Northern Pacific.
At Eagle Gorge, and at a point just after
reaching the western slope of the Cascades,
from one-half to one mile of track and
trestle has been either covered with iand
slides, washed out hymountail torrents,
and in other ways blockading travel and
impediugwthe progress of trains. An im
mense force of men has been sent to
the scene, and everything possible is being
done to repair the damamage and again
make the track serviceable. All business
from the east is transacted by the N. P.
road, by way of Portland, but gains will
berunning over the Cascades tomorrow.
The water has been higher in the Duwam
ish country than it has been known for
fifteen yearsand the farmers have sus
tained heavy losses in garden truck. The
damage to county bridges in King and
Pierce counties will reach MOOOO. Both
towns of Slaughter and Kent, in King
county, were inundated.
Wit 1 a view of preventing future wash
outs, a new channel will be either dredged
or blasted out, where the Pnyellup river
liows into the tide flats at the head of the
bay at Tacoma. The new channel made by
the throwing of a dam across at the St.
Paul and Tacoma mill, has not proved en
tireliy satisfactorv. While in a swollen
001 K ition the current of the river in the
new channel washes the banks of the river
to a considerable evtent. Yesterday a block
of lots, valued at SI,OOO per lot,were washed
out into the bayy and unless an additional
channel is constructed further damage is
feared. For the damage already done and
for the proposed new channel the Tacoma
Land Company and the St. Paul and
Tacoma Lumber Company will probably
settleafteradjustment.‘ -. M ,
Owing,r to this suspension of traffic on the
Cascade division wheat receipts are cut off
temporarily, but local wheat shippers are
amply prepared for this contingency. The
total bulk of grain now stored in Tacoma.
mnonnts to $1,000,000 bushels, which would
meet all ordinary demands, even if there
were no receipts whatever, until December
1. There are now loading three shi a,whic|l
will carry away about one-third o’gtlle Vis
ible supply here.
Jim Hill is hurrying to get into Spokane.
Judge Burke and his wife have gone to
Europe.
A fire last evening in Spokane entailed 11.
loss of $15,000.
Werner dz Nichuls, merchants of Lopez
have assigned.
“One incubus less,” is what the Fair
lmven Herald says of Senator Parkinson.
Skmnania county is the only one in the
state in which no newspaper is published.
Bids for building of the new irrigating
ditch, near Ellensburgh, have been calle
for. '
The Senttyle smugglers have a, gigantic
opium syndicate in lmlia to compete
with. ‘
A 46,?
THE p’o’fihrxifion of Shelboxr-ifincreua’mfi:
ritpidly. There is a boom in baby carriages
1: late.
. Edward T. Glynn whose head was re
cently crushed at the Aberdeen gravel pit
a few day ago is dead.
Tacoma is the proper place to hold the
Democratic National Nominating conven
tion, says the Salt Lake Trxbune.
The Northern Pacific ,intcndrmuking a
hard tight at Tacoma to keep the water
lront from falling into thehands of the
city.
Tacoma has an ordinance forbidding tlm
ringing of bells on the meets in from) of
busmess houses, under a pennlby ofs2s
line.
Spokane will be compelled to vote for
bonds again, the $1,200,000 issue having
beenbdeclured invalid, by the supreme
cour .
W. D. Connell’s barn nenr Kalanm was
destroyed by lire yesterday. Seventy-live
cows and fourceeu horses were consumed.
Loss SIO,OOO.
Hon. William H. Calkius will deliver an
address on “Reciprocity” at the next meet,-
ing of the Washington Repuclican club,
of Tacoma, this evening.
Clarkson is strong in his praises of Puget
Sound, but only smiled when asked about.
Tacoma as the place 1"or holding the Re
publican National convention.
Railroad men say that the Puget Sound
connnissiou men were were given a fifty—
cent rate on Walla Walla produce by car
load lots, but still continue to bring these
goods mostly from. California.
Mayor White, of Seattle, is opposed to
the fashion of sglmnuering large sums of
money in advertismg through tramp jour
nals t mt invade the state with a big noise
of drums.
Sam W. Wall, late of Tacoma, is now
city editor of the Boston Post and is get
ting out a. new, enlarged and beautiful edi
tion of his trig around the world with
Geerge Francis ’ rain.
“A Guardsman.” in the Oregonian writ
ing from (loldendale, says: “We are
touched with sorrow as we view With
shame some of the overt acts per etrnted
by officers of our state militia Wyn) don
the emblems of a soldier only to disgrace
the uniform they war. We say, let our
court martial in session at Olympia go on
with the good work until every egotistical,
undisciplined officer is weeded out of the
service.”
Press-Times: To abolish both Langhton'
and his office—if both can be done consti
tutionally, which we doubt—4s to do an
unprecedented, silly, childish thing. No
other motive could mapire such action but
that of revenge-«a. motive that does not
comport well with the decency, dignity
and fairness that should animate all' the
actions of the legislature of a great state.
Let all this talk about “abolishing” Laugh
ton he stopped. It is all chatter,
Fairhaven Herald: What a pity that
the Haines court-martial has adjourned
without determining whether the bellicose
colonel was at large as acivilian or as a
warrior when he assaulted Adiutant—Gen
emlO’Brien in the lobby oftxe Olympia
hotel some weeks ago. It is too bad to
keep the anxious populace in suspense in
a matter of suchnnportance. Inasmuch
as nearly all the oilicers of the first. regi
ment seem pugnaciously disposed toward
the adjutent—geneml it might be well for
him to wear a baseball mask until the
question is determined.
PASO Romnes, Caf, Nov. 12.—Judge John
Kershaw. yesterday and killed A. M. Sher
wood, defendant in a case which had been
tried before Kershaw. Bherwwod attacked
him and the judge shot him in self defense.
Calllornla Grain Market.
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 12.—Wheat, buyer
season, ’9l, $115914. '
FIF’J‘EEN YEARS.
Heavy Sutton-er.
FRESH S’l‘A’l‘EilE‘VS.
“It Is an Chatter.”
A Musk for O’Brlcn.
The Judge snofifim.

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