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Olympia tribune. (Olympia, Wash.) 1890-1893, November 23, 1891, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085350/1891-11-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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OFFICIAL PAPER
o——OF————o
The Cities of Olympia and Tumwater, and
Thurston County.
VOLUME 11. NO. :69 >
STARR.
Christmas Stock-I
GIVE HIM .A. CALL-
Buy your Watches at‘ CARYLON’S on Installments. l
' l
1.1—.1 emf-3f“ ‘'- ‘ ails...” . \x:i*“‘\- '
- « fill ll» :‘ll‘ll \é .- it ”71%
‘ 1::1Iy “if“ 1/ ALI/25% _;' ~. M: (\‘gw I, f; Wll;§‘
\§~‘s:\ll , 1 “sll, ..//1»
\. .... r,,;i'.v;;-.'.+.—::»“::: / \I/im ‘
- e
111 W C 81] 1011 Graduate of Chicago
I I Ophthalmic College.
I will examine scientifically and accurately by the most approved methods known to
modern science, all errors of Refraction, Hypermetropia, Myopia, Astigmatism, As
thenopia and Presbyopia, all who desire to have their eyes tested. Remember if you
need glasses, I guarantee to you a perfect and satisfactory fit. An elegant line of Opti
cal Goods constantly on ham .
References: Dr. A. B. Woodard, Dentist; Dr. C. L. Flannigan, Physician and Surr
eon; Dr. Ostrander, Physician; John Klebel‘, Lawyer; Dr. A. S. Oliver, Dentist; Dr.
RNarren Riley, Surgeon; J. R. Pattison, Cafitalist; Dr. J. S. Newcomb; Dr. J. P.
Jento, Physician and Surgeon; E. 0. McDonal .
Wm
l
Photographs at Home Day orNight.
“ QUIQKER THAN A WINK,” BY
ROGERS-HH’I‘HE PHOTOGRAPHER.
Being desirous of keeping pace With the times and to give my patrons the benefit
of the latest novelties, I am prepared to make INSTANT NEOUS PHOTOGRAPHS
of evening gatherings. dinner parties, drawing room and stage scenes, dark interiors of
stores, offices, etc. Where before it has been impossible to get a picture I can now by
this new rocess make you beautiful life-like photograhs wlthout trouble. Parties de
sirious ofpmy services can make engagements at my studio, Corner Main and Fifth
streets, Olympia.
__—_____.__—_.—__—_______
E. S . HORTON
r T
S ..I- E] AI“
—AND
. . GAS~FITTING. "
STOVES AND TIN WARE,
REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO
-424 Fourth Street. Telephone No. 13.
—————————.—___
MILLARD LEMON, PRESIDENT. MARY L. PAGE, SECRETARY.
ROBT. F. WHI'I HAM, TREASURER. F. G. BLAKE, MANAGER.
CAPITAL CIT Y
I
ABSTRACT & TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY.
(INCORPORATED)
Draughting and Blue Printing
Our Abstracts are posted to date every evening, and are the only complete set of Abstracts from
Government to date In the county.
Upstairs in Chambers Block - - - - Olympia, Wash.
-————-————-—_——
, Gr- NOSCI—IKA,
I I
Leading Merchant lallor.
--——-—-Always keeps a full assortment of—-——
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC GOODS. PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED IN EVERY CASE.
REPAIRING NEATLY DONE
—-—_——_—.______—
CRISMAN—SARGENT
COMPANY
216 THIRD STREET, OLYMPIA, WASH- l
l
C - BEARY,
GUN AND LOCKSMITH.
GENERALIRE‘PAIRING. ' -
CARTRIDGES LOADED TO ORDER. AMMUNITION OF ALL KINDS.
' Silsby Block, Main Street, Olympia.
OLYMPIA TRIBUNE
Stationery of All Kinds.
slnks, Mucilage and Wall Paper.
1 M; GEE—NOR
309 and 311 Main street, olympla.
THE BIG BAZAAR!
W. A. VAN EPPS, PROP.
Headquarters for Everything,
WALL PAPER AND
Ceiling Decorations
East 4th at - - - Olympia,“aahs
ROBERT FROST
HEAVY AND iSHELF ,
O
HAR D W AR E.
_.__o_
Wooden and willow ware, crockery and
glasmvarc, guns pistols, J'illes, all kinds of
anummitlon, munent. paint oils and win
dow glass.
OLM Y PIA.
Collegiate Institute
____o_
“The Pioneer School of W ashington.”
-——o—.
COLLEGE Counss, per term, - sl2.
NORMAL COURSE, per term, - I‘2.
COMMERCIAL COURSE, per term, 13.
GRAMMER COURSE, per term, - 8.
MUSIC, per term, - - - 12.
ELOCUTION, per term, - ~ 15.
STENOGRAPHY, per term, - - 10.
ART INSTRTCTION, per hour, - 250.
_o_.
The oiler of board, tuition and room rent for
$l5O per year in advance has already brought
about '75 students to Olympia from abroad. All
the priveleges and opportunities of the Institute
are open to the patrons of Oiympia for the price
of tuition alone .
A Faculty of nine Instructors and Eifecialists.
completely furnished boarding an lodging
halls, literary and debating societies and t or
ongh work in 9.11 departments are the advan
tages offered.
For further information call on or address
REV. LUTHER GOVINGTON,
PRESIDENT. ‘ ‘
m
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS.
G M. SAVAGE & CO.
I
CONTRACTORS.
Bridge Building and Pile Driving.
1 LIBERMAN'
O
CONTRACTOR. .
Grading and Bridging. Office: Room
8, Woodrufl block.
“I A. ROGERS
O
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Estimates made on application.
OLYMPIA - - - - - WASH.
J W. ROBERTS
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER.
Office fittings, counters, shelving and all
jobbing promptly attended to. stimates
furnished on application. P. 0. box 177.
OLYMPIA. WASH.
WEEKS & co
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS.
Plans and specifications furnished.
OLYMPIA AND TACOMA - - - - WAsII.
CARD & BROWN
GRADING'AND EXCAVATING.
Lot and land clearing done promptly
Camp on Westside on Fourth and liront
streets. .
OLYMPIA - WASH.
M
OREGON IMPROVEMENT 00.,
‘ “OPERATING THE——
‘Olympla & Ghehahs YalleyEßy
.___o.___
Time Card to tnke eflect Sunday Nov. 1. ,
b l
1
—.__.o——.._ ‘
NO. 1. ' ’
Leave............‘...01ympia............9240 a. m.
Arrive...............Tenin0............10:30a.m.
NO. 2.
Leave........,.......Tenin0............10:50 a. m.
Arrive............”01ympia”..........11:50a.m.
NO. 3.
Leave...............01ympia............3:50p. m.
Arrive...............Tenin0.............4:50p. m.
NO. 4.
Leave................Teuin0............5105p.m.
Arrive..............01ympia............5;55p.m.
___o_
Nos. 1 and 4 run daily. Nos. 2 and 3, daily ex
ce’Ft Sunday,
he mormng train makes close connection
with the Northern Pacific train from Tacoma
to Portland, and the evening train connects
with the train from Portland to Tacoma.
.1. C. PHELPS,
Ass t., Supt
OLYMPIA. WASHINGTON. MONDAcY. NOVEMBER 23, 1891.
BLANK BOOKS
FRESH STATE NEWI.
There was a genuine snow storm last
eek in the Skagit valley.
The Ellensburgh Registet is ten years
old. It is a. good weekly newspaper.
Electric cars have been put on the Point
Defiance road, Tacoma, superseding the
steam motor.
Bank clearances Saturday: Tacoma.
$298,947.15; balances, $54,418.00. Seattle,
$119,616.68; balances, $29,457.00.
The Shelton Sentinel: All oi our Mason
county farmers and settlers are putting
more land in cultivation for the coming
vear. Several thousand young fruit trees
have been received from the nurseries and
will be set out this season. There are no
flies on Mason county and no “wild cat
schemes” are being floated here. That is
why our county is in such good shape.
Miss Annie Schaefer, daughter of the
old time Steilacoom brewer, William
Schaefer, who died last month, left an es
, tate of $50,000. Among other bequests she
: leaves to John and Mary Leary of Seattle,
‘in' trust for the Ladies’ Relief society of
Seattle, $1,000; to Otto Ranke of Seattle, in
trust for the German Benevolent society of
Seattle, SI,OOO. ‘ ,
There was quite a demonstration at Pom
eroy recently on the occasion of raising the ,
flag over the schoolhouse. The entire town I
turned out, and interesting exercises 'werel
held. The children gained more respect
and love for the flag by seeing the honor
paid it by their elders than they could get
in any other way, and will never forget t 1e
lessons of patriotism learned on that occa—
sron. ,
E. Bacon, of Montesano, and Mrs. R. S.
Buck, of Boston, were married at the Ta
coma hotel yesterday afternoon. Mrs.
Buck came on from Boston to marry Mr.
Bacon, who is a wellknown Chehalis coun~
ty man. ' .
Arrangements are said to have been a]-
most completed for the transfer of the old
Oregon & Washington Territory ‘ railroad
in Eastern Washington and Oregon, and
better known as the Hunt system. to the
Northern Pacific railroad, to be made about
the first of the new year. i
The Press-Times sags: Eli-Governor
Miles 0. Moore wiel 5 what may very
properly be called a trenchant pen; and,
truly, as one of Judge Hilmes’ temporary
guests remarked. upon getting ten years
the other day, “Begorm, the pen is might
ier than the sword.”
”The Light that Failed” was at. the Na
tional Theater in Tacoma on Saturday
night. Cllne, who tried to run a National
Theater in this city and failed, on account
of want of patronage, met with disaster in
the City of Destiny. The light and water
company, to whic 1 he owed S3OO, turned
off the lights. It drove everybody into the
darkness.
[T WAS DEDICATED.
THE FIRST “ CHRISTIAN ’7 CHURCH
of OLYMPIA.
Services Yesterday—Location of 1
“is Church—Antonin Raised
and Still Due.
The First‘Christian church at the corner
of Adams and Union streets, was iormally
dedicated yesterday by the Rev.;William
J .Cowden of Tacoma, general etgsngelist
of the Northwest, assisted by Rev.J.S.
McGallum, pastor of the church. Rev. T.
J. Lamont and the Rev. Mr. Diven. There
‘ were also present the Rev. Mr. Douglas,
1 Rev. Mr. Pope and Rev. Napoleon Hoag—
-3 land. V
1 The church building occupies asightly
location at the northwest corner of Adams
and Union streets. It is 34 by 64 feet, the
main audience room being 30 by 52. In
the rear of the audience room are two
small rooms for meeting purposes. The
church is nicely finished and neatly car
peted.
The Christian society was organized in
March last, since which time they have
held services in the old school house on the
east side. Though there are but forty
eight members on the roll, their energy
and earnestness in their work is evidenced
by the fact that they have already built
for themselves a creditable church edifice.
The Rev. Mr. McCallum, who has been re
tained as the permanent Pastor, was for
two years in charge of the hirst Christian
church in Seattle. ,
The services opened yesterday in the
new building, with Sunday school at 10
o’clock. Mr. McCallum conducted the
morning services at 11 o’clock, preaching
upon the glorifying of God’s name. He
was assisted by Rev. Mr. Cowden. There
were nearly 250 persons present.
At3o’clock the dedicatory sermon was
Breached by the Rev. Mr. Cowden, the text
eing from St. Matthew, 16th chapter. 18th
verse. A full choir was present under the
‘leadership of Alfred Taylor. The service
‘opened with singing, followed with read
-2 ing by Rev. T. Lamont and prayer by Rev.
iMrJDiven. Mrs. Taylor rendered asolo
‘entitled “Christ is Risen.” After the ser
i mon a financial statement was made by
the building committee, of which the pastor
was chairman, showing the total cost of
the church to be $1,404.34. The cash in the
‘ church fund was $829.75, while at the servi—
ces Iyesterday $274 were raised, leavinga
tota indebtedness of about S3OO. Time
being short, the services were continued in
the evening, at which time a dedicatory
pralyer was offered by Rev. Mr. Cowden,
an all joined in singing “Lord of Host, to
Thee we raise.” Exgressions of thanks
were tendered to the uilding committee,
ißev. Mr. McCallum and Messrs. Jewell
‘ and Varner. The building was erected un
der the supervision of Mr. Jewell, of the
firm of Dent & Jewell.
Attorney Savage’s Lecture.
Last evening, at Tacoma hall, Mr. Geo.
Marvin Savage lectured on the “Causes
and Cure of Crime” under the auspices of
the First Unitarian society. The lecture
was well received and attentively listened
to. Mr. George Marvm Savage is a well
known attorney of this city and president
of the crime against the progress of Olym
pia known as the Main street horse car
“system," otherwise called “the Olym ia
street railway.” It is understood that 1811'.
Savage blames the city council for not hur
rying up the street imgrovements on the
Eastside so that the b 0 tail system can be
extended there, and that he does not in
tend to extend the road any fur—
ther south on Main street. The “system”
was not referred to in Mr. Savage’s admir
able lecture last evening. ‘
Not :1 Chicken Farmer.
1 While ex-Preefdent Hayes was in At
‘ lanta. he told a reporter that he had never
raised a chicken in his life. “The story of
the chickens was started by mg friends as
a joke,” said the president; “t ey begun it
for the fun ofit, and wishing Eerhaps to
belittle me in the eyes of t e public,
pushed the fake for all it was worth."
______.__._ ‘
lle Died Rich. ‘
Peter Cooper made it a point to put
away something from his wages in early
life every day. The consequence was he
died rich.
Yes, “he died rich" and left all he had.
oysters!
Go to Deming & Perry’s for fresh East
ern Oysters for Thanksgiving. nZ3-2td
HORRIBLE ACCIDENT
TWO MEN CRUSHED TO DEATH A'l‘
SIIELTON THIS MORNING.
The Results 01 Backing Up a Long
Logging Train in the
Dark.
Special to the Tribune.
Summon, Nov. 23.—Early this morning
at dark, while a logging train on the Wash
ington Southern, making its first trip, was
backing up to the camp to be loaded, the
empty trucks encountered a tree which
had fallen across the track during Sunday,
in a sand cut ten miles from here. The
. lodged on each side of the cut, forming a
‘ bridge. As the train backed the cars went
under safely, but, Brakeman Baptiste did
not discover the danger until it was too
late. He was struck a terrible blow,
thrown between the cars and horribly man
gled. James Leisure, who was standing
on the foot-board of the tender, was at- {
tracted by the short quick cries from his
unfortunate companion, but he no sooner
heard him than he too was struck. The ve
locity of the train and the force of the
collision knocked him against the tender
and was crushed beyond recognition. The
obstruction was too great for the engine
and brought it to a stand still. Baptiste
was brought to Shelton by the coroner, but
the mangled remains of Leisure were so
cut up that they could not be‘extracted un
til later, when they were brought in on the
train.
The accident has thrown a cloud of sad
ness over the entire town. The two men
were well known and stood high in the
community. Leisure was a young married
man, and his grief stricken wife is frantic.
Baptiste is a. young single man, and has
just returned from a trip around the world,
visiting relations in China and England.
This was his first trip as brakeman. Both
young men were steady and industrious,
and there is gloom in every household.
The remains will be interred tomorrow.
Barrett and Marie Wainwright.
It will be remembered that Marie Wain
wright was playing in Olympia when the
news of Lawrence Barrett's death was re
ceived here. She spoke kindly of the dead
actor. A writer in the New York Recorder
says: “Miss Minna K.Gale was originally
engaged to under-study Louis James’ wife.
Marie Wainwright. who at the time was in
delecate health. Une’day in Chicago, dur
ing rehearsal, Barrett lost his temper be
cause of James’ incessant guying and pub
licly reproved the actor. James took the
reproot good naturedly, fully aware it was
deserved. His wife, however, insisted that
he had been insulted and that an apology
was necessary. Mr. Barrett refused to
apologize and Mr. and Mrs. James. resigned
from the company. Minna Gale was forth
with installed as leading lady which posl
- she held up to the isbandmeut of the
organization upon the death of its projec
tor.
Not Bright in Politics.
A political writer in the Seattle Tele
graph, in referring to the Walla Walla.
convention, says-of the Seattle contingent;
"They wanted Kinnear, not Ferry, for
governor. So cleverly did they bid and
bargain that they won (1 have carried their
point had it not been for the Tacoma dele
gation, which, though promised for Kin
near, broke their troth after they captured
a judgeship, and went to Ferry, whose
managers were making some pretty scaly
bargains themselves. It was 'lacoma,
therefore, not Seattle, which named Ferry
as the candidate for governor;and inci
dentally, by that not they made Ferry’s
olitical partner, Squire, the Western
Washington senator. It was not a. bright
thing to do; but Tacoma republicans are
not given to brightness in politics.”
The Unity Club.
Late Saturday afternoon after THE TRXB
mm had been issued, Mr. Hoagland re
ceived a telegram from Rev. Thomas A.
Van Ness, that he would be in the city
this evening, and it was arranged by the
executive committee to give this eloquent
divine forty—five minutes, for the purpose
of hearing his celebrated ilecture “A Visit
to the ’l‘olstoi Residence in Russia.” The
place of meeting has been changed to Lib
eral (Barnes’) hall, on Adams street. The
hour of meeting has been fixed a 7:30
sharp. No admission fee will be charged.
Sgeaks on ’l‘olstoi Tonight.
Rev. Thomas Van Ness, formerly the
pogular pastor of Unity church, Denver,
an now the efficient superintendent of
Unitarian churches on the Pacific coast,
will occupy a place on the Unity Club
rogramme this evening at Liberal Hall.
file visited Tolstoi three or four years ago
and will speak tonight on “An Evening
with Count Tolstoi." His address will be
gin promptly at 7:30. All members of the
club and friends interested are invited to
attend. The hall is 011 Adams street, be
tween Fourth and Fifth—No. 418.
'l‘hose Electric Light Poles.
For many weeks poles belonging to the
Olympia Light and Power Company have
been permitted to lie in the gutters of the
streets after having been taken down with
the intention of movin§ them. Many of
them have the arms stil on them and care
lessst lie upon the pavement. While it
was growing dark Mrs. Paisley was coming
down Main street and caught her foot on
a projecting arm. She was thrown to the
sidewalk and sustained severe and painful
injuries about the face.
It Puzzled Him.
When City Treasurer Ames was told that
one member of the Salvation army had
shot another, he became thoughtful,and
at length soliloquized: “I wonder whether
court-martial oracivil trial will follow?
Were the combatants in army or civilian
attir?”eSpectator.
A Great Sale.
Ladies who have not purchased their
winter millinerg will now get great bar
gains. Trimme hats are reduced from $1
to $3, and all other goods .accordingly at
Mrs. J. Wright’s millinery parlors, corner
of Jefferson add Fourth streets. Ladies
don’t fail to call and see for yourself the
unparalled bargains. 1123-“
Salt and Sand.
Ohio’s'banner proudly floats
For Bouestfinonefv and protection——
A cry fo]: Wye?! wi 'l. win'th-e yptes
V Ixi'next yeaf’s hiéidfigl—é‘léclivdryx:
McKinlegpfigfied his all {ind won——
No candidate was ever braver:
And when the fight next year ia:done
His salt and sand will lend the savor.
—Philadelphia Press (Rep.)
At Death’s Door.
I was a great sufferer from Rheumatism
and Kidney and Liver trouble. My lungs
were also seriously affected. Doctors said
I could not possubly live. Seven bottles 0;
Hibbard’s Rheumatic Syrup with the Plas
ters entirely cured me. Hundreds of per
son’s in Creston, can vouch for the fact
that this medicine saved mg life.
nlB-tf WM. HARSIIAW, reston, lowa.
‘ For sale by Pacific Drug Co.
(iIIVEBNOR HOVEY IS DEAD.
1 INDIANAPOLIS, Nov. 23.—Governor Alvin
P. Hovey, of this state. died today of con
gestion of the lungs.
About three weeks ago Governor Hovey
started on a pleasure trip through the west
and Mexico. When the trip was about
half completed, the governor was_ taken
suddeniy HI and had to return home.
Governor Hovey was born in Posey
county. near Mount Vernon, Indiana, in
1821. He served one term in congress and
was elected governor in 1886.
Awful Earthquake in Japan.
YOKOHAMA, Nov. 23.—Fu1l details of the
terrible earthquake in Japan October 28th
have just been recived‘. It isa national
calamity. Four thousand people were
killed outright, 4000 wounded, 40,000
houses destroyed and 200,000 people ren
dered homeless. The shocks continued up
to November 6th and it isestimated that
6600 shocks have occurred.
SENATOR squuu: eons EAST.
Called to Ohio by the Sudden l Illness
, of His Mother.
SEATTLE, Nov. fail—Senator Squire has
receivedadispatch from his sister,‘Mrs.
1 Francis Joslin. at Clyde, Ohio, stating that
‘ his mother was very sick, and asking him
‘tocome at once if possible. The senator
‘ left this morning for her bedside. The
mother is over 91 years oldl and Senator
Squire is fearful that she will not survive
the sickness. It will take him about four
and one-half days to reach Clyde, provid
ing he meets With no delay. It was his
intention to go East in "about a week, as
congress convenes two weeks from today.
The unexpected defarture leaves his busi
ness affairs unsett ed, and he may come
back during the holiday recess for a short
stay. ‘
Bad Naval Architecture.
NEW YORK, Nov. 23.—The Times says
the metre. centric height of the crusier
Philadelphia is so low that she is only pre
vented from turning bottom up by carrying
all the water she can hold in her double
bottom space. Naval Constructor Min
tonye estimates the cost of the necessary
alterations at $205,000, and involves the
lowering of the practice deck. '
THE SPEAVKETRSHIP.
CRISP IS THE TAMMANY CANDI
DATE AND WILL WIN.
lulu. Does Not Meet With Favor——
What the Other Caucu
dates are Dnlng.
'WAsHING'rON. Nov. 23.—A special says:
The question of speakership, now that the
two leading candidates. Crisp and Mills,
have come to Washington, is beginning to
be the topic of conversation here. The out
come of the recent visit of the two gentle
men to New York seems to come up in‘ im
portance to all expectations. The talk cur
rent indicates that Crisp stock has taken a
hig jump upward in consequence of the
New York visit. The Crisp men do not
seem to have any doubt that he will be
elected on the first ballot in caucus. He
has pledged to him, they say, 107 votes that
can be counted on beyond the shadow of a
doubt.
They indignantly deny that there has
been anything like a. “deal” in his interest
in New York. They say the Tammany or
ganization is for him. Tammany con
gressmen are for him, and so we most of
the democratic congressmen in the state
outside of New York city. The other can
didates are still in the race,and there seems
to be no reason to doubt that the two for
mer, at least, willstay in it to the end. Mc-l
Millen's backers still think the light is so
close between mills and Crisp that it will
not be settled on the first ballot, nor for
several succeeding ballots, and they be
lieve McMillan stands the best chance of
being elected as a compromise candidate.
A SUNDAY RAID.
INSPECTOR JOHN M’ULELLAND
MAKES TWO SEIZURI‘IS.
The Chinese Venetuble Gardens 11
Riding Place for Smuggled
. Opium—A Chinamnu "
Arrested.
Two seizures of opium were made yester
day by John McClelland, who returned on
Saturday with his commission as customs
inspector, under the newly appointed col
lector, Andrew Wasson. He was endorsed
by Governor Ferry and many others, and
the collector stated that his recommenda
tions were stronger than any yet brought to
his notice. Mr. Mchelland no sooner re
turned than he set to work. Early yester
day morning, accompanied by his brother
George, he visited the garden of Hong
Yek, near the gas works. He found three
Chinamen there and placed them under
guard,in order that they could not give
the alarm to the others. He spent about
one hour and a half in overturning things,
and finally discovered fifteen cans of
opium hid away amongl sacks of vegeta
b es. The Chinaman, im Mough, made
every inducement for his release, but
he was taken to the county jail. Keep
ing the other two Chinamen under
guard he proceeded to another garden
about three miles east of here. and found
a'halfdozen celestials whom he placed in
the house. He then commenced another
systematic search covering three hours,
and unearthed 48 cans of opium, two tea
boxes packed with cigars and a large box
filled with what are supposed to be smug
gled dry goods. .The ofium was [packed in ,
axes and buried. obody c aimed it,
and conseéyentty no arrests were made.
Collector asson was telegraphed to, and
‘replied that he would come in person or
sendadepuly. The trial of Jim Mough
was fixed for 6 o’clock this evening.
Bus-Inn Wheat.
Sr. PETEBSBURG, Nov. 23.——There are at
Ipresent twenty-four grain ships at Odessa
‘loading with wheat, whose cargoes have
not yet been completed. The authorities
[have given permissron for these ships to
continue their loading until their cargoes
are completed, despite the fact of the
ukase prohibiting the export of wheat
from Russia goes into effect today.
Only Their “Gall.”
Avoid traveling concerns with only their
at,“ to recommend, and go to Olympia Dye
orks, 320 Third street. n24-tf
LARGEST CIRCULATION
Of Any Daily Newspaper West of Seattle
and Tacoma.
K EVENING EDITION.
AN AWFUL CYCLONE
11' STRUCK WASHINGTON 01w
_ WITH TERRIBLE DAMAGE.
Many People Killed—The Storm
Moving Up thé Atlantic Coast.
BALTIMORE, Nov. 23.——A telephone mes
sage just received from Washington reports
that a cyclone and waterspout struclt that
city. Seven persons were killed and Metze
root music hall. on Pennsylvania. avenue,
is on fire. The storm struck this city,
making telegraphing almost impossible.
Communication with Washington is cut
of} at present.
NEW YORK, Nov. 23.—A terrible wind
and rain storm is advancing up the coast-
Telegraphic communication with points
south of Washington has been interrupted
all morning and at 1 o’clock a dispatch was
received from Washington that the worst
storm ever experienced there is raging and
all wires in all directions are going down.
The next heard from the Capital was a dis
patch from Baltimore telling of a water
spout and loss of life. The storm is evi
dently advancing north, as all communi
cation with Baltimore is cut off.
CHICAGO, Nov. 23.—--To Editors and
agents: All wires lost to Washington. Ev
ery effort is being made to get news from
there. As soon as anything can be re
received will send bulletins.
PITTSBURG, Nov. 23.——A terrible wind and
rain storm struck the city this morning,
doing great damage, blowing down and
unrooliing houses everywhere.
An immense demonstration was held in
Lin’ierick in commemoration of the death
of the Manchester murtys.
, The majority for Honk (republican) over
Williams (democrat) for congress from the
Nashville, Tenn., district is about 8,000.
Half the business portion of the town of
Mlddlebnry, Vermont, was burned last
night. The loss will probably reach $150.-
000.
It is annouced that the condition of
Prince George of Wales has not changed
since yesterday, when his fever was sub
siding.
A fire last ni ht in Paragonld, Ark.. de
stroyed nnumger of business blocks and
stores. A heavy snow storm probably
saved the town from destruction. The loss
is estimated at SIO,OOO. ‘
The election to fill the seat for North
Leeds, in the commons, made vacant by
the appointment of Right Hon. W. L.
Jackson to the position of chief secretary
for Ireland, was held on Saturday. Mr.
Jackson was returned without opposition.
Four men were killed by a break in a.
conduit in East; New York yesterday.
Both New York and Brooklyn are on the
verge of a water famine.
The funeral of Comedian W. J. Florence
took place this morning in St. Agnes
church, New York. The ceremonies were
beautiful and impressive. Interment in
Woodland cemetery.
A special from Jamestown, N. Y., says:
The old Homestead hotel was burned t iis
morning. The flames cut oil" escape by
the stair-ways and the guests lowered them—
selves from the second story window.
Three servants and one child were burned
to death.
I’EIISHNALI'I'I ES.
The Union City Tribune says: Mr. and
Mrs. A. D. Whitney, of Olympic, has been
spending a few days at the Occidental. Mr.
Whitney always returns home after a. short
visit here fully convinced that this is the
coming pleasure resort on Puget Sound.
Louise Herrick Wall, of Aberdeen, con.
tributes regular] stories and sketches of
Western life to li}, V. Smulley’s Northwest.
Mrs. Well, who is a very accomplished
lady, is the wife of the editor of the Aber
deen Herald. She is the poet on the occa
sion of the assembling of the State Press
Association at Spokane next year.
Have you seen Leavenworth’s red but
caught at the court house? It is a natural
curiosity and is on exhibition at the Wash
ington club. Ed Stevens, Mark Reed and
others pronounce it wonderful.
Mr. Wm. E. Mclntyre, of Tacoma, and
Miss Lizzie 1). Johnson, of this city, were
(luietl married on the [Bth inst. by Rev.
". J. fiamont at the residence of Mrs. F. L.
Allen.
00]. James Hamilton Lews ex-U. 8. At
torney W. H. White, tax-Chief Justice
Roger S. Greene, T. O. Gilman, R. D. How
ard, Andrew F. Burleigh, A. G. Mcßride
and Charles E. Patterson 01' Scuttle, are at
the Olympia.
”Mrs. P. D. Moore, who has been seriously
ill for several days with bronchitis, is now
convalescent.
D. Robinson and wife of Elma, Judge
Scott and wife of Whatcom. W. I‘. Kellog
of Jamestown, North Dakota, are at the
Olympia.
'l‘llE LINCOLN SCHOOL BUILDING.
A Crack 'on the South Archway—No
Quite a little excitement was caused
among the parents of the Lincoln school
children today by the cracking of the
chimney wall. President Woodrufl', of
the 80001 board, telegraphed to Architect
Ritchie, who arrived this mornining.
While the crack is plain enough, it occu-rs
on the corner of the large furnace chimney,
which rises along the archway on the south
side of the building. The architect states
that it is not connected with the building
proper, and even were the crack to extend,
it would only result in the falling of the
brielrs fgemntheleorne‘r of the arch walls,
Miss McClurken, the principal of the
school, stated this! afternoon that she had
visited each class room, and found that
but few upils had remained away from
school. ’Fhe teachers did not feel at all
alarmed. Iron bands will be put around
the corner unlil summer, when the chim—
my will be rebuilt. At present the brick
work has been propped up. There is no
apparent danger.
The funeral of the 5-months old daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Gore occurred yesterday.
The circumstances surrounding the case
are sad. Mr. and Mrs. Gore and two chil
dren lived on a float at the foot of
Franklin street, and when discovered
all were suffering with fever and were al
most destitute. All but the youngest were
removed to the hospital, where
they are now being cared for.
Mrs. John Gimblet took charge of
the baby. She nursed the child and paid
allxlmsmble attention to it. but the child
diei afew days ago. Mr. (iimblet met all
the expenses of medical attendance and
those of the undertaker.
meagre Details.
'I‘I‘XIJ‘IGRAPHIC 'I‘A LES.
Apparent Danger.
The Right Kind of Charity.

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