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Olympia tribune. (Olympia, Wash.) 1890-1893, November 25, 1891, Image 2

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OLYMPIA TRIBDM}.
PUBLISHED EVERY EVENING EXCEPT SUNDAY.
OFFLCE: 509 and 511 Main street.
Advertising rates according to space or time.
Copy for changes of advertisements must be in
not later than 9 o’clock a. m. Those received af
ter that hour will be changed the following day. ‘
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION:
DAILY.
One year, bymai1........................... $7 00
Sixmonths, bymai1.............‘.......... 3 50
Threemonths, by mall 2 00
Delivered by carrier, per week. ....... ... . . 25
Delivered by carrier, ~per month. ..r..A .. .. 1 00
Single c0pie5...........4.................... 5
WEEKLY.
Oneyenr, bymai1.........................,. 1 50
len‘onths,by mall 1 00
Threemonths bymai1......... 50
Invariubly in advance.
Address:
THE TRIBUNE.
[Ollympwz7 W ash.
J. MILLSPAUGH, Busmess Manager.
a .
Capital of State of Washington.
Population 8500.
THE GENESIS 0F THANKSGIVING.
Since an annual Thanksgiving day ap—
pointed bv the president and the governor
of the several states and territories is now
one of the abiding holidays of our nation,
its origin and gradual evolution becomes
an interesting question to the general
reader.
The “Feast of Ingatherings” observed
among the Jews more than three thousand
years ago, is the earliest formal Thanks
giving known to history, and it is not un
reasonable to suppose that such national
observances constitute the suggestive
germ of all similar occasions that have fol- ,
lowed in their wake. As popularly under- 1
stood, however, our national Thanksgiving
undoubtedly had its origin among the
early colonists of New England. After
landing in December 1620, the Pilgrims be
gan immediately to look about for arable
lands. In the following spring they went
vigorously to Work preparing their grounds
for seed. Their summer‘s work was pros
perous and large crops rewarded them in
the fall. Moved by this signal evidence of
Providential care, Governor Bradford ap—
pointed a day for public praise and thanks
giving to Almighty God for his manifold
blessings. As the day was also to be sig
nalized by feasting and good cheer, he sent
men into the woods for game, in order
that, as the quaint record has it, the people
“might in a more special manner rejoice
together.” An abundance of well con
ditioned wild turkeys were brought in
by the hunters and irom this circum
stance comes the traditional “Thanksgiv
ing turkey” among American people to
day.
But the following years were not all so
prosperous. In 1631 the crops almost wholly
failed, Indian hostilities had been perpe
trated and the ranks of the settlers were
fearfully decimated. Gaunt Want and
wholesale massacre by the savages stared
the remaining colonists in the face.
At this critical juncture the governor ap—
pointed a day of humiliation, fasting and
prayer, that God might, peradventure, send
deliverance to the famishing people. On
the morning of the solemn day, as the set
‘ tlers were slowly wending their way toward
the little chapel, a. white sail appeared far
out in the offing and, wafted by a. fresh
breeze, the ship soon came to anchor. The
newcomer proved to be a supply ship from
dear old England, laden with all the com
forts of civilized life, evith not a few of its
luxuries.
As it were in a twinkling, the day of
fasting was changed into a day of feasting,
while abject supplications Were turned
into vociferous praise and thanksgiving.
The people felt that their;prayers had
been anticipated and, giving way to their
impassioned joy, strong men sobbed like
children.
The chastened colonists. for many years
after this event, observed annual Thanks
giving days. 01d records are extant
which cite that such days were
duly observed by official appoint—
ment, in the years 1633, 1634, 1637, 1638 and
1639. But either on account of breaks in
the record or other reasons, the practice
seems not to have been continuous and as
new generations arose Thanksgiving days
seem wholly to have gone out of vogue.
It is a matter of history, however, that
the early Dutch governors of New York,
occasionally appointed such. days on spe
cial occasions, and so did the English gov
ernor in 1764. During the war of the Revo
lution, an annual Thanksgiving day began
to assumes. marked significance and the
custom was recommended by congress, but
still there was lacking the one great essen
tial {of national unity in the movement.
After the general Thanksgiving for peace,
in 1784, there was no similar public observ
ance till General Washington recom
mended. at the suggestion and request of
congress, that a day of public thanksgiv
ing should be held by the people, on ac
count of the adoption of the constitution
in 1787. Washington also issued a procla
mation for a day of public thanksgiving‘
on the occasion of the suppression of inter- 1
ml insurrection.
Congress having requested it, President
Madison proclaimed a day of public
thanksgiving for the restoration and ratifi
cation of peace in 1815. Public thanksgiv~
ing days have been held in the New Eng
land states for more than a. century, with
little or no interruption in their annual
continuity, and. to the people of these
states are we indebted fer the peculiar re
ligious spirit which pervades such occa
sions. ,
Thanksgiving days have been regularly
observed in New York since the year 1817.
In 1855, Governor Johnson, of Virginia,
appointed a. day for public thanksgiving,
but when Governor Wise, of the same
state, was requested by the people to make“
a similar appointment he declined. on the
ground that a. state government had no
constitutional right to interfere with re—
ligious matters. In 1853 the governors of
eight southern states proclaimed a day of
public praise and thanksgiving. ‘
It is Well known that in 1863 President
Lincoln proclaimed a day of public humil
iation and prayer "for all loyal people,”
and since that time there has been a regu
lar recurrence of the day all over the
United States. On account of' some still
disputed precedent, custom has ordained
that our national Thanksgiving shall fall
on the last Thursday in November.
Very Rigky Experiment.
Philadelphia Préss: -“Why, Charley,
What an awful cold you’ve got!”
“Yes, Maud, it is a bad one.”
“How did you catch it 'l’”
“Well, we’ve been having flannel cakes
every morning, and”—
“Yes.”
"This morning we switched over on to
. ~_l___+~_¢ om: nnnunn tn nknno-n frnm
A BORN EDITOR. ‘
He jest knew all about it—jest laid ’em on
the shelf.
Could run the paper better than the editor
himself;
Could write the blamed best stories an’ tell
the biggest tales— ,
Fer he was born fer editin’ and not fer
splitin’ rails! .
”Put this here in yer-paper,” he sez; “twill
make her hum;
Jest out a lively caper, an’ the cash is
bound ter cum! ‘
Here’s what’ll fetch the people—l’ve wrote
the very piece— ‘
’Twill stir the whole blame village as slick
as axle grease!"
Au’ so the editor resigned an’ put him in
as boss,
An’ then he rode the paper like he would a
Texas hoss;
Jest pitched into ’em lively—they couldn’t
make him cease—-
He stirred the whole blamed village, an’
they lynched him slick as grease!
—Atlanta Constitution.
——_—_—_
The Keeley Cure and the Mines Case.
- Washington Post: The recent death of
Dr. John F. Mines, of New York, from the
eii'ects of alcoholism, alter what was sup
posed to be a permanent rescue from his
urevious habits of intemperance through
the Keeley treatment. proves nothing and
disproves nothing that is claimed for that
treatment. His lelapse is snoken of as the
first authenticated failure oi' the bichloride
of gold remedy to do its peri‘ect work. It
stands alone against hundreds and hun—
dreds of authenticated cases of success. It
does not prove that these hundreds and
hundreds of cases will some day all go the
same way, nor does it disprove the efficacy
of the treatment. That these cases stand
even temporarily redeemed is its vindi
cation. ’l‘hat in one case it failed is not
an argument against it of such ‘
force as to warrant its condemnation. The 1
‘ Keely cure simplv assumes to overcome ‘
- the appetioe for drink. Ithas done that——
_ it is doing it every day. There may be
_ diseased conditions that it does not al
’ ways eradicate. It certainly does not
' eliminate from alcohol its intoxicating
- qualities. nor can it avert the imminent
. and awful danger that confronts the man
' Who once having lost his desire to drink,
’ hazards its rcawakening upon an over-con
' fidenoe in his own strength, or for medical
or other reasons ventures to tamper with
_ the enemy. The Keely treatment speaks
‘ foritself for the time being. It will not be
3 proved a failure until all its converts be
; come backsliders.
About Time to Fight.
The Spokane ReVIeW says of the republi
cans of this state: “They are fighting in
every large town and city in the state,
fighting themselves and fighting each
other, and when phrty leaders are that far
gone, only two ean‘thl)v remedies can please
them—a. sound drubbing by the democ
racy, or the killing off before the campaign
of most of the disturbing elements and the
elevation of new timber to the leadership.”
Isn’t it about time to tight to purify the
arty wnen such men as Boss McGraw, of
geattle and Finch, of Chehalis county, are
on the state central committee. Mch-aw
is credited with saying that he intends to
make the fight of his life in the next sena-‘
torial election for John B. Allen.
Grandmother.
Who knits such soft mittens and weaves
a web of love into the stitches that makes
them ever unlike ordinmy mittens? The
needles click and gleam in the flrelight
anon-~they cease for amoment—-and hush!
Grandmother sleeps I
She has borne the burden and heat of the
day. and she is taking the rest that comes
with the twilight.
Baby McKee’s Crib.
The crib which has just been shipped
from Indianapolis for the White House, to
be occupied this winter by “Baby McKee,”
was the bed of President Harrison when an
infant. It has been in the possession of
the family. according to the Cincinnati
Enquirer. for 70 years. and it was made by
the president’s uncle. It is of black walnut.
It Was of Kansas City Brand.
Indianapolis News: - A man in Kansas
City lighted a. cigar, commenced smoking
it and then shot himself. The brand of the
cigar is not stated.
“Geyman
Syrup A
For children a medi-
A Cough ‘ cinel should the abs:
lutey relia le.
and Group mother must be able to
Medicine. pin her faith to it as to
her Bible. It must
contain nothing violent, uncertain,
or dangerous. It must be standard
in material and manufacture. It
must be plain and simple to admin
ister; easy and pleasant' to take.
The child must like it. It must be
prompt in action, giving immedi
ate relief, as childrens’ troubles
come quick, grow fast, and end
fatally or otherwise in a very short
time. It must not only relieve uick
but bring them around quiet, as
children chafe and fret and spoil
their constitutions under long con
finement. It must do its work in
moderate doses. A large quantity
of medicine in a child is not desira
ble. It must not interfere with the,
child’s spirits, agilpetite or general
health. These t ings suit old as
well as young folks, and make 80-:
achee’s German Syrup the favorite‘
family medicine. QM
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
GEO. S. ARMSTRONG, M. D., L. R. C. 8.,
(Edin. Oflice Chambers’ block, residence,
Olympia Hotel, Telephone no. 1.
DR. HAL MI. WYMAN, Physician and Sur~
geon—Office hours: 10 to I‘2 a.m., 1 to 3 and
111:0 §3p.m. Chilberg block, Olympia. Telephone
0. '_ .
DR. M. L. ADAMS, oifice rooms E, Chambers
block. Residence, Third street, between
Tullis and Bethel street, Eastside. Otfiee hours,
10m 12 and 2 to 5 p.m. -
DR. GEO. W. INGHAM—Office, Turner Bloc];
comer Fourth and Main streets.
DR. KINCAID, oflice over Toklal & Kauf
mar‘s. Residence. cor Jefferson and 18th sts.
Olympia, Wash . -
DR. J. F. WATT, oflice, rooms 4 and C. Cham
bers’ block. Residence between Franklin
and Tenth street. Oflice hours, 10 to 12 a. m., 2
to 4 and 7toß p. 111. Telephone 62.
C P. JENTO, M. D. C. M. Oflice, Chambers
. Block, Oflice hours, 10 to .12; 2m 5; 71:0
9. Telephone N 0.30. 77
DENTISTS.
A B. WOODARD, dentist, Main street, Cham~
. berg’ block.
P H. CARLYON, D. D. 8,, dental rooms cor
bl .li ner Main and Fifth. opposite Odd Fellows"
oc .
A S. OLIVER, surgeon dentist». Teeth ex
. emeted without pain. Goldplates.crown
and bridge work a specialty. Office in Stuarts
an...” nnr‘nar Main and Sixth streets Olympia
OLYMPIA. WASHINGTON, WENEDSDAY, NOV. 25, 1891.
S6O R EWA RD 1
Free For Two Months.
Every lady sending us the names of 20 house
keepers will receive a copy of THE HOME MAG
AZINE FREE for two months.
To thosewho may be desirous of sending us
more than 20 names, we ofler'the following cash
prizes for the largest lists received, viz:
For the largest 1i5t..........................520.00
“ “ next largest 1i5t..................... 10.00
“ “ third “ “ 5.00
” “ fourth “ “ 3.00
“ “ fifth “ “ 2.00
“ “ next ten largest lists. SI.OO each... 10.00
' " “ “ twenty laugest lists, 50;. each.. 10.00
RULES GOVERNING THE COMPETITION:
‘ 1. All names must reach us not later than De
eember Ist, and all prizes will be mailed not
later than December 1 .11.
2. Put the names of ihose living in different
towns on separate sheets of paper, giVing the
name of the state and county in the top raght~
hand corner, and the number of names contained
on the sheet in the top left—hand corner. Thus:
' 4 KANSAS,
Mrs. Henry Brown, Olathe.
“ Amella Duggan,
“ Charles Semple, box 310,
" Amelia Warren.
3. Give the total number of names contained
in your list in the letter accompanying the same.
4. Be careful to write as distlnctly as possible,
and on one side of the paper only.
Names of the PRIZE WINNERS will he an
nonnced in JANUARY, 1892, number of THE
HOME MAGAZINE.
The Brodlx Pubhshmg Co_
Washington, I). C.
PROFESSIONAL. \
K P. FITCH
O
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Rooms 2 and 3, . - Turner Block.
OLYMPIA. WASH.
Wm. S. Church Dav E. Baily.
Chas. E. Laughton.
BAIL Y, LAUGHTON & CHURCH
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
Rooms 5 and 6 - - Talcott Block,
Main street, Olympia.
J. P. MOORE. GEO. A. ALLEN.
MOORE & ALLEN
3 > ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
‘ Rooms 5 and 6 - - Turner Block,
Olympia, Wash. .
Practice before the Supreme Court a ‘
specialty.
'l‘. v. EDDY, M. J. GORDON.
l
EDDY & GORDON
{ATTORNEYS ATgL-AW,
OLYMPIA, - - WASHINGTON.
ALLEN, AYER & FRANKLIN
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law.
Rooms 5, 6 and 7 - - - Horr’s Block,
OLYMPIA, WASH.
MILO A 3001‘. JOHN R MITCHELL
ROOT & MITCHELL ‘
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Office rooms 2 and 3, Odd Fellows Temple,
OLYMPIA, WASHJ .
HOMER C. ATWELL
, ATTORNEY AT LAW. ’
Turner Block, corner Main and Fourth st.
OLYMPIA, WASH.
J W. CRAWFORD
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
No. 120 Fourth st., Williams Block, op-
Eosite the McKenny Block. Sgecial atten
ion given to criminal and ivorce pro—
ceedings. Will also lElllractice before local
and general Land 0 ces, and prosecute
pension and bountv claims.
J C. RATHBUN
Q .
LAWYER AND JUSTICE OF PEACE.
Prompt attention given to collections.
Lands rendered and taxes naid for non-res
idents. Conveyancing. Rents collected.
South side Fourth st., between Main and
Columbia. Choice residence lots for sale.
FRANCIS HENRY
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Proprietor of Thurston county abstract,
the oldest in the state.
OLYMPIA - - - WASH.
E B. SIMMONS
I
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
Rooms 14 and 15. - . - Stuart Block.
OLYMPIA. WASH.
JOHN C KLEBER
LAWYER.
Turner Block, 001‘. Fourth and Main St.
OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON.
EM 1
0 V. LINN i
- l
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Williams’ Block, ‘
OLYMPIA - - - WASH.
F. W. TINKI-IAM
-—-DEAY.ER IN—--
Beef, Mutton, Pork and Veal.
i '—CHOlfiE——
HAMS, BACON, LARD, BUTTER
AND EGGS.
_ g__ -
Poultry of all kinds. Choice Vegetables
in their Season.
Silsby’s Block, Main St, Con, 7th. Tel., No. 88
STEAMER “THE DOCTOR”
TOWING AND J OBBING
d d . A 1 t H. M.
miié’éf‘géififtfi’SlE 33.01.. p%?0.%0x 234.
OLYMPIA
ADVERTISE
._ IN ._..
rer. Tribune- 1. '
DO YOU DESIRE TO BUILD A HOME ‘!
If so, subscribe for stock in the Olympia
Building dz Loan Association, an organiza
tion confined exclusively to Thurston 00.
Capital stock, $500,000; par value S2OO.
Monthly payments, sl.
Trustees—T. C. Van Epps, J. R. Chaplin, Jo
seph Chilberg, John McClennan, E. W. An
drews, C. J. Lord, Homer 0. Atwell, S. C. Wood
rufi" and A. W. Wisner.
‘ Let us see what it will cost 1X0“ on the sup
position that your stock will e worth par in
seven years:
With five shares of stock and on approvedse
curity, you will be entitled to a loan of SIOOO.
Your monthlg dues will be $5 and your monthly
interest will e SB, making a total monthly pay
ment of sl3. Your total monthly payments for
seven years will be $1,092. To this we will add
as the result of competitive bidding, a premium
of say 15 per cent., or $l5O, making the total paid
by you in seven years $1,242, from which de not
the amount you received, SI,OOO, and we have
the total interest paid by you in ‘seven years,
$242. You will see that this is a. trifle less than
31/ per cent. per annum. ,
filo Building and Loan Association located ‘
outside oi our own city and pretending to do
business here can oticr the same securit and
benefits that our local Association can give to
investors, and we would request all persons in
tending to take stock in outside Associations to
investigate our methods before investing.
Foreign Associations are generally operated
not with the intention of melon? loans, but
rather with the expeetation that ho ders of stock
away from the home otlice will forfeit their in
vestments to a few managing members.
Our Trustees are all elected at home from
among our our members, and each stockholder
fientitled to one vote for. every share owned by
in.
Our officers are under proper bonds, and our
books are always open for the inspection of all
stockholders.
Further information will be furnished on ap
plication.
:A. W. WISNEH, Secretary,
303 Fourth street
A FREE TRIP
—TO ,THE—
WORLD’S FAIR
COMMENCING MAY 1, 1893
The History Company of San Francisco,
Cal. (capital stock $500,000) the oldest and
largest publishing house on the Pacific
Coast, this day announce that they will
give.‘ ABSOLUTELY FREE, 3 ticket to the
World‘s Fair and return, including meals
enrou te one week (7 days) hotel accommo
dations, six admission tickets to the expo
sition grounds, two tickets to leading
Chicago theatres and such other privileges
as may insure a pYeasant trip, to deserving
persons, who comply with their require
ments. \
NOTICE
Those desiring to go to the World’s Fair
and who could not otherwise do so, can ad
dress us at once for full particulars. This
offer does not apply to~persons of means
who are in a position to meet the expenses
of such a trip themselves, but to enterpris
ing, intelligent young men and women who
‘ can appreciate such an opportunity and
‘ make the most of it. Teachers, clergymen,
‘ students, farmers’ bright sons and daugh
ters, in fact any all possessing energy, en
terprise and character will be eligible.
THE CHANGE or A LIFETIME. ‘
Every young man or woman who desires ‘
to go to Chicago and see the wonders of the
greatest exhibitions the world has ever
known, should address us at once. Such
an opportunity is rarely offered and the
trip will be the event ofa life time to those
who go. Address
THE HISTORY COMPANY
THE ms'rany BUILDING
723 Market St, San Francisco, Cal.
I
—. C 6:.
Chm stmas -———2%
= P '
1% rem l L! ms.
. %
m
——_.___
TRIBUN E.
_.__.._
. __ ”——
THE PRICE IS GOING UP.
——o~———-
The WEEKLY TRIBUNE will be great
ly improved and on January lst, 1892, the
subscription price will be raised from $1.50
to
$2- PER YEAR.
Until that time, special inducements will
be offered to new subscribers, and those
who desire to renew before their subscrip
tion expires,
WE ‘WILL GIVE
PREMIUM NO. I.
The WEEKLY TRIBUNE for one year
to any person who will bring in three new
subscriptions.
PREMIUM NO. 2.
Any person bringing m six new subscrip
tions, will receive a $2. Pocket Knife, or any
other article of the same value, to be
selected from the stack of any Olympia
merchant who advertises in the TRIBUNE.
PREMIUM NO. 3.
To any person bringing 11) ten new sub~
scriptious, we will give a course of one term
in Stenography, or one term in the Gram
mar Course, at the Olympia. Collegiate In
stitute.
PREMI UM NO. 4.
To any person bringing in fifteen new
subscriptions. we will give one term in the
College Course,Normal Course, Commercial
Course, Musical, Elocution or Art, at the
Olympia Collegiate Institute.
PREMIUM NO. 5.
To any person bringing in twenty-five new
subscriptions, will be given two terms in
any one course, or one term in any two
courses at the Olympia Collegiate Institute,
or a Silver Watch to the value of sls. Pre
-1 miums Nos. 4 and 5 can be transferred to
i any person designated by the one bringing
in the new subscriptions.
.___o___
The WEEKLY TRIBUNE contains the ‘
news of the week from all parts of the world,
It is brim full and boiling over-with bright,
crisp items of interest to the house-wife,
the merchant, mechanic, farmer, laborer,
student and professional man.
PER X JAR—~—
$l -50 ——lN ADVANCE. $ 1 -50-
$
”Make all remittances to the
TRIBUNE PUB. CO.
. ' Olympia, Wash.
FROM TERMINAL 0R INTERIOR POINTS
MEE—
To I .
l\ orthern Paclflc R R.
‘ is run: LINE TO TAKE
TO All POINTS EAST and SOUTH.
It is theDiuing Car route. It runs through
Vestibuled Trains every day
in the year to
ST. PAUL AND CHICAGO
0
(N 6 ensues: or ous.)
Comlposed 01 Dining Cars, unsurpassed,
ullman Drawing Room Sleepers
of latest equipment.
_—_.o-—_
TOURISFS SLEEPING CARS.
Best that can be constructed and in which
accommodations are both FREE and
furnished to holders of first and
second class tickets
and
ELEGANT DAV COACH ES.
-—-o-—-
A continuous Line connection with Lines
all afl'ording
. «fl. . .
Directs Uninterrupted Seance.
. Pullman Sleeper reservations can be se
cured in advance throu h any agent.
of the maxi *
‘ '1 r i ‘1
THROUoH TICKE l b
x
To and from all points in America, Eng-l
‘ land and Europe can be pur
chased at an)
TICKET OFFICE OF THIS COMPANY.
...—o..
- ' Full information concerning rates, time
of trains, routes and other details furnished
on application to any agent, or;
A. n. onnnuroiv,
Assistant General Passenger Agt.,
No. 121 First st., co , Washington,
, Portland, Oregon'
F. P: REYES, Agent.
Olympia. Wash
0 d' P 'f'
RAILWA Y
SAVE $5.00 to SIO.OO. Arrangements have
now been completed between this company
and the B. B. &. B. C. By. 00. whereby
passengers to and from Puget Sound ports
_ and Oints south will be sent via our Mis
' siongranch, which extends from Mission
Junction. on the Main line, to Hunting
don, on the boundary, and the B. B. & B.
O. Ry., which extends thence to New What
com. Wash.
I The service between New Whatcom and
lower Puget Sound ports will be daily, the
Canadian Pacific Navigation Company’s
steamer Premier and Eastern Oregon, mak
ing alternate trips.
. o
. Empress of China
Sails Dec. 16 from Vancouver, B. C.
1 For full particulars call on or write D. E.
) Brown, Assistant GeneralPassengerAgent,
‘ Vancouver, B. C.
A. W. Wisner, Agent,
303 Fourth Street.
----.-THE------
_M\.__
'I'UM W A'I'ER.
——o—-——
THE TRIBUNE will be delivered to all
subscribers regularly, with fresh
telegraphic and ocal news.
_o_
Tumwatcr’s official Paper.
_o__.
. Leave all subscrifiions and communica
tlons with the TU WATER DRUG 00.,
sole agents for the DAILY AND WEEKLY
TRIBUNE.
____.___._—____
E C. BICKFORD J; CO.,
.
NEW AND SECOND HAND GOODS
Bought and sold ior cash. See our prices be
fore buyirrfi. Corner Fourth and Columbia, sts.,
Olympia, ash.
8 Delivered to any part of the $8
city at $8 per I,UOO feet.
5idewa1k1umber.......................$ 9
5urfaced................................ 10
’N
G- D - ALLEN
I THIRD AND JEFFERSON ST.
W
JOHN conxrsn, c. z. MASON, E. s. HAMLEN,
Pres.-Gen. Man. Superind’t Seen'l‘reas.
THE PUGET SOUND PIPE COMPANY
Sole proprietors and manufacturers of Horton s
petent thin shell wood water pipe.
Banded to stand any de
sired pressure.
Guaranteed to be more durable than iron
pipe in the market. Olympls,s.ny
Washington.
_._.__._.__~_________
4.5.9:: :._ J. 1313 Gis acknowledged
$31.5... ‘ 71:355.;- the leading remed for
~-1":€:-‘:" Cures In Gonorrhoen dcflieet.
,“fggfizfib '; {fie only sizlue rem‘e‘gly for
i-"-‘~’:’ "' neon-r (9801' ites.
Q “m sm‘m' I m‘escrl’be it and feel
a: mum, hy safeln recommendingit
.. Tuafivmcnsmcuco. to all suffemrs.
.T-, mucmummgw" ;.- A. J. STONER, M. D.,
w; U.B.A. 53:; Sold by gngn'gf'
,1: r ggis
Tm: '1133 lurk - PRICE SI.OO.
MARE & ROSS Agents
YOU WA N T
'_A__._
‘1 ‘ -
ban Franclsco Newspaper
And of course you want a good one.
*o—
Weekly Examiner fills that want
completely, for it is the best. It gives you
every week not only the news, but the best
literary and miscellaneous matter published
on the American continent—that is its
specialty; being the best. It wants your
subscription—yours particularly—and of
fers not only to you. but to every other sub
scriber, one or more attractive premiums.
In the first place it gives to every sub
scriber, one of the four magnificent paint
ings or etchings described be ow, and die
livers it safely at his address, postage paid:
“The Retreat from Mommy/3’" _ ‘
7 W WW" by Meissonier.
“The Roman Chariot Racq,” _ ___
by A. Wagner.
Each of these pictures is 21x28 inches,
and they axe elegantly reproduced in fac
simile, showing every tint and color of the
great originals, either one of which coul
not be purchased for SIOO,OOO.
“Women and Children Eirgy.” » __
:by C. Napier Hemy.
"Christ Leaving the Praetorium,"
by Gustave Dore. -
Each of these pictures is reproduced in
photogravure, size 21x28. and eminently
fitted for framing, and will adorn the walls
of_§he_mos§ I'efi_l_led house: _ A
Each subscriber has the choice of any
one of these four ictures, which will be
mailed him in a tuEe direct from the Ex
aminer office, as soon as the subscription is
received. _ > ~ 7
In the second place it will give 5000 pre
miums, valued in the aggregate at about
$125,000, to its subscribers this year. If
there are 50,000 subscribers, one in ten will
get one of these premiums; if there are
SIOO,OOO only one in twenty. But no'mat
ter how many there are, each and every
one of these premiums—which range m
value from 50 cents to s6ooo—will be given
absolutely without cost to some of those
who have paid $1.50 for the WEEKLY
EgSIAMHINER for one year. . ‘ .. ‘
The Examiner is thoroughly responsible,
as you know, or as Wells, Fargo & Co. or
any bank or commercial agency in San
Francisco will assure you. and the leading
men of the city will see that its premiums
are distribute exactly as agreed and that
everv subscriber no matter where he is lot
gatea, will receive just What is assigned to
Im.
Of course you want your home paper also,
and you can just as well as not save a. little
money by takina the EXAMINER with it.
The price of the WEEKLY EXAMINER
is $1.50 per year, including the premium.
picture and your share of the $125000 list
of premiums, which are fully described in
the twelve page Premium Supplement,
which will be sent free upon ap lication to
W. R. fiEARST,
Publisher, San Francisco, Cal.
The Examiner and THE WEEKLY TRIBUNE
the combined price of which is $3, will be
sent you for one year‘ postage paid, for
$2.50. Send the monev to the TRIBUNE and
your subscription will be promptly for
warded to the Examiner, and you will re
ceive therefor the Examiner’s numbered
receipt. You can get a Premium Supple
ment by applying at the TRIBUNE oflice.
THE TRIBUNE,
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for Infants and Children.
“Cast 1 dais so well adapted to children that
I recommend it as superior‘to any prescription
known to me.“ E. A. ARCHER, M. D.,
11180. Oxford st., Brooklyn, N. Y.
“ The use of ‘ Castorla. ’ is so universal and
Its merits so well known that. it. seems a. work
of supererogation to endorse it. Few are the
intelligent families who do not. keep Castoria
within easy reach.“
CARLOS MARTYN D. D.,
New fiork City.
Late Pastor Bloomingdale Reformed Church.
_ TACOMA ADVERTISEMENTS. 7
J. N. LOFSTAI FUR COMPANY
———-—IMP.ORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS’OF—fl
FINE - FURS
0--RAW PURS BOUGHT-—-0 A»
The Making of Seal Garments a Specialty. ‘
c. LOFSTAD, Agent, 939 c Street, Tnconla, Wash. " ‘3
MW
+i~ PUGET SDUN D BREWERY-b
1 i V
' SCI—IOLL &. HUTI—I, Prop.
Tacoma - - - - - Washing ton.
——.___________________
Music and. Instruments.
'
Standard and Popular Sheet Musm‘La‘test Soigs and Piano Music. All Kinds}!
Instruments, Strings and Fittings. ‘3
A- A- TAYLER 85 CO" 910 13 STREET, TACOMA, WASi

I
Subscilbe for THE TRIBUNE.
ADDRESS
OLYMPIA.
Castoria cures Colic, Constipation,
Sour Stomach, Diarrhuaa. Emctation, _
Kills Wprms, gives sleep, and promotes dr
mgestlonl . . .
W 1 out inJunous medlcatlon.
“ For several years I have recommended
your ‘ Castoria, ‘ and shall always continuefio fi -
do [538.31% has invariably produced beneflclal
res s.
Enwm F. Pmrma. M. D., we
“The Winthrop." 125th Street and 7th Ave.,
New York City. &
Tm: Gunman Comm, 77 MURRAY Smear, N w You. '

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