OCR Interpretation


The Evening statesman. [volume] (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, September 06, 1904, Image 4

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085421/1904-09-06/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for FOUR

NUMBER FOUR
Ihe Evening Statesman
Published by
THE STATESMAN PUBLISHING CO
PERCY C. HOLLAND, Manager.
Offfoe, No. 9, Third St., Near Main.
Telephone Main 12S.
One year (delivered by mail) In
advance ' 6 0#
Elx months * 60
One month, by carrier 50
One week, by carrier IB
Subscribers who do not get their
papers will favor us by reporting at
the office.
The complete telegraphic news ser
vice printed in these columns daily Is
furnished by
SCRIPPS-MRAE,
and Is by far the best report pub
lished in Walla Walla.
CITY OFFICIAL PAPER
NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS.
Copy of change of advertisement
must be delivered to the business of
fice by the hour of 10 o'clock a. m. to
insure insertion in the issue of even
date.
Business men generally seem to be
in favor of an extension of the paving
district to Poplar street on the south
arid Hose street on the north. It would
certainly a.hi much to the appearance
of the business district and would
make it much easier to keep the pave
ment fiee from the mud dragged in
from the outlying streets.
It makes no difference to the oppo
nents of the railroad lobby whether
Albert E. Mead is tiie candidate of J.
EX. Farrell of the Great Northern Kail
road or of !:. S. Grosscup of the North
ern Pacific railroad. It is enough to
know that he is the railroad candidate
and thai his election would mean an
other base of power for the predatory
corporations that have had control of
the government of this state almost
continuously since its admission to the
Union in 1889. In truth. Mead is the
candidate of both Farrell and Grosscup
who have formed a political merger
that is just as dose and binding as the
merger of the railroads that they rep
resent was intended to be.
NEW ROAD LAW IGNORED.
fanners generally agree that the
roads are now in the worst condition
they have been for many years. Few
of the roads have had any work done
on them since the new road law went
into effect. This neglect is not the
fault of the new road law hut is due to
the Slipshod methods followed by the
county commissioners. who have
ignored the provisions of the law and
have let contracts and bought supplies
regardless of the requirements of the
law and according to their own sweet
will, instead of Jetting contracts to
file lowest and best bidder, the com
missioners have awarded contracts for
road work and eiders for supplies to
the highest bidders and those offering
the best terms, not to the county, but to
men not concerned about saving money
to the taxpayers.
U is likely that the new road law
rould lie made epiite satisfactory if it
were modified in a few particulars and
honestly enforced. Hut if the com
missioners are to lie allowed to ignore
its provisions and tie a law unto them
selves, it would be much better and
cheaper to return to the old system.
Under that system the farmers were
themselves largely to blame if the road
work was not properly done, but now
they are at the mercy of a recreant
board of commissioners, who, accord
ing to the prevailing belief, consult
their individual interests before giving
any consideration to the needs of the
public
HAVE THE COMMISSIONERS FOR
GOTTEN?
Last sprint; the county commission
ers passed a strong resolution in favor
of the collection of the full amount of
the taxes levied against bank stock in
19<»3. but they accepted 64 cents on the
dollar, and, so far as anybody knows,
they .ne not urging the county attor
ney to bring action for the collection
of the remaining 40 cents on the dol
lar. Last year the banks paid their
taxes iv. full for the year 1902. aband
oning a lawsuit to prevent collection
after the supreme court of Oregon had
decided that bank stock should be as
1 Make a Special Trip To our ,tore II
3 = and inspect our fine 2
f \&J*y f &&+ Rings. Pins and Studs. It will £
i be a revelation to you. 5
I Tne Martin Jewelry Company t
» JESSE H. MARTIN, Gradu... OrtlcUn S
«£]r.i TeiM rrae GW „ — ■■■■■ —, . *
: sesseu on its market vaiue. i ne uiga
lature of 1903 at the last moment sur
reptitiously passed a bill allowing the
hanks to make their own assessments
on their Stock, and this year the as
sessment was made according to the
new law. This statute is plainly un
constitutional, as it is class legislation
of the most pronounced type. If banks
can fix their own assessments, the rail
roads and all other taxpayers should
be allowed the same privilege. The
railroads do attempt to exercise this
privilege by sending tax agents over
the slate to inform the boards of com
missioners just what they are willing
to pay and threatening litigation if
the assessment is made any higher. If
the railroads succeed in electing the
next * legislature, it is* likely that they
will Imitate the example of the banks
in securing legislation that will allow
them to fix their own assessments ac
cording to the valuation shown in
their books, regardless of the market
value of their stocks and bonds.
However, new legislation would not
be needed If all commissioners were
as obliging as the board in this county,
who threw off over $10,000 in railroad
taxes and fully half as much in bank
taxes.
WILSON HAS HIS OWN WAY.
Ex-Senator John L. Wilson is hay
] ins everything his own way In the
management of the republican cam
paign in this state. Chairman Palmer
is Wilson's man and does his bidding.
B. D. Crocker, an implacable enemy of
j Wilson, has gone to Alaska to remain
dining the campaign, and if Mead is
elected governor, it must be without
Crocker's help. To further strengthen
his hold on the party organization Wil
son has organized a literary bureau
with Ed Thomas, formerly editor of
Boss Farrell's newspaper at Beiiing
ham. as manager and this bureau is
supplying ready-made editorials at
tacking George Turner, the people's
candidate, to the republican papers of
the state. Many of these papers have
bitterly opposed Wilson, but they are
now giving him a boost for another
term in the United States senate by ac
cepting the political pabulum that is
sent out from his headquarters. If
the republicans control the next legis
lature. John 1.. Wilson will be returned
to the senate, as Sam Piles killed him
self at tlie Tacoma convention by
snubbing the supporters of a railway
commission and Foster has little
strength outside of Pierce county.
DESTITUTE OLD SOLDIER.
"Whisky" Dick, an Odd Character,
Must Go to the Poorhouse.
Suffering intense pain from acute
alcoholism, "Whisky" Dick, an old
soldier and an unique character about
town, was discovered in a downtown
saloon this afternoon in a serious con
dition. The police called Dr. Ingram,
w ho attended tiie man and ordered him
taken to a hospital, but as Both the
Walla Walla and St. Mary's were full
to overflowing, he was refused admit
tance there. The matter was called to
; the attention u£ the county commis
i sioners by Officer Mike Davis and ar
; rangements will probably be made for
• his removal to the county poor farm.
; The man was in such a serious condi
i tion when found that it was feared he
I would die before medical assistance
could be summoned. He has been on a
j spree for several days.
AT WORK ON MAIN.
Excavating Commences and Work Will
Be Rushed.
Contra, tors in charge of excavating
streets for paving commenced work
On lower Main street in earnest this
morning and will rush the work as
fast as practicable to the welfare of
business houses along the street. One
section of Main street and a cross
street will be excavated at a time in
order to keep the big gang of teams
and men employed until the work is
completed. Business men have made
considerable complaint about the tear
ing up of the streets, but on the ex
planation of the contractors that it is
absolutely necessary to rush the work
in order to keep their men and team
outfits intact are accepting the situa
tion philosophically and no further op
position is expected to result.
The work of placing the curbings In
the paved district on Alder street
commenced this morning.
Knicker —I remember that night. The
wind was biting— Bocker—l never
1 knew that the wind could bite. Knicker
—Sure. I reckon you never heard of
the teeth of a gale.
~ THE EVENING STATESMAN TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1904.
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL TICKET.
For President —
ALTON B. PARKER.
For Vice President—
HENRY G. DAVIS.
For Presidential Electors—
FRED NEIL.
J. J. CARNEY,
JOHN TRUMBULL,
J S. DARNELL,
S. P. RICHARDSON.
DEMOCRATIC STATE TICKET.
For Governor —
GEORGE TURNER, of Spokane.
For Lieutenant Governor—
STEPHEN JUDSON, of Pierce.
For State Treasurer- —
GEORGE MUDGETT, of Spokane.
For State Auditor —
LEE PURDIN, of Kittitas.
Superintendent of Public Instruction —
W. D. GIRARD, of King.
For Land Commissioner —
VAN R. PIERSON. of King.
For Secretary of State —
P. HOUGH, of Spokane.
Justice of SuDreme Court —
ALFRED BATTLE, of King.
For Attorney General —
C. H. NEIL, of Lincoln.
For Congressmen—
HOWARD HATHAWAY, of Sno
homish.
J. J. ANDERSON, of Pierce.
W. T. BECK, of Whitman.
DEMOCRATIC COUNTY TICKET.
For Joint Senator, 11th District—
J. C. ADAMS, of Adams county.
For State Senator, 12th District—
WM. P. RESER, of Walla Walla.
For Representative, 12th District—
H. H. HUNGATE. of Walla Walla.
For Representatives, 13th District—
CHAS. M. TAYLOR, of Waitsburg.
WILLIAM A. RITZ, of Walla Walla.
For Sheriff —
WM. ELLINGS WORTH, of Walla
Walla.
For County Auditor—
W. J. HONEYCUTT, of Walla Walla.
For County Clerk—
LOUIS SCHOLL, JR., Walla Walla.
For County Attorney—
W. H. DUNPHY, of Walla Walla.
For County Treasurer—
JAMES McINROE, of Walla Walla.
For County Assessor—
MICHAEL TONER, of Walla Walla.
For County School Superintendent—
W. M. DAVIS, of College Place.
For County Coroner—
J. W. COOKERLY. of Walla Walla.
County Commissioner, Ist District—
GEO. STRUTHERS, of Walla Walla.
County Commissioner, 2d District—
J. H. MORROW, of Waitsburg.
Justicp of Peace, Walla Walla City—
PATRICK RUSSELL, of Walla Walla
For Constable, Walla Walla City—
HUGH R. TAYLOR.
MISSES YEATES DANCING ACADEMY.
The Misses Dalcena and Avis Yeates
will issue invitations to tlie opening
reception of their dancing academy on
Friday, September 9, 1904, which will
be conducted in what lias been known
as the star theater. This hall will be
thoroughly renovated and put in a first
class condition for & dancing academy.
The Misses Yeates have come here
with the best of r< ferences and recom
mendations as to their character and
ability. Their mode of conducting
their work will be in teaching all th<
new and fancy dances also will intro
duce the latest society dances that are
taught in the cities of the east. The
Misses Yeates will organize several
distinct classes for instruction in the
art of terpsichore. One night will be
reserved for the c lerks of the town, one
for the young masters and misses be
tween the ages of 14 and 20 years. A
juvenile class consisting of members
from & to 12 years of age. "\Ve make a
specialty of children's dances from the
heel aiirj toe polka to the skirt and but
terfly dances.
For terms regarding club work and
private lessons apply to the Misses
Yeates at their office in the academy
on and after September 1, from hours
9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 7:30 p. m.
to 9:30 p. m. Phone Main 1053.
Ask to see the newest thing in Little
Gent's school shoes at The Golden
Rule.
BRAVE KNIGHTS IN BIG PAGEANT
(Continued from Page One.)
sionally saluting in military style a •
more enthusiastic section of the spec- j
tators. Grand Master Stoddard was re- i
ceived with equal graciousness, his sa- j
lutes to the crowd bringing forth J
redoubled cheering.
The second carriage, containing Sir
George Moulton, deputy grand master
of the grand encampment and Sir
Chas. Matier, great vice chancellor of \
the great priory of Great Britain and '
Wales, attracted little less attention.
The handsome Mounton. magnificent in
the raiment and insignia of his order
and office, was a splendid foil to the
imposing Englishman, and throughout
the line of march their appearance was
the signal for hurrahs and hand
clapping.
Other officers of the grand encamp
ment, Golden Gate commandery Xo.
16 of San Francisco and members of
the grand encampment and visitors
from other grand jurisdictions, all in
carriages, save the commandery, which
was mounted, brought up the rear
of the first division.
The second division was composed of
the Massachusetts and Rhode Island j
knights, the third of New York, Vir- j
ginia, Vermont, New Hampshire and !
Connecticut, the fourth of Ohio, Ken- ;
tucky and Maine, the fifth of Pennsyl
vania, the sixth of Indiana, Texas,
Mississippi. Michigan, Illinois, Tennes
see, Wisconsin, Xew Jersey, Georgia,
Missouri, Alabama and Louisiana, the j
seventh lowa, Minnesota, Kentucky, i
Maryland, Nebraska, Arkansas, West
Virginia, Colorado, North Carolina and
South Dakota, the eighth Oregon,
Washington, Wyoming, Montana. North
: Dakota, Arizona, Florida, Indian Ter
! ritory, District of Columbia, < >klaho
jma and New Mexico, the ninth Cali
! fornia commanderies from Sacramento
Pacific. El Dorado, Stockton and
Placerville. the tenth California lOffi
manderies from Los Angeles, San Jose.
Oakland, La sen and Susanville, the
eleventh California commanderies from
Ventura. Vallejo, Woodland, San Ber
nardino, San Diego. Visdalia, San Luis.
Obispo, Riverside, Fresno, Santa Bar
. bara, Pasadena. Eureka and Lassen,
and tlie twelfth and last division of
California commanderies from Oro
! ville. Nevada City. Marysville, Chlco,
j Red Bluff. Watsonville. Colusa. Yreka,
; Santa Ana, Pomona, Santa Rosa. Peta
: luma. Ukiah, Napa, Vacaville, Bakers
j held and Long Beach.
As the head of tlie procession
I reached the reviewing stand the Grand
Master, officers and members of the
1 grand encampment of the English del
. egation and other high officials left
their carriages and mounted the stand,
where were already seated Gov. Pardee
jof California and Mayor Sehmitz of
San Francisco and distinguished
, guests.
When within lifty paces of the re
viewing stand all commands came to
; carry and the proper salute was made.
Those in the carriages saluted by un-
I covering. After countermarching past
! the stand the commands were dis
missed and the great spectacle of the
conclave was over.
Immediately after luncheon the grand
encampment held its first session, the
rank and file and their ladies dispos
ing of their time in various manners.
Knight Morris Siminoff of this city
was thrown by his horse in the parade
and his skull fractured. He is fatally
hurt. Large cloak manufacturer.
The Malta drill corps of Binghamp
ton, X. V.. was first to receive an ova
tion, followed by ovations to the Deni
olays. of Louisville, the Ivanhoes of
Milwaukee and the St. Bernards of
; Chicago.
The unusual heat had a telling effect
on the marchers and tlie spectators.
Many women fainted. Several persons
met wit.i accidents while viewing the
parade from housetops, skylights and
cornices giving away. A number of
mounted Knights were thrown from
horses, but ail escaped serious injury
except Siminoff.
Joseph Leath, a member of the
A Full
Line of
Infants
Children's
and Misses
Fancy
Shoes
Just in
Sorosis
Shoe

House i
15 Main St.
Mens'
Clothing
and
Furnishings
ef All
Kinds
THE KELLQUGH COMPANY
Exclusive Men's Furnisher
201 Main Street, cor. Fourth Street
Knoxville. Term., commandery. drop
ped from exhaustion a few minutes be
fore the parade was over and died an
hour later.
CHICAGO WHEAT MARKET TODAY
Furnished to the Statesman by the
Coe Commission:
Opening. High. Low. Close.
I Wheat—
i Sept H"3 103% 102% 103%
| Dec 10G% 100% |M%
May .. ..108% 10<j 107% 108fi
Corn—
Jsept ".214 53% 52% 53-%
j Dec 51% 51% 50% 51%
May . . . . 4!«% 4H T < 48% 4t«%
Oats—
' Sept 31 % 31% 31% 31%
[ Dec 33% 33% 32% 33
j May .. .. 35% 35% 35% 35%
Pork—
; Oct $11.12 $11.17 $10.85 $10.92
I Jan 12.60 12.60 12.40 12.52
Minneapolis Delivery.
Wheat-
Dec 108% 110% 10s 100%
May. .. .. 110% 112 110 111**
Liverpool wheat opened % lower:
corn, unchanged; wheat and corn
closed % lower.
Mrs. A. Walsh, the gifted clairvoy
ant, will be in Walla Walla on Friday,
September 2, to remain all winter.
She may be found at Room 17, Eureka
lodging house.
The Golden Rule has the finest line
of boys' and gills' school shoes in the
city.
Fine new cloths for lady's tailor
made suits, cloaks, skirts, etc. Rook,
I The !
1 -DI^LAP-1
: For Style, Coim= ♦
• fort, Neatness |
: a\nd Durability ' ♦
: Wear a Duniap , j
| Hat The Only j
: //a* w/g/? $ Rep- ♦
: utation and Ex j
! elusive In Style t
; ♦
; j
I EVERY GOOD DRESSER WEARS A ♦
j "DUNLAP HAT* j
i The White House ]
j RALPH E. GUICHARD, THE HATTER j
!j PERFUMES and TOILET WATERS !
J As fine a line as ever you saw j
X Quality unsurpassed. Prices #
♦ right. f
\lhe Pioneer Drug Store \
I Z E. L. SMALLEY, Proprietor 6 E. Main Street. Walla Well* ♦
I tsmastmsM *
the tailor. All garments made to or*.
Come in and examine our line ?
budding, Second street.
WANTED TO RENT A FARM
I want to rent 320 acres of ■■«., 1 •
lariu
land, stock, implements and r>»,
sstrj
farm machinery to he fun■ ■
'■ . s at.
isfactory references.
E. H. HILLARt)
Walla Walla, Wash.
Alhelt's feed mill can sav< j
on hay and grain.
IT'S WORTH LOOKING !NJO
But you will always find our
Ice Cream
to be absolutely pure and delicious,
We make a specialty of supplying
frozen deserts for dinners, ice (ream
socials, etc., made in any flavor you'
wish. Give us an order and p t the
best.
Yarnell «S Rogers
TEL. MAIN 703.

xml | txt