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The Evening statesman. (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, February 09, 1905, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085421/1905-02-09/ed-1/seq-7/

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fl! OREGON
em Short linf
„„, union Pacific
0NL V LINE EAST VIA
SS LT LAKE AND DENVER
TW O TRAINS DAILY
Tm , Schedule-tfalla Walla:
r 7rrrve S fro* Spo
* ' kane and departs «~
Pendleton 3.30 p. m
, iv( . s from Pendle
*° * * arl d the East, and
10:50a.m
departs
,i Arrive from Portland
*° 44 . j cpnkane via Wal-
3:45 a. m
lula
.. , paVPS daily, except
N '° Sunday, for Pendleton
and East l»:00a.m
i? i eav<=s for Portland
M and Pnokane via Wal
. ,„ 10:00 p. m
lula v
v i" Arrives from Pendle
ton. except Sunday.. 9:10p.m
strives from Dayton 6 :30 p. m
£ U Leaves for Dayton.. 8:15a,m
p,, man Standard amd Tourist
sieving cars daily to Omaha, Chlca
! Tourist Sleeping cars daily to
v n«as City Pullman tourist sleeping
,V (personally conducted) weekly to
(Maf* reclining chair cars (seats
fr ee) to the East daily.
J T STEAMER LINES.
Pan Francisco-Portland route
Steamer sails from Portland 8 p. m
ever y 5 days.
Daily Boat Service between Port
land and Astoria except Sunday at 8 p
m Saturdays at 10 p. m.
Snake River Boats.
Leave P.iparia daily except Satur
day, 5:40 a. m.
Leave Lewiston daily, except Fri
day. 7:00 a. m.
R. BURNS,. Gen. Agent,
. Walla Walla. Wash.
Wash. & Col. River Ry.
In Connection with the
Through S'eepers. Dining and Char
Cars.
LEAVE WALLA WALLA DAILY
No. 5 Passenger for Pasco,
Seattle, Tacoma. Port
land, Spokane and
East 9:00 p rr
No. 5 Mixed f.>r Dixie,
Waitsburg and Day
ton 1:00 p ir
No. S. Mixed (Sundays only)
for Eureka Flat
points 7:30 p m
ARRIVE AT WALLA WALLA
Nc I Passenger from Pasco,
\ Seattle. Tacoma, Port-
V land. Spokane and
East 11:35 a m
Id I Mixed from Dayton
and way
points 7:30 p. m
No. J Mixed (Sundays only)
from Eureka Flat
points 4:40 p. m
Trains Nos. 1 and 2. between Pascc
v\',q|]a Walla are straight passen
?«■ trains and carry first-class sleeper
firm
NORTHERN PACIFIC
RAILROAD.
3 TRANSCONTINENTAL TRAINS •
DAILY.
ELECTRIC LIGHTS.
STEAM HEAT.
EL Dn, ANT N EW~DINING CARS.
PULLMAN AND TOURIST
SLEEPERS.
Through TicketsTto All Points.
car? t°l a: ' y tor ma P«». «"M
■• folders, etc.. or address.
A D. CHARLTON.
A. G. P. A.
-55 Morrison St.,
S r Portland, Or*.
8 - P A . W. & C R, Ry.
Walla. Wash.
MISSION
j bI <AIN AND STOCK 1
♦ BROKERS *
Charge N olntefestfor ♦
♦ , "* Un * Stocks. *
, M ' n "apoli 5 , Minn. s
Js H * KERSHAW, H»flr. •
♦ "end yon oar daily •
THE EVENING STATESMAN'S WANT AD. PAGE
ONE CENT A WORD FOR FIRST INSERTION; HALF A CENT A WORD FOR SUBSE
OUENT INSERTIONS.
FOR PLACING YOUR BUSINESS CARD OR ADVERTI SING ARTICLES OR PROPERTIES
FOR SALE, FOR RENT, FOR EXCHANGE, LOST OR F OUND.
WANT ADS IN THE EVENING STATESMAN ALWAYS BRING RESULTS.
WANTBD.
MOLER'S BARBER COLLEGE. SALT
Lake City teaches the barber trade
in 8 weeks and guarantees positions.
Write $©r terms.
WANTED —TRUNKS TO HAUL.
Soldiers a specialty. To and from
depots for 25c. Phone Main 602, F.
Graham.
CHIMNEYS CLEANED—LEAVE
orders at Fire Station No. 1, or
Phone Main 57.
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS
at 307 S. Fourth street.
FOR RENT—ONE NICELY FUR
nished bedroom, 210 West Poplar.
Phone Main 266.
FOR RENT—ABOUT THE FIRST OF
February, three nicely furnished
rooms, 350 S. Third.
csoei jjieix*. /\Ti.
SUITS SPONGED AND PRESSED.
16 N. Second St. Phone Main 716.
THE VIAVI CO. HAVE REMOVED
their parlors to the fourth floor of
the Ransom Bldg. We are now fully
equipped to give all kinds of baths.
Phone Main 606.
BOOT AND SHOE REPAIRING
promptly done. Prices right. First
class work guaranteed. H. Romer,
122 East Alder street.
PROF. M'MINN'S SCHOOL OF
dancing and deportment. Office
hours from 1 to 5. Phone Main 508.
WANTED—TO TRADE TWENTY
acres of fine alfalfa and garden land
3% miles from town, for city prop
erty. In quire this office.
FOR SATiB
CARDS FOR SALE HERE.
"For Rent," (all kinds).
"For Sale."
"No Trespassing," (cloth).
"Buttermilk, 5c."
FOR SALE—ALFALFA TRACT. CITY
property taken as part pay. Hough
ton & Reading, Ransom Bldg.
FOR SALE—BO HEAD OF GOOD
Herford stock cattle. Inquire "W,"
this office.
FOR SALE—WALLA WALLA ATH
let-ic club, including bowling alley,
three pool and billiard tables, gym
nasium fixtures, etc. Price $1500.
Enquire A. L. Hastings. Walla Walla.
MAIN STREET BB
tween Third and Sixth, one diamond
and one pearl ring. Finder leave at
this office and receive reward.
BUSINESS.
GROCER.
is at the store of J. F. McLean, 124
East Alder street.
:::WALLA WALLA JUNK SHOP:::
Wholesale and retail dealers in all
kinds of hides, wool, scrap iron, brass,
copper, rubber, lead, zinc, bottles,
old rubbers and second-hand sacks,
and second-hand furniture, stoves
and carpets.
EPSTEIN & YOUDOVITCH.
Phone Main 360 11 East Main St.
WALLA WALLA, WASH.
M. "SHANK"* CO., DEALERS IN
iron, brass copper, bottles, lead,
tine, sacks, rubber, hides, furs. etc.
10'- East Main St., Phone Black 993
~r~ D. MATTINSON,
R< on 1, Guichard Bldg.
Fire and Aecici-rt Insurance.
Loans on City a:.d Farm Property.
Plate Glass Insurance.
IWe becos c your Surety on Bo.Cs,
In d arm ity, Surety Court and
Contract Bonds Wr.tr.en.
BICYCLES.
Oreeshamer & Crowe. Bicycles and
Snorting Goods. Same courteous
. tmcnt will he continued. 55 East
Main street.
THE EVENING STATESMAN THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1905.
NO BETTER M6DIUM
NEW WHEELS — DOUGLAS &
Clem, 9% First street. See them be
fore buying.
FUEL.
Try the Cascade Fuel Co. for wood
or coal. Phone Man 814.
PROFESSIONAL.
DR. J. C. MACK,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. SPE
cial attention given to diseases of
women and electrical treatments.
Office rooms 21 and 22, Postoffice
building. Phone—Offices Main 440
Residence Black 1.
DR. C. R GAMMON PHYSICIAN
and Surgeon. Office Paine Bldg.
Specialty—Diseases of Women and
Children. Phone, Office, Main 316;
residence, Main 582.
DR. J. J. MURRAY, VETERINARY
surgeon and dentist; graduate of
American Veterinary College, New
York City. Office, Mcßride Bros.'
livery stable. Telephone, Main 66,
Walla Walla, Wash.
DR. N. G. BLALOCK, M. D., OFFICE
in Rees-Winans Bldg. Phones: Of
fice, Main 272; residence, Main 342.
W. R. INGE DALTON, M. D., 44-7 AR
cade, Seattle. Skin and genito-uri
nary diseases.
PROF. O. S. MATTHEWS—MENTAL
Scientist. Magnetic, Thermal and
Electric treatments for all chronic
diseases. Rheumatism specially.
Rooms 2, 3, 4, Keefer Bldg., Alder
St. Phone Main 1599.
OCULIST AND AURIST.
| DR. BRIDGHAM. OCULIST AND
Aurist. Eye. Ear, Nose and Throat.
Postofficp huHrlinK. Main 268.
UNDERTAKERS.
IJ. W. COOKERLY—LICENSED EM
balmer and undertaker. Babcock
block, iy 2 First street. Tel. Main
379.
PICARD & HENNESSEY, UNDER
TAKERS AND LICENSED EM
BALMERS, 312 W. Main Street.
Phone 151. Opposite Court House.
I SMITH & MACMARTIN, FUNERAL
j directors and Embalmers, 130 Easr
j Alder. Telephone Main 322. Em
! balming a specialty.
CLAIRVOYANCY.
VILLA WALSH, THE GIFTED
Clairvoyant. Full readings $1.00.
Questions and small readings, 50c.
609 West Alder street. Phone Main
672.
WALLA WALLA MARKETS
REVISED DAILY.
Retail Prtces.
The selling quotations on the local
narket are:
Sugar—Per 100 lbs., $6.70.
Cheese —Per lb. 20c.
Vegetables —Potatoes, per tack; new,
$1.25.
Onions—Per 100 lbs., $2.00.
Parsnips—lc per lb.
Turnips—lc per lb.
Cabbage*—Per 100 lbs., $2.00.
Green Apples—sl.oo, choice.
Figs—Per lb.. 12 %c.
Cranberries —Per gal., 50c.
Pineapples —50c each.
Fruits —Oranges, per doz., 25c to 50c.
Lemons —Per doz., 25c
Eggs—Per doz., 40c.
Butter —Country, per roll, 55c;
I creamery, per roll 70c.
Flour —Per barrel, $4.40 to $5.00;
Graham flour per 50-lb. sack $1.30-
-whole wheat floor per sack, $1.30; toll
ed oats per lb. 5..
Hay—Baled, per ton; wheat, $13;
alfalfa, $13
Bnua—Per ton, $19.50; shorts, per
ton, $10.60; rolled barley, per lon,
$22.50.
F'sr per lb. —Salmon, 15c; hali
but soles 10. ; p- rch, 12% c; cck
sod. He; lobsters, 25c; flounder, 10c;
heiring, 10c; crabs, 25c and 30c; smelt,
12 sturgeon, 15c; black cod, 16c;
j shrimps, 50c.
j Eastern opsters—7sc a quart
j Spring chicken, 18c.
| Geese and ducks, 15c.
j Turkey, 20c.
Meats.
I Porterhouse steak, 12% c.
Sirloin steak, 10c.
Round steak, 9c.
Chuck steak, 7c.
Prime rib roast, 19c.
Beef roast. 7c.
Boiling beef, 4c.
Mutton chops, 9c. I
Mutton leg, 9c. 1 *
Mutton stew, 3c. i
Pork steak, Be. t
Pork roast, Be.
Pork sausage, Be. | 1
Hamburg steak, Be. X
Bologna, 7c. jjj
Head cheese, 7c.
Liver wurst, 7c.
Blood wurst, 7c.
Buying Prices.
These are the quotations on the local
market:
Apples—Per box, 60c to SOc
Lemons —Per case, 84 to $4.59.
Oranges—Per case, 84.69.
Onions —Per cwt., $2.00.
Carrots —Per sack 76c.
Beets —Per sack, 76c.
Potatoes —Per cwt, $1.
Chickens—Hens, per lb., 9c; roost
ers, per lb. sc; spring chickens, per
lb., 9c; grese, per lb., 7c; ducks, per
lb., 7c; turkeys per lb., 12 to 14c; eggs,
35c.
Calves —Live, 4c: dressed, 6c; up to
150 lbs., 4c; 200 lbs., 3c.
Good hogs—Live 6c: dressed «He.
Sheep—Wethers, $2; ewes, $2 6C;
j lambs, $3.
Jp. ~K Kir 1 iiurarii, .John.
A story is told of Mr. Coke, an an
cestor of Lord Leicester, which is like
the John Alden and Priscilla .Mullens
romance read backward. "At about
seventy years of age." says Home
Notes, "Mr. Coke was a bachelor and
very anxious that his heir presump
tive, a nephew, should take unto him
self a wife." So the uncle selected a
handsome and clever young woman,
and the nephew obediently began to
his addresses, however, in a Half heart
ed way. When he at length proposed
the girl rejected him, and when Mr.
Coke begged her to reconsider her de
cision she promptly replied to the old
man, "1 11 never marry your uephew,
but I'll marry you if you like." He did
like, and the child of their marriage
cut the nephew out of an immense for
tune.
A Reserved Hour.
The whole of the day should not be
daytime nor of the night nighttime,
but some portion be rescued from time
to oversee time in. All our hours must
not be current; all our time must not
lapse. There must be one hour at least
which the day did not bring forth, of
ancient parentage and long established
nobility, which will be a serene and
lofty platform overlooking the rest.
We should make our notch every day
on our characters, as Robinson Crusoe
ou his stick. We must be at the helm
at least once a day. We must feel the
tiller rope iv our hands and know that
If we sail we steer.—H. D. Thoreau in
Atlantic.
Matrimony In India.
Matrimony.—A business gentleman,
thirty-two, Buujahi Sikh, having an in
come of about a thousand per mensem
and who is not on good terms with his
wife of late, seeks another partner in
life, age thirteen to sixteen. He in
tends giving the present wife a decent
allowance (besides a separate house),
according to advertiser's position, say,
at least Rs. 100 per month. Further
particulars from No. 602, care of the
Tribune press, Lahore.—Lahore Trib
une.
The Fragrance of Yagsai.
Many smokers are probably unaware
that a part of the fragrance of Havana
cigars is imparted by the wrappings
called "yaguas" in vjjieh they are
rolled. A yagua is the thin, netlike
covering found on the leaves growing
round fie fruit of the yagua palm and
is large enough to wrap a bundle of
fifteen or twenty cigars. So highly are
yaguas esteemed that a Cuban law
prohibits the exportation of them.
A CUconrasrin ; OatloeU.
"So your daughter Is writing a
book""
"res."
"Are you p'?ased?"
"No. We re wc-ried. If It isn't a
success, we'll be a and if
It is the neighbors will probably be
shocked when tkey read It."—Washing
ion Star.
How to Make a Unit Joint.
Mix ten parts iron filings and throe
parts chloride of lime to a paste by
E'f- ns of water. Apply to the Joint
and clamp up. It will be so'id :a tweive
Lonrs. -Blacksm XL r.nd Wheelwright.
WASHINGTON LETTER
[Special Correspondence.]
The bill abolishing the isthmian canal
commission recently Introduced by Rep
resentative Mann of Illinois, a member
of the house interstate and foreign com- j
merce committee and who accompanied
the congressional party to Panama, 1
was prepared after frequent confer- ,
ences with Representative Hepburn, j
chairman of the committee and who |
also went to Panama. The bill is in j
no sense an administration measure, j
although Mr. Mann, it is said, knows j
that the president's ideas are repre
sented so far as the elimination of the
canal commission is concerned.
The bill introduced by Mr. Mann is j
intended to only carry out the joint j
ideas of himself and Mr. Hepburn. It j
provides for the entire abolition of the
commission and extends the discre- j
tionary powers conferred upon the j
president by the Spooner act until the :
close of the Fifty-ninth congress. The
president is given full authority to em- j
ploy such persons as be considers prop
er and give them such titles as are de
sired until congress otherwise directs.
The Inaugural Parade.
The battalions of Philippine scouts
now at St. Louis will be brought to
Washington and assigned to a promi
nent place in the inauguration parade.
The battalion is under command of Ma
jor Johnson and has a present strength
of 280 men. No native Philippine troops
have ever been in the east. At McKin
ley's inauguration in 1901 a battalion
©f native troops from Porto Rico waa
in the parade.
Cologne For Senator*.
A statement of the goods held in
•tore by the sergeant at arms of the
United States senate shows some inter
esting articles one would scarcely ex
pect to find among the necessities for
running the national legislature. The
public may indulge its imagination to
the limit. Here is the list:
Thirty-three bottles of cologne, 17 ice
picks, 69 funeral regalias, 17 bath
brushes, 3 gallons alcohol, 2 cakes
shaving soap, 70 nailbrushes, 12 bot
tles hair tonic, 1 funnel, 1 half gallon
copper measure, 8 lemon squeezers and
186 glasses. There are many other
things equally odd.
Civil Service Extension.
President Roosevelt looks favorably
on the proposed extension of the civil
service regulations to a number of the
employees of the immigration depart
ment who have not heretofore been
under the regulations. The president
is said to have in view the putting of
practically the entire list of employees
into the hands of the civil service com
mission. By reason of special require
ments and fitness inspectors of immi
gration have not been wholly under
the civil service regulation, and this
may be arranged for.
Climb the Monument.
Eleven hundred visitors to the capi
tal climbed the steps of the Washing
ton monument one week recently be
cause the elevator is not in operation.
Confess has been asked to make an
appropriation to put in a new cable,
anil until this is dove the elevator will
not be used. The cable is said to be
somewhat worn, and Colonel Brom
well, who has charge of the public
buildings and grounds, refuses to take
even the slightest risk.
Want Higher Wages.
It is evident that government salaries
are insufficient, judging by the demand
made upon congress for increases. The
state department has asked for in
creases for a long list of foreign em
ployees, including ministers, consuls,
agents and secretaries. Increases are
asked for bureau officers and clerks in
the government service here in all de
partments. Increases are asked for
postal employees of all kinds in every
part of the country.
Inangnral Preparation*.
Speculators are already busy hiring
out windows and other points of van
tage for a view of the inaugural pa
rade at phenomenal rates. Negotia
tions for stands along the line are all
completed, and hotels already have
more demands for inauguration accom
modations than they can supply. Ap
plication for free tickets to the inau
gural ball have nearly overwhelmed
the committee. But the deadhead list
upon this festive occasion is to be con
spicuously absent—no pay. no go, is the
law. The only personages exempt
from a five dollar fine for entering the
ballroom on inauguration night are the
presidential and vice presidential fam
ilies and ambassadors and ministers
from foreign nations-no home folk 9
on the free list, not even newspaper
people.
Sew Indian Commissioner.
Francis E. Leupp, for many years a
Washington correspondent and former
ly of New York, has assumed his duties
as commissioner of Indian affairs, suc
ceeding W. A. Jones of Wisconsin, who
resigned to assume charge of his pri
vate business interests.
The President's Engagement*.
The president will go to New York on
Monday, Feb. 13, to attend the dinner
to be given in commemoration of Lin
coln's birthday by the Republican club
of New York. The birthday falls this
year on Sunday, but it will be observed
on the 13th. The president's address
will deal with the life, characte- and
tirre of th(- martyred president and
promises to be a notable utterance.
Some time ago the president accepted
an invitation to attend on Washington's
birthday, Feb. 22, a celebration to bo
held et the University of Pennsylvania
In Philadelphia. His address on that
occusian will treat of Washington and
his p.eLivvements and their result ujMjn
the nation.
Tie president will be the guest at a
dinner on the night of Mar. h 17, St.
Pntrielt'a day given by the Friendly j
Sons of St. •ctrick. He will deliver $ j
speech at tl i din;:<r in New V irk.
CARL SUHOFIELD
PAGE SEVEN
" The Pine WnodV
The pine stands In the woods like an
Indian, untamed, with a fantistic wild
noss about ii even in the clearings. If
hii Indiaa warrior were well painted,
with pines in the background, he would
seem to blend with the trees and make
a harmonious expression. Th**" pitch
pines are the ghosts of Philip and Maa
-Basoit. The white pine has the smooth
er features of the squaw.
The distant woods are but the tassels
•f in y eye.
Hooks j-.re to be attended to as new
Rouuds merely. Most would be put to a
sore trial if the reader should assume
the attitude of a listener. They are but
a new note in the forest. To our lonely,
sober thought the earth is a will unex
plored. Wildness as of the Jay and
nmskrat reigns over the great part of
nature. The ovenblrd ami plover are
heard in the horizon. Here is a new
book of heroes come to me like the note
of the chewink from over the lea, only
over a deeper and wider feu. The pines
are unrelenting sifters of thought;
nothing petty leaks through them. Let
me put my ear close and hear the
sough of this book, that I may know if
any inspiration yet haunts it. There is
always a later edition of every book
than the printer wots of, no matter
how recently it was published. All na
ture is a new impression every instant.
—11. D. Thoreau in Atlantic.
The Pie Libel.
A piece of pie is iioi necessarily a
death warrant. It depends on what It
is made of and how it is made. Pie
proper should represent au unobjec
tionaole combination of fruit and
bread.
The word "pastry." however, covers
a multitude of dietetic sins. Flour and
fat rolled into a couple of soggy layers,
between which spiced meats, chopped
with more fat, mingled with raisins
and other fruits and moistened with
cognacs—this may be pastry, but it is
a libel on pie.
A crust made reasonably tender with
sweet cream, olive oil or fresh butter
or with half butter and half beef suet
(the soft variety), with sufficient bak
ing powder or cream of tartar and
soda to make it light and porous, filled
with wholesome fruit or berries—this
| is pie. and it is quite as digestible and
| harmless us the ordinary baker's loaf.
; It is about time the pie libel was
relegated to the limbo of other lies.—
Dietetic and Hygienic (Jazette.
Divorce In Turkey.
A woman in the sultan's realm when
divorced from her husband is not
j treated with contumely and often mar
| ries again. A husband simply says to
his wife, "I have divorced you." She
leaves him, and be tells tlie same to
the cadi, who gives to him a paper of
written divorcement. If it is the first
or second time that this has occurred
ihe may take her back again without
i any formality ensuing, but after a
third divorce she will be lost to him
forever. .Men abuse this license and
i sometimes divorce their wives for a
j very small fault, like a bad dinner or
, a button unsewed, each knowing that
if he repents he cap have his wife back
; before evening. It is not uncommon
that a wife Is divorce] from live hus
bands and lives with a sixth.
Cookery an«l (iovrrnmcnt.
Rossini, the Italian composer, is re
j ported to have said a droll thing on
' the unification of Italy when some one
j asked his opinion on this matter. He
; replied that he thought it very difficult
:if not impossible to effect it for the
! simple reason that the Neapolitans eat
; nothing but macaroni, the Florentines
I nothing but fagiuoli and the Lombards
j only polenta, while the Piedruontese
! swallow all they can get. "It it clear,"
'he said, "that uniformity of cookery
must precede unity of government."
Marriage.
Marriage is not the church, the ritual,
' the blessing of clergymen or the rati
fying and approving presence of one's
friends and relations at the ceremony.
Still less is it a matter of settlements
and expensive millinery. It Is the tak
ing of a solemn vow before the throne
of the eternal. Nothing can make mar
riage an absolutely sacred thing except
the great love, combined with the pure
and faithful intention of fulfilling the
vow involved.—Marie Corelli.
A Doable Request.
"Are you the 'answers to correspond
ents' man?" inquired the dyspeptic
looking caller.
"I am," replied the gentleman ad
dressed. "What can I do for you?"
"Firstly, what will dissolve a chunk
of lead in the human stomach? Sec
ondly, wou't you please refrain from
publishing recipes for plum pudding
hereafter?"— Philadelphia Press.
Larky Boy.
Farmer Foddershucks was angry
with his scapegrace of a son. "Young
man," he thundered, "ye're a disgrace
to this here fambly! It's a mighty good
thing fer you thet I hain't rich."
"Why, dad?" asked his son sheep
ishly.
"Becus if I was I'd disinherit ye—
that's why!"--( levelaad Leader.
Reason For Worry.
Baity Moore—Oh, pshaw, old nvn, I
wouldn't worry about Rlowhard's opin
ion of me if I were yon! Calvert, Jr.—
It isn't Lis Opinion I'm w )fryin % about
It's the gror.nds I happen to now he
has for that opinion.—l iltimor Ainc.
lean.
Tbbog'i'i «- r>plf*a.
"Ncrw," said the inquisitive bee? *V»
"I want t> ask you a question. Doj
you think 'n the married state"—
"No," replied neni>e<k promptly.
"I ain't allowed to. - Exchange.
Tlie school o' experience is open 863
days In a year and has no living grader
a te*. -Detroit News.

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