OCR Interpretation


The Evening statesman. (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, February 23, 1905, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085421/1905-02-23/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

I WEATHER FORECAST:
) TonitfM. rain, cooler. Friday
VOLUME XXXI.
LAST HONORS
FOR SERGIUS
His Body Blessed in Moscow
Cathedral This Morning
MEMORIAL- SERVICE IN LONDON
Russian Authorities Fear an Outbreak
on the Day of the Funeral-
Troops on Guard.
MOSCOW, Feb. 23.—The ceremony
of blessing the body of Grand Duke
.Sergius was performed this morning.
The Kiev regiment has furnished a
guard at Chaudoff monastery where
the funeral services will be held. Im
mense crowds thonged the streets to r
day and troops were present every
where. •
After the blessing tlte body was
conveyed to the adjoining church.
Standards were placed in the cata
•VUqne and the coffin was covered with
wreaths and crosses. Officials of the
Sergius household and aides formed
, a circle around the bier, but drew
pack to permit the imperial party to
enter the <- ; rde. Grand Duchess Eliz
abeth took her plac*- at the foot of the
toflta. Metropolitan bishops conduct
ed the service, accompanied by chant
ing by the imperial choir. When the
duchess came to kiss the dead she al
most broke down and was about to
fall, but Grand Duke Constantine gave
her support.
When the grand duchess had kissed
the uniform on the left breast thrice
tne booy was borne on"' the shoulders
>f the grand dukes and aides to the
monastery of St. Andrews and placed
in a vault to await removal to St. Pet
ersburg.
Requiem Mass at St. Petersburg.
ST. PETERSBURG, Feb. 23.—1n the
- c of the emperor and Imperial
family at the requiem mass was cele
brated" for the soul of Grand DuKe Ser
|ptt at Tsarkoe-Selo today. There
Ras a .similar service at Isaacs'
cathedral attended by Cue officials of
i» government The public was not
limitted. ■
Memorial Service in London.
LONDON, Feb. 23.—A memorial ser
vice for (band Duke Sergius was held
today in the Russian churc hconnected
w:th the embassy. In addition to the
embassy representatives of King Ed
ward. Embassador Choate and other
•il'lomatic attended. i
Troops Attack Girls.
ST. PETERSBURG, Feb. 23.—A dis-
Patch from Warsaw states that in a
fight between girls of the high school
police, Cossacks were called out.
viht drove the girls and their mothers
ho n»e with knouts. School boys fought
! Cossacks in defense of
vhe girls. Three hundred were ar
rested.
Smashed Windows.
LONDON, Feb. 23.—Reuters War-
I ! ' correspondent reports that strik
' ■washed the windows of five fac
this morning and forced the me"
* quit w «rk. A company of infantry
red on the strikers. The result is
n °t known.
CORBETT AND NELSON
80T H MEN ARE IN GOOD CONDI
TION AND SURE OF
WINNING.
Nelson | s Having Some Trouble in
Getting Down to Weight—Little
Betting Yet.
SAX FRANCISCO, Feb. 23.—With
. * w eek remaining before they are
*ed mto the ring Corbett and Nel
« ar e working like beavers to get
condition for the fight which takes
**84 ° n " Sth insU Corbett is al *
hayi > R g °° d Shape ' but Nelson is
•%b* S ° me trouble S ettin K down to
kelson BetUng ha s not begun but
n will undoubtedly be the favor-
THE EVENING STATESMAN
COULD NOT IDENTIFY REMAINS.
Mrs. Ensley, of Cambridge, Idaho,
Makes the Attempt.
PENDLETON, Feb. 23.—Last night
G. W. Farmer, coroner from Cam
bridge, Idaho, and a Mrs. Ensley, ar
rived from Umatilla. They came down
from Idaho for the purpose of inves
tigating the unknown dead man found
near Umatilla a week ago. After first
learning the facts surrounding the
finding of the body from the people
at Umatilla. Mr. Farmer wired Coro
ner Henderson that they would arrive
in the evening to inspect the clothing
found with the dead man.
A man named Ensley, husband of
the woman who was here*, last night,
disappeared last October while on
the road from The Dalles to Idaho.
From the circumstances surrounding
the case it was thought that the man
found might prove to be the lost hus
band. The body was exhumed last
night and the clothing shown Mrs.
Ensley, but it is her belief that the
body is not that of her missing hus
band.
BOODLER IN A SAO PIIGHT
SENATOR EMMONS OF CALI
FORNIA HAS APPENDICITIS
AND OTHER TROUBLES.
Has No Money but Bribe Money to
Pay His Hospital and Doctor's
Bills.
SACRAMENTO, Feb. 23.—0n ac
count of the illness of Senator Em
mons the senate this morning post
poned action on the recommendation
of the investigating committee for the
expulsion of the four senators accused
of boodling until next Monday. Em
mons' condition continues critical.
Aside from his serious illness, his
plight is pitiful. While it is generally
conceded that Emmons accepted bribe
money, he cannot use it because it is
marked and he has no other funds to
pay hospital, doctors and hotel bills.
His fellow senators are lining up with
subscriptions. To add to his misfor
tunes, his son shot himseif in the leg
a few days ago while hunting.
The hearing of motions to set aside
the indictments in the cases of Sena
tors French and Wright was continued
till Wednesday.
ADOLPH WEBER CONFIDENT
HE BELIEVES THAT HE WILL BE
GRANTED'A NEW TRIAL
BY THE COURT.
Is Totally Indifferent to the Enormity
of His Crime —Eats and
Sleeps Well.
AUBURN, CaL, Feb. 23— Adolph
Weber, despite his conviction, con
tinues to wear a confident air. He
slept like a child last night and ate a
hearty breakfast this morning. He
takes it as a matter of fact that a new
trial will be granted and that he will
be acquitted. His attorney is prepar
ing papers in support of an appeal.j
Woman Sells Finger for $500.
NEW YORK, Feb. 23.—Sitting back j
to back in the home of Dr. A. L. Nel
den, at No. 13 East Twentieth street, j
one woman permitted the second finger
of her right hand to be grafted to the
stump of the second finger of the left
hand of another woman who had lost j
part of her right digit in an accident
some years ago.
These women are practically i
strangers to each other never having j
met until a few days ago but for the ;
next two or three weeks they will be
bound together almost as closely as
were the famous Siamese twins. Side
by side, they recline in narrow hospi
tal cots, their arms from the elbows
down tightly wound in bandages, and
the' whole encased in a plaster cast.
Dr. Nelden, who performed the
operation, is the same physician who
more than a year ago. declared that he
had grafted an ear from one man to
another.
THE EVENING STATESMAN WALLA WALLA, WASHINGTON. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1905.
INVESTIGATE
OIL LEASES
Resolution Passed Unanimous
ly By the House
TOBACCO TRUST ALSO UNDER FIRE
The Two Houses Agree to Make Sen
ator Hawley a Brigadier Gen
eral on Retirement.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 23.—The house
committee on Indian affairs today fa
vorably reported a resolution calling
on the secretary of the interior to fur
nish the house complete information
concerning the leasing of the oil
land's of the Osage Indiana, including
copies of the lease.
The resolution was adopted by the
house unanimously.
The house today agreed to the sen
ate amendment appointing Senator
Huwley of Connecticut, who retires
March 4, brigadier general on the re
tired list after adopting an amendment
to the senate propostion conferring
the same honor on General Peter Os
terhaus, of St. Louis.
Representative Kehoe of Kentucky
today introduce* a resolution in the
house, directing the secretary of com
merce and labor to investigate the to
bacco trust.
The senate on naval affairs has en
dorsed the president's naval program
by retaining in Ahe naval bill the
house provision for two battleships,
but limited the minimum trial dis
placement In each to 16,000 tons.
The senate sitting as a court of im
peachment in the Swayne case this
afternoon perfected arrangements for
closing the trial. A final vote will be
taken by the senate next Saturday.
The trial continues from 1 to 10
o'clock p. m. with a recess from 6 to 8.
The senate today passed the Panama
canal zone civil bill and a bill pro
viding for the return of confederate
flags to the southern states. The lat
ter bill has already passed the house.
CANNOT MAKE REOUCTION AT PRESENT
The O. R. & N. company has decided
that it cannot at the present time
make a reduction in the rate on grain
from Walla Walla to Duluth. This
matter was discussed at a meeting of
the transportation committee of the
Commercial club and the railroad of
ficials last week when the protest
made by W. W. Raymond was taken
up. This morning General Agent
Burns of the O. R. & N. company was
instructed by General Freight Agent
COUNCILMAN BREWER IS AT REST
All that is earthly of the late John F.
Brewer was laid to rest in the beau
tiful Odd Fellows' cemetery this af
ternoon. Mute testimony of Walla
Walla's sorrow over the death of the
late councilman was evidenced by the
hundreds of friends who gathered at
the Brewer residence in Boyer avenue
to attend the services and follow the
remains to their last resting place.
At the appointed hour, 2 o'clock,
members of the city council, represen
tatives of the police and fire depart
ment and civic bodies arrived at the
residence to participate in the obse
quies. Nearly 200 members o* the
three Odd Fellow lodges of the city
GAMBLERS DREAM OF CONQUEST.
Sports Go Into Trance, Plan a Monte
Carlo Off California Coast.
NEW YORK, Feb. 23.—Armed, they
declare, with full concessions, "Joe"
Ultman and "Maxey" Blumenthal.
both well- known in the sporting
world, have left this city for Los
Angeles to complete their plans for
the establishment of an American
Monte Carlo on Santa Catalina Island.
In this "year-around" resort, they
ESTABLISHED 1861
CZAR DOES NOT
FAVOR PEACE
He Believes that the Internal
Troubles Are About Over
THE NATION WILL NOW SUPPORT WAR
Pride, Patriotism and National Honor
Demand the Prosecution of
the War.
BERLIN, Feb. 23.—The German
court has been advised that the czar
has decided to continue the war on
the ground that the domestic situation
in Russia is now under control. It is
said to be the judgment of the chief
staff of the army that Oyama not only
cannot defeat Kuropatkin, but that he
stands in danger of defeat himself.
The facts of the military situation,
love of country and the arguments of
expediency are all said to favor the
pressing of the war hopefully.
Taffy for Both Sides.
PARIS. Feb. 23.—1t is learned that
the report of the Huil inquiry com
mission in addition to justifying the
action of Admiral Rojestvensky in fir
ing on the trawlers, ajso contains other
paragraphs which are satisfactory to
England and which counter balance
the pro-Russian paragraphs published.
Revived Rumors of Peace.
WASHINGTON. Feb. 23.—Renewed
Russo-Japanese peace rumors were
occasioned today by calls at the state
9 apartment of the Russian and British
ambassadors, followed immediately by
a half-hour conference at the White
House between the president and Sec
retary Hay.
Third Baltic Squadron on the Go.
COPENHAGEN, Feb. 23.—The thirl
Russian Baltic squadron which yes
terday anchored near the Skaw, sailed
westward this morning.
Seven Hundred Killed at Baku.
BERLIN. Feb. 23.—Vorwsarts re
ports that 700 persons were killed as
the result of street fighting in Baku.
Miller to inform Chairman Catron of
the CommercNil club that after con
sidering the matter the company had
decided that it could not grant the
concession asked for at this time.
The railroad people maintain that
notwithstanding that the rate from
the Palouse country is lower than from
Walla Walla, still the Walla Walla
grain growers have at all times been
able to secure a much larger price for
their product than the Palouse farm
ers.
were also in attendance. Washington
lodge, of which Mr. Brewer was a
member, conducting the services at
the grave.
Following a selection by a quartet.
Rev. Albert Dale Gantz pastor of the
First Presbyterian church held short
services..
Following the services the casket
was removed to the funeral car and
the procession headed by a platoon of
police under Chief Brown was formed.
Following came the paid fire depart
ment, apparatus and men in uniform,
next in turn being members of the city
council and civic bodies in carriages.
Scores of carriages containing friends
followed the funeral car.
have told their friends, they intend
to lay %ut parks and build casinos, the
like of which have never been seen
in the western hemisphere. There,
untroubled by laws of any kind, they
say. they will afford every person that
cares to, an opportunity to play
against any game of chance, ancient or
modern, for any sum that may be
named.
Before leaving they said that every
thing was so well arranged that al
most their first task would be to take
over to the ieiffhd, landscape archi
tects and engineers, who would select
for them a large enough site to
answer their purposes.
These chosen architects, builders
and gardeners will be employed to
carry out the plans. Both men are
known as daring betters, not alone on
race tracks, but in various clubs with
which they have been connected.
Ullman was known for several sea
sons as the bookmaker willing to ac
cept the largest wagers offered at a
track. Reports of $25,000 bets made
by John Gates and "Pittsburg Phil"
were freely circulated two years ago
at Saratoga. Last year a published
account said there had been only a
slight decrease in the amounts. That
the two men have obtained a foot
hold on Santa Catalina Island comes
as a surprise to sporting men in this
city.
MOTHER CONFESSES SHAME
ALICE BATES SAYS SHE BORE
BABY BOY LEFT AT WIN
GARD RESIDENCE.
Makes Affidavit in Superior Court and
Gives Consent for its Adoption
by Mr. and Mrs. White.
Miss Alice Bates, a 15-year-old girl
residing across the state line west of
Walla Wulia. is the mother of the lit
tle baby boy left on the door steps of
the residence of Mr. and Mrs. C. L.
Wingard a week ago. The disclosure
came in the superior court this morn
ing when Miss Bates voluntarily made
affidavit to the fact that she was the
mother of the little baby and giving
consent to its adoption by Mr. and
Mrs. Heber White of this city.
Bates will bear her disgrace
alone. She refuses to divulge the
name of the father of her baby, merely
stating in her affidavit that he is a
non-resident of Walla Walla county,
ft is alleged that a Baker City man.
married and with a family is the fath
er, but that he will escape prosecution
at the hands of Miss Bates through
her disinclination to cause trouble in
the family.
Adoption papers were signed by
Judge Brents this morning and the
little baby was legally turned over to
Mr. and. Mrs. White. The little fellow
has been named Robert Arthur White.
Charged With Burglary.
Information charging John Stanford
with burglary was filed in the super
ior court this morning. Stanford was
arrested by the police yesterday for
the alleged theft of a set of harness j
valued at $40 ' from the Washington j
stables in Sixth street. The harness
was the property of A. G. Evett, a
Walla Walla county farmer.
INDIANA'S BRIBERY CASE.
Tobacco Trust Alleged to Have Dis
pensed Money Freely.
INDIANAPOLIS. Ind.. Feb. 23.—De
tectives are probing the alleged legis
lative bribery story told here yester
day and are still looking for C. A. Ba
ker. A letter was found in Baker's
room at the Denison hotel referring to
an enclosed check for $5000 to be used
in the legislature.
James Hamilton, doorkeeper of the
house, testified before the investigat
ing committee that several other mem
bers received envelopes similar to that
in which Baker received his $100. The
Marion county grand jury will take
up the bribery charges.
Awoke in Blindness; Girl Recovers
Sight.
APPLETON, Wis.. Feb. 23.—The
cause of Miss Sadie Clark, of Neenah,
Wis., a high school student, who today
recovered her eyesight as suddenly as
she lost it nearly two weeks ago, is at
tracting much attention.
She had never had any eye trouble
until she woke on the morning of Feb
ruary 6 to find herself stone blind. She
was on a train today going to Milwau
kee to undergo an operation when her
sight suddenly returned and is unim
paired by the mysterious period of
blindness.
Dr. Harper Resting Easily.
CHICAGO. Feb. 23.—At 7:30 this
morning Dr. Harpers physicians
stated that the patient was resting
easily and from all indications will re
cover from the effects of the operation.
But his physicians hold out no hope
of ultimate recovery.
LOCAL WHEAT QUOTATIONS,
Blue Stem. 80 cents
Club. 74 cents f.o.b.
NUMBER 293.
PAULY'S BILL
PUT TO SLEEP
Measure to Regulate Price of
Gas and Electricity
IT IS INDEFINITELY POSTPONED
Big Fight in Senate Over Bill In
tended to Restrict Practice of
Osteopathy.
Special to the Evening Statesman.
OLYMPIA, Feb. 23.—The senate to
day indefinitely postponed Senator
Pauly's bill permitting cities to regu
late the price of gas, electric lights,
water, etc.
Senate bill 90. providing for an
amendment to the present law regu
lating the reporting of deaths and
births and the regulating of contagious
diseases, was up In the -house this
morning and was fought by the osteo
paths. Christian scientists, and their
friends who regard it as a bin to
hamper and prevent them from prac
ticing the science of healing in their
lines. The opponents of the bill at
tempted to amend it but were not
strong enough. A heated discussion
was participated in by various mem
bers. Lyons made a motion to indefi
nitely postpone the bill. This motion
went over till afternoon.
HUGHES GIVEN HEARING.
Wronged Husband Makes Attempt to
Assault Prisoner.
NORTH YAKIMA, Fob. 23.—Dr. J.
E. Hughes, who was brought here
from Seattle on the charge of adultery,
has had a hearing. A new information
was filed '"against him, charging crim
inal assault upon the person of Kosa
Hatch, the 15-year-old daughter of.
Theopolus Hatch. Hail was fixed at
$15,000. Hughes claims to have mar
ried the girl in Ftah. Since she and
her mother were brought back they
have not spoken in complimentary
terms of Hughes. Mrs. Hatch claims
the doctor spent ali her money since
they left here last falk and abused her.
During the progress of the trial Hatch
made two attempts to assault Hughes,
but was prevented by officers.
ROBBERY, MURDER AND ARSON.
Wealthy North Carolina Woman Mur
dered by Coachman.
MONTCLAIR. N. J., Feb. 23.—Mrs.
Hannah B. Ross, an invalid, aged 70,
and reported wealthy, was burned to
death in a fire which this morning de
stroyed four residences. The woman's
coachman is missing. The police are
working on the theory that it is a case
of robbery murder and arson.
Extra Session of Senate.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 23.—The pres
ident today issued a proclamation
calling the senate in extraordinary
session March 4 at noon to dispose of
executive business.
HOCK 6AVE WIFE ARSENIC
ENOUGH TO CAUSE DEATH
FOUND IN THE STOMACH OF
ONE VICTIM.
Charge of Murder Will Be Brought
Against Chicago's Much Mar
ried Man.
CHICAGO. Feb. 23.—Seven and six
tenths grains of arsenic, sufficient to>
kill, was found in the stomach of Mrs.
Marie Walker Hoch, wife of Johann
Hoch, according to the official report
of the chemist who made the analysis.
Coroner Hoffman is authority for the
statement that sufficient evidence has
been obtained to hold Hoch to the
grand jury on a more serious charge
than bigamy. The coroners jury re
sumed the inquest this afternoon.
The jury returned a verdict of death
due to arsenical poisoning administer
ed by Hoch, and held him to the grand
jury.

xml | txt