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The Evening statesman. (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, March 17, 1905, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085421/1905-03-17/ed-1/seq-8/

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| Men's Suit Sale
| Today j
|$ 10 The Price Is $| Q j
I ciwaonnisM J l
Sixty splendid suits piled on a sale table: the sizes well assorted. jk
I The new is crowding out the ol 1, and we offer for this week only this ( >
magnificent lot of Suits —most o' them $15 and $20 outfits, in fine pure { >
woolen, well made, splendidly lived, perfect fitting £ I A AH { *
Suits at 1 U.VU 4
| 1 knoxhats | | llllLrtil w3 and Main t
In Memory of Dick Dowling.
HOUSTON. Texas. March 17.—The
•most impressive St. Patrick's day cere
monies ever carried out in this city
•were those leading up to and including
the unveiling of a monument in Market
Square erected to the memory of
Lieutenant Dick Dowling and his lit
tle band of heroes who made the fam
ous battle of Sabine Pass. The pro
gramme was an elaborate one. It be
gan with special services this morn
ing in St. Patrick's church. Early in
r~ 1
• IMPORTED
JAPANESE
1 CREPE
A beautiful Crepe, like natural.
Suitable for all kinds of sum
mer wear; dresses, kimonas,
dressing sacques, children's
dresses, etc.
You DoiVt Have to Iron It
Comes in plain colors, light
blue, gray, brown and pink,
stripes and checks.
20 Cents Per Yard
MOTTER-WHEELER COMPANY
103-3-7-9 MAIN STREET 6 and 5 SOUTH 3rd STREET
the afternoon there was a parade of
Confederate veterans and other mili
tary and patriotic societies to the site
of the monument, where the literary
exercises of the day were held. The
principal oration was delivered by
Governor Lanham.
TO CURE A COLO IN ONE DAY
Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets
All druggists refund the money if It
falls to cure. E. W. Grove's signa
ture is on each box. 25c.
THE EVENING STATESMAN FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1905.
90
MAKE ROOM FOR RESERVOIR
O. R. 6. N. COMPANY WILL RE
MOVE TRACKS ON THE CON
NELL BRANCH.
Government Will Build Bridge Across
Coulee So Farmers Can Reach
the Stations.
It is reported that the O. R. & N.
has at last consented to the" abandon
ment of its grade through the Wash
tucna coulee to the Connell branch of
its Washington lines in order that the
reclamation department may carry out
its irrigation plans in that district as
serts the Oregonian.
Last fall it was decided by General
Manager Calvin, who was then in
charge of the Northwestern division of
the Harriman system, to rebuild and
operate the branch line between Con
nell and Washtucna in order that the
wheat grown in that district could be
hauled.easily to the main transporta
tion lipes. This resumption of a par
tially abandoned track by the O. R. &
N. was in keeping with a promise made
by the company to the residents of
that district that as soon as the traffic
would justify it the road would be put
in operation once more.
In the meantime, however, the en
gineers of the government had been
making investigations for the reclama
tion of the large reaches of arid lands
in the vicinity of Washtucna, some
100,000 acres in extent. It was decid
ed that to make the plan perfectly
feasible it would be necessary to build
the government reservoir in the Wash
tucna coulee, through which the line
of the O. R. & N. ran. The people
were anxious to have the government
work commenced and Mr. Neweli,
head of the reclamation service, inter
viewed Mr. Calvin on the subject of
the removal of the company's tracks.
The latter official looked with dis
favor on the project, and it has been
thought that the company would re
fuse to mave its line from the bed of
the coulee.
Now, however, railroad surveying
parties are at work along the sides of
the coulee, and it is thought that they
are looking for a good route for the
road. If the concession is made by the
road, it will result in the irrigation of
at least 100,000 acres of valuable land,
but at the same time it will make it
very inconvenient for a large number
of residents of the district in reaching
the railroad. It will be necessary to
either bridge the lake formed by the
reservoir and which will be some 14
miles in length, or those living on the
south side of the coulee will have to
go to one end or the other to reach a
station.
It was one of the demands made by
Mr. Calvin as an inducement for his
concession that the government build
a bridge across the lake in order that
the farmers living on the south side of
the water could be able to reach the
stations on the line along the north
bank.
Fort Walla Walla Notes
The old ice houses now standing to
the northwest of the post hospital, are
to be removed and a bandstand erect
ed on the site. The location is consid
ered an admirable one inasmuch as it
will permit of making the place a sort
of plaza. The plans are to plant trees,
shrubbery, flowers, etc., and to place
benches around.
Captain Ward B. Pershing, Tenth
cavalry, will leave for his station, Fort
Washakie, Wyoming, the first part of
next week. The captain will have
command of Troop E, Tenth cavalry.
Sergeant William R. Reese and Pri
vate Bert S. Sturdevant, Troop D, will
be discharged from the service tomor
row morning by reason of expiration
of term of enlistment. Private Sturde
vant expects to leave for the Isthmus
of Panama, where he has obtained a
position as carpenter, in the civil ser
vice.
Ordnance Sergeant Fitzgerald and
Privates Kenny, Gerber, Engler and
MacPherson left the post today with
a four-mule team, headed for the Uma
tilla reservation. On account of the
abandonment of the target range sit
uated there, it will be necessary to re
move all of the paraphernalia, such as
targets, flags, etc., to the garrison for
storage.
Born, to Saddler and Mrs. Bollman,
Thursday, March 16, a daughter.
Will Consult the United States.
PARIS, March 17.—1t is stated that
M. Delcasse, minister of foreign af
fairs, has recommneded to the council
of ministers the advisability of reach
ing an understanding with the United
States government regarding the set
tlement of the dispute with Venezuela
HAS NOT PAID COUHTY TAX
O. R. A N. COMPANY HAS NOT
TAKEN ADVANTAGE OF THE
USUAL REBATE.
Company May Force County to Bring
Action in Court to Collect
Amount Due.
For the first time in many years the
Oregon Railway & Navigation com
pany has failed to pay its taxes in full
before March 15, in order to receive the
benefit of the three per cent rebate.
In former years it has been the cus
tom of the company to pay up early
in February or March taking a receipt
in full for its taxes on real estate, per
sonal property in Walla Walla. As
the tax has not been paid and no inti
mation received by County Treasurer
Hawley that it would be done, it is
believed that the company may resist
the payment of the amount charged up
to it.
It will be remembered that when the
county board of equalization was in
session last August J. W. Morrow, tax
commissioner of the company, spent
considerable time in an effort to have
the board reduce the valuation of the
property in the county. Assessor Ber
ryman had valued the trackage at
$10,000 per mile and the railroad com
pany asked that the valuation of the
main line be placed at $5808 per mile
and the sidetracks at $1500 per mile.
After several conferences the board
finally placed the valuation of the
main line at $7500 per mile: sidetracks,
$2000; narrow gauge, $1500 and the
rolling stock at $800 per mile. Tax
Commissioner Morrow then made an
other request that the reduction peti
tioned for be allowed, but the board
refused to comply.
Some time ago. when in Walla Wal
la, Tax Commissioner Morrow stated
that he was inclined to settle the taxes
at the valuation placed by the county
board, but as there was considerable
controversy over tax matters in other
counties of the state, he could not con
sistently pay the Walla Walla county
taxes and stil hold out against the
others.
In all probability the railroad com
pany will make a tender to the county
treasurer of the amount of the taxes
that would result under the valuation
asked for by Mr. Morrow. The treas
urer will have to refuse to accept it
and as a result the county will be
compelled to bring suit against the
company to collect the tax.
Fires Leaves a Trail.
EL.LENDALE, N. D., March 17.—Th e
prairie fire which syept over the hills
west of the town last week inflicting
serious losses upon many farmers. The
fire started near Coldwater, sixteen
miles west of the hills, and came
straight for Ellendale, but when about
ten miles from the town the wind
changed and carried the flames south
toward Frederick. A small creek 8
miles north of Frederick stopped its
progress.
The fire burned over a tract of land
thirty miles in extent and about ten
miles wide, devouring everything in
its path, including buildings, hay
stacks, and stock. Not so much stock
is lost as was first thought, because
most of the animals were out on the
range and escaped by running, but the
loss of hay is enormous. Thousands
of tons have been destroyed.
A few farmers lost everything they
owned and are reduced to absolute
poverty. Ail, however, who were in
the path of the fire lost most of their
hay.and inasmuch as the range is
now all burned off they must dispose
of their stock at once for whatever
they can get.
The range is spoiled for three years
at least, which means that no stack
can be raised on the tract of land fol
that length of time. This is a serious
blow, because stock raising is one of
the chief industries of this country.
The Are was the most disastrous that
has visited this section in years.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Sealed proposals will be received up
to Monday, March 20, at 6 o'clock p.
m. by School District No. 1, county of
Walla Walla, for furnishing the stone
for a new school building. Plans and
specifications may be seen at the office
of Henry Osterman, architect. Bids
must be marked "Bid on stone for
school house," and addressed to the
school clerk.
MARGARET CENTER,
Secretary.
Calls for National Bank Reports.
WASHINGTON, March 17.—The
comptroller of the currency has is
sued a call for reports on the condi
tion of national banks at the close of
business Tuesday, March 14.
ALL CLAIMS TO BE PAID
BROTHER OF PRESIDENT HAM
MOND OF COE COMPANY
COME 9TO RELIEF.
Company to Be Reorganized and Any
Shortage Will Eventually Be
Paid Out of Profits.
"There is every probability of the
Coe Commission company resuming
business at an early date and that
every creditor will eventually be paid
his claim in full," said H. B. Kershaw,
Walla Walla manager of the company
this morning. "William H. Hammond,
brother of George Hammond, presi
dent of the Coe Commission company
and a very wealthy man. has taken up
the matter of his brother's failure and
has given assurance that every cred
itor will be paid in full.
"Whatever per cent of the liabili
ties remain unpaid after the receiver
has disbursed the assets of the com
pany Mr. Hammond will see that they
are settled. The company will be re
organized on a stronger basis than
ever before and the profits will go to
settle all unpaid claims against the
old company. As soon as the reorgan
ization of the company is completed
the Walla - Walla office will probably be
reopened for business."
It has been impossible to obtain a
list of Walia Walla creditors and their
claims, but it is said the amount in
volved is not large.
AMUSEMENTS
State College Glee Club.
The Washington State College Glee
club, now on its ninth annual tour,
will appear in the High School Audi
torium this evening. This year's club
is, with few exceptions, the same
which delighted a large Walla Walla
audience last year and they promise
to please even better this year.
The club has been carefully trained
by Prof. W. B. Strong who ranks
among the very highest of conductors.
Prof. Herbert Kimbrough, the talent
ed pianist, accompanies the club, as
does also Mrs. Kuria Strong, the well
known proma donna.
The quartet is the youngest male
quartet in the concert field and their
appearance is always greeted with ap
plause and encore after encore follows
every effort.
The press notices alone should guar
antee a good house tonight. They
have never failed to please and the
staff of the High School Pedestal, who
have secured them, are confident that
they are offering a high class enter
tainment.
"The Fairies Well."
The acme of ali Irish plays, "The
Fairies Well," will replace "The Char
ity Child" at LaVern's popular theater
tonight, and finish out the balance of
the week. This will be the first per
formance of the company in anything
along the purely Irish line, and they
will no doubt acquit themselves as
creditably as they have done hereto
fore. Saturday will be "Pink Tea" day
for the little ones, also the occasion
for giving away the silver set at night.
As The White House Goes
—So Goes the Fashion
Once more we reign supreme; this
time our success has been with our
HAND-MADE CLOTHING
up-to-date in every respect, correct
in every detail, made full an easy
IN SINGLE- AND DOUBLE- BREASTED
SQUARE and ROUND CUTS
at prices to meet everybody's pocket
$10.00 —$12.50 —$15.00 —$20.00
THE WHITE HOUSE
R. E. GUICHARD. tat CLOTHIER
Smart
Shoes
New Spring
Styles Arriving
Daily.
We cordially invite an inspection
LADIES' FANCY SLIPP E R B .
Finest line in the city. All the
very latest Styles.
N. SCIL
[l LIGHT DRIVING J
\rk HARNESS 2
♦ " I'm here with the Goods •
lit — HJ
c H •
Tiderington *
t EAST MAIN STREET ♦
♦ •
♦ The Very Best •
I Optical Service j
♦ If your Eyeglasses or Spec* i
J tacles come from us you can ♦
♦ rely upon It that they are cor- »
♦ rect in every particular. J
| Ludwigs \
1 & Hunziker j
; Jewelers and Opticians *
Shoots at Brother,
BROOKLYN, March 17.—Because
his elder brother had ordered him to
go for a pail of coal, Thomas Smith, 15
years old, fired three shots at him in a
crowded street he/re todajl Women
took defuge in hallways and stores
while men hid behind treetrunks and
in arearways. Policeman Benson ap- v
peared and drawing his weapon, com
manded the boy to throw up his hands.
Thomas did so. When Benson took
away the boy's weapon he tried to
strike Benson whereupon Benson
spanked him. When taken to the
police station. Thomas told Captain
Holan that he regretted that he did
not "finish" his brother.
France May Settle With Castro.
PARIS, March 17.—M. Delcasse. min
ister of foreign affairs, announced to
day to the council ministers that ne
gotiations had been opened with Pres
ident Castro looking to a settlement of
the controversy involving the French
Cable company.
Needles, the Horse Shoer, 208 East
Main Street. Give us a call.

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