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The Evening statesman. [volume] (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, March 20, 1905, Image 2

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PAGE TWO
BAKER-BOYER
NATIONAL BANK
WALLA WALLA, WASHINGTON
Capital Stock f 100,000 Surplus $100,000
OLDEST BANK IN THE STATE
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
miles c. Moore President
t. c. Elliott - - - - Vice-President
H. H. tvrner Cashier
H. *. Johnson - - Assistant-Cashier
Directors—Miles C. Moore, T. C. Elliott,
H. C. Baker, W. W. Baker, E. L. Smith.
S. E. CARR, president
B. F. CULP, Cashier.
Capital $5»,000.
General Banking Business
Interest paid on time deposits
and saving accounts.
Prepare for success at th : bar, hi
4 A 4m\ 9 m\UEm m tmmm, business "■" public lite, by mail, in
MWlt 111 §\7mm\ "'ORIGINAL SCHOOL,
*A\ Am\ Foun <'*<' In 1800. Successful
everywhere. Approved
H '* bar and law colleges. Regular
mmW * ■ i LWmM College Law Cour-e aud Business
m^m m mmaa jm amm A—WM Um M Law Course. Liberal Term*.
VT9 ■ Special Of far Now.
jWM IBajm Catalogue Free.
SpragueCorrespondence
997 School of Law,
" T33 Majestic Bldg., Detrolt.Mlcb.
MEYER
FOI NDKY
Casting and Architectural iron work.
Machine shop in connection.
OLD FANNING MILL SITE
WALLA WALLA
NATIONAL BICYCLES
AT
F. E. GANDERS
Phone 372 55 E. Main St.
New Line of Waists in
Drawn Work
Ask for our prices
S.C.KURDY, M^eet
MODEL BAKERY
LUNCH ROOM
Best place in the City to get a
LIGHT LUNCH
MODEL BAKERY
CHARLES RETZER. Manager
3 First Street Phone Main 38
WRITE FOR
CIRCULAR
FOR RAW FURS
To McMillan fur & wool co.
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
hki'T. ao
BRISTOW MAY GO AFTER TRUST.
Roosevelt Likely to Put Sleuth on the
Trail of Standard Oil.
Washington, March 20. —Capital-
ists who have invested in Kansas oil
wells will be interested in knowing that
the president is seriously considering
the proposition to place the investi
gation of the Kansas oil situation in
the hands of former Fourth Assistant
Postmaster General Joseph L. Bris
tow, who won his spurs in the post
office frauds investigation.
Bristow is a sleuth of high ability,
and the request for his appointment
to this work has come from Kan
sas. He is now at work as a special
commissioner investigating Panama
railroad affairs, but if his services are
needed in the Standard Oil investiga
tion, the president will not hesitate to
direct him to engage in that work.
Bristow is a citizen of Kansas and is
thoroughly acquainted with the situa
tion there. He would, of course, work
under the direction of Commissioner
Garfield, In looking up the oil situa
tion.
Expects Senators to Favor Bill.
LA CROSE, Wis., March 20.—Con
gressman John J. Esch, author of the
railroad-rate bill, has returned from
Wash'ngton and says he is well
pleased with the progress made by
his rate bill at the session just closed.
He believes it will be reported upon
favorably by the senate committee,
possibly with a few changes, and that
at the next session of congress legisla
tion along the lines set forth in the
bill will be passed.
A lien's Best
Cough
g mmmmmm Medicine
mMn S Safe,
Ba/Mllt Prompt
MANY PRESIDENTS TO DE
MEN WHO WILL OCCUPY EXECU
TIVE MANSION FOR NEXT
FIFTY YEARS.
Political Prophets Can Guess, Though
They Are Unable to Peer Into
the Future.
The men who will occupy the pres
idential chair for the next fifty years
are now living. What and who are
they? Where do they live? What are
their names? What are they doing
now? Some political prophets may
think they can peer into the future for
an administration or two, but even
these confident guesses are more than
likely to be wrong, and not one of them
would pretend to predict beyond a
decade.
Mark Twain once made the rather
startling suggestion at a banquet given
to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant that the fu
ture commander of the victorious
armies of the Union was at that very
moment sucking his toes in a cradle
somewhere within the limits of the
United States. Theodore Roosevelt,
president of the United States and
commander-in-chief of all her armies,
was quite possibly engaged in that in
teresting infantile experiment in 1858-
--59, when he was but a few months old
and the Titanic struggle between Abra
ham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas,
for senator from Illinois, was in
progress. At that time the command
ing figures in national politics, as
presidential possibilities, were "Wil
liam H. Seward, Stephen A. Douglas
and John C. Breckerinridge, then vice
president. F * > i.
Presidents Who Followed Lincoln.
But at that time what sage could
have foretold any one of the men who |
have followed Lincoln to the White
House? Even if he had guessed cor
rectly as to the success of Lincoln, he
never would have dreamed that the
rail-splitter would be succeeded by
Andrew Johnson, then a democratic i
senator of the extreme southern brand,
and an ardent supporter of the seces
sion democracy of Breckerinridge and
Lane. Ulysses S. Grant was at the
time a minor partner with his father
and brother in the leather business at
Galena, was locally regadred as more
or less of a ne'er-do-well, and had
come far from making the most of the
opportunities afforded by his apparent
ly neglected West Point education.
Rutherford B. Hayes was city so
licitor of Cincinnati, and there were
many solicitors of many cities who
gave more signs of future importance.
James A. Garfield had left off preach
ing and was serving a term in the Ohio
senate. Chester A. Arthur was taking
a small part in New York City politics.
Grover Cleveland had just been ad
mitted to the Buffalo bar, but he had
no practice of his own and was getting
his living and supporting his aged
mother by his scanty earnings as a law
clerk. Benjamin Harrison was a
young lawyer at Indianapolis, and was
nominated, when Theodore Roosevelt
was 2 years old, for the position of re
porter of the supreme court, in the con
genial duties of which he probably
thought of passing many years. Wil
liam McKinley was a youth work
ing on his father's farm.
When Rebellion Closed.
When the great rebellion was over
and Andrew Johnson succeeded the
martyred Lincoln, destiny pointed
plainly to the whilom tanner of Galena
as the next president. In four short
years he had risen from a humble posi
tion to be the most commanding figure
of his time, was lieutenant-general and
secretary of war. Rutherford B. Hayes
James A. Garfield and Benjamin Harri
son had all won their stars in the civil
war, but brigadiers were many and
presidencies few, and not one of them
was suggested for the exalted office
they subsequently held. Chester A.
Arthur had rendered good service as
inspector general and quartermaster
general of New York, and had begun
to secure a hold on republican manage.
! ment in New York City. Grover
! Cleveland had reached the dizzy height
of assistant district attorney of Erie
county and Wiiilam McKinley had
come out of the war a boy major. But
all of them seemed far beyond the
presidential horizon. Hayes was only
a presidential possibility from the time
Ihe defeated "Rise-Up" William Allen
; for governor of Ohio in 1875; Garfield
not at all until his speech for Sherman
in the convention which nominated
him; Cleveland not until his election
by a phenomenal majority as governor
in 1882, and Harrison only after he had
wrested the Indiana senatorship from
the democrats in 1880. William Mc-
Kinley, however, was in the limelight
of possibility for about twelve years,
| and his nomination very probably
could have been achieved at Minneap
olis four years earlier than it was.
Names of Soldiers.
' It is well to think of the soldiers in
THE EVENING STATESMAN MONDAY, MARCH 20, 1905.
connection with the next presidency.
Of our twenty-five presidents, while
only three (Washington , Monroe and
Jackson) were revolutionary soldiers,
three others (Adams, Jefferson and
Madison) were eminently identified
with independence. Andrew Jackson,
William Henry Harrison, John Tyler.
Zachary Taylor and James Buchanan
served with varying rank in the war of
1812. In our earlier Indian wars three
presidents gained immortal renown.
William Henry Harrison won the bat
tle of Tippecanoe, Andrew Jackson
crushed the Creeks and Zachary Taylor
destroyed the Seminole power at Okee
chobee. Abraham Lincoln rendered
honorable service against Black Hawk.
The war with Mexico was partici
pated in by Taylor, Pierce and Grant,
and Grant, Johnson, Hayes, Garfield,
Arthur, Harrison and McKinley were
all in the civil war. The present pres
ident's service in the Spanish war is
too recent and too renowned to be for
gotten. There have been but eight
of our presidests who did not seek
soldiery service. The last revolution
ary president retired from office 36
years after that war closed. According
to that precedent, a veteran of the
civil war may be president as late as
1920, and a veteran of the Spanish war
as late as 1954. If President Roose
velt were to live to be as old as Pres
ident John Adams, who was writing
about the "formidable approach" of
his ninetieth year shortly before his
son's inauguration in 1825, he will be
with us (although most of us will not
be with him) until the middle of the
present century.
Five Predecessors.
At the time of Lincoln's inaugura
tion in 1861 there were living five of
his predecessors (Van Buren, Tyler,
Filmore, Pierce and Buchanan) all of
his successors to the present time,
and more than likely several of those
yet to come. Now there is but one,
Grover Cleveland. But many of the
successors of Theodore Roosevelt are i
on the planet.at this moment. Some of
our future presidents are infants yet
in their swaddling clothes; some of
them are hardy farmers' sons follow- j
ing the fresh lines made by the plow
shares; some may be hiking In khaki j
in the Philippines; some of them
beardless cadets undergoing hazing at |
West Point; some of them young
members of legislatures; one or two
of them at this time sitting in the
American congress; one of the pos
sibly in the cabinet; one of them per
haps just being sworn in as vice pres
ident, and one of them may be en
gaged In the simple life of reorganizing
parties. But nearly ail persons who
will be in the presidential succession
of the next half a century are at this
moment absolutely unknown outside
of the communities where they were
born or have been reared.
Mistakes In Sizing Up Modern War.
It is so long since there has been a wai
comparable in magnitude to that in tbe
far east that mistakes in estimating
the proportions in modern war are but
natural. T. F. Millard's paper ln Scrib
ner's Magazine on the new T features of
war as he saw it in Manchuria gives
the impression that tbe old terms and
kleas applied to battle descriptions
have become obsolete. It is Inferred
by some of Mr. Millard's readers that
ln previous great wars the battlefield
was of limited extent and all under the
eyes of the commander; that battles
were speedily fought out like duels and
any wide distribution of troops was Im
possible except at the risk of disaster.
Leaving Napoleon's great battles out
of account, our civil war may be cited
as a war of stupendous proportions.
The Seven Days' battles of 1862 began
and ended at points over twenty miles
apart and all on tbe same tactical line.
The Confederates refer to tbis series
as the battle of Richmond, and that
view makes it one field, corresponding
in all perhaps but numbers engaged
with Liaoyang. At Gettysburg Lee's
line of battle was ten miles long, and
fighting took place now at one extrem
ity and then at the other and again in
the center. The combating lines in the
Wilderness were ten miles long, and
not alone the army commanders, but
the corps and division commanders,
could not see the operations of their
troops. The Chickamauga battlefield
was ten miles long, and at Spottsylva
nia Court House Grant's line was eight
miles long. At Spottsylvania the fight
ing was continuous from May 8 to May
21 in the same sense that tbe battle on
Sha river was continuous for ten days.
In the sixties there was no telephone,
but there were field telegraph lines aft
er 1861, and commanders sent battle or
ders and received reports in the heat
of action over tbe wires. And surely
Mr. Millard's statement that it is "prac
tically impossible to stampede a disci
plined army by a dramatic coup on
some part of the field, as formerly fre
quently happened," does not apply tc
the civil war or any great war of the
nineteenth century. There were count
less dramatic coups and stampedes in
the sixties, bnt on no field of that time
was a disciplined army stampeded by
a dramatic coup or even by a succes
sion of coups. Mr. Millard's context
shows that he has in mind the stam
pede of a whole army.
Call at Stanley's Music House for
good Pianos and Organs.
TAKES OVER BAKER PLANT
ISAAC ANDERSON CONCLUDES
PURCHASE OF ANOTHER
ELECTRIC POWER.
Plant Will be Enlarged at Future Date
—Eastern Capitalists the
Purchasers.
A dispatch from Baker City says:
Yesterday afternoon the final details
were settled by which the plant and
holdings of the Baker City Electric
company passed to the syndicate
headed by I. W. Anderson, the Spokane
promoter, who represent Philadelphia
capitalists in the enterprise, as he has
in the acquisition of utility plants in
a number of northwestern cities.
Manager Pollman said last evening
that there were a few minor matters
to be closed up today, but these would
unquestionably be accomplished sat
isfactorily. He also said that there
were no holdings in the Anderson
company by local people. This means
probably all save the interests of Da
vid Eccles and it is current that the
new purchasers are desirous of taking
that up.
Mr. Anderson said last night that it
was too soon after acquisition to dis
cuss the personnel of the office man
agement but that it would be done la
ter. He said that it was the purpose
of the company to get all the property
in such a state as to make operation
efficient and economic for a city much
larger than Baker and its environ
ments are today as they figure on a
future healthy growth.
WOMEN SUES TO OUST HYDE.
Declares His Conduct of Equitable Af
fairs Menaces Her Share of Profits.
ALBANY, N. V., March 20—Papers
have been served in New York by a
deputy of the sheriff of Saratoga coun
ty upon James Hazen Hyde and the
Equitable Life Assurance society in a
suit brought by Mary S. Young, a res
ident of Saratoga, through State Sena
tor Edgar T. Brackett.
Sensational charges are made against
both the Equitable Life and Mr. Hyde
in the complaint.
The purpose of the suit is to restrain
the company from paying Mr. Hyde
$100,000 a year as salary, and to com
pel the restitution of all the money he
has so drawn from the funds of the
society on the ground that such a stu
pendous salary is wonderful and con
stitutes a conversion and waste of
funds of the company.
The complaint alleges that it was
practically through dummy directors
controlled by Mr. Hyde that he was
enabled to have such a great salary
awarded to himself.
It also makes the astonishing charge
that thirty-eight of the board of fifty
two directors are virtually dummies,
who own not a share of the capital
stock of the society, and were put ln
office simply to do the bidding of young
Mr. Hyde.
The suit will go into the legality of
these men to serve as directors of the
society. The papers also assert the
right of policy holders to participate in
the net earnings and surplus of the so
ciety.
Mrs. Young is a policy holder in the
company for the small sum of $1000.
her policy being in the form of one of
the Equitable gold bonds, due Feb. 7.
1921.
The complaint first rehearses the
organization of the Equitable Life and
quotes from its charter the provisions
providing for its manipulation under
certain conditions.
Upon the termination of her contract
with the society the plaintiff avers
that she will be entitled to a share of
the surplus profits of the company anr!
that the amount of the surplus profits
depends upon the honest and proper
administration of the Equitable's af
fairs and the conservation of its fund?
and property.
The identity of all of the thirty-eight
dummy directors mentioned in the
Young suit could not be learned.
Bishop Hare Scores President.
WASHINGTON, March 20.—The
president continues to be criticized for
his action in authorizing the giving
of $102,000 to Roman Catholic Indian
schools in South Dakota. Yesterday
there was a meeting of the Protestant
ministers of Philadelphia, and Bishop
Hare of South Dakota was present and
paid his respects to the president in
vigorous fashion.
He said the charges originally made
by him regarding the payment of this
money were true. The bishop's prin
cipal grievance lies in the fact that
while this sum was given to the Cath
olics, nothing was given to the Indian
schools of his own church in South Da.
kota.
Needles, the Horse Shoer, 208 East
Main Street Give us a call.
SKILES
Call at the new store. Second St
between Main and Alder.
Have You Tried Dr. Shaw's
Cough Syrup?
If you haven't, get a bottle right
away at L. L. Tallman's. sole agent
for Dr. Shaw's famous Syrup of Tar
and Wild Cherry and White Pine
Cough Syrup, the best and most
widely known Cough Syrups on the
market. Now is the time to take it.
Nearly every one has a cough, a re
mainder of the "Grip."—DON'T
NEGLECT IT.
TALLMAN'S PHARMACY
Telephone Your Orders
Phone Main 96. Everything Delivered
Commissions
Accepted
on
California
Races
at the
Idle Hour
Saloon
• TURKISH BATHS j
• The most popular in the city. ♦
T Our hotel is run on the European
«> plan. Clean,comfortable, newly •
• furnished rooms at all times. J
• Rates--50c to $2 Per Day •
: HOTEL~LOUVRE \
#> Tuesdays Ladies' Day at the E: ths. 4
4 Mrs. Davin in charge. •
Steam
Dye Works
16 N. Second St. Phone Main 716
Hostelry THE VALLEY HOUSE
M. E. PHILLIPS, Proprietor.
No. 223 West Main Phone Main 325
Everything new; Steam Heat, Hot
and Cold Water in every room; central
location; rates 50c and up. Walla
Walia, Wash.
EQUITABLE LIFE
(Strongest in the World.)
MILTON HUBER, District Mgr.
P. O. Box 227, Walla Walla.
Telephone Main 167.
km *
§ HAPPY MOTHER J
Wbathrrford, Up
Before my baby was born I was in great I
misery. Iwm just able to be about bat Just M AWk
soon as I began to take Wine of Oardui, w » )c * I I
bad been recommended to me, I felt mucb bet- ■ ■
ter. In fact I feel that rf it had not been for ■ ■
tbis medicine 1 woo Id not have bsin swod» mmm
enough to live tbrongb obildblrth. But tbat WW
waa made comparatively May by taking your ■
medleiDe for four mootba before baby I
Wlna of Cardnl restored asv health as I took U ■
afterward. I oaanot spea* to* Ol
d<>r *" U ISATao.N's Cvn- ttf
Wine of Cardui it a powerful tonic I
ny 41 ' MM which acta on the generative organ! ot JM
g «T women, regulating menstruation and grf- | I
(Whimr * a * mw ing tone and strength Lo th* organs wbicH D I
M*VT if fiammation and weakness have affected. It curas nineteen out |J
I o every twenty cases of bearing-down pains or ovarian trouble. >W
■ I Wins? of Cardui cures barrenness and aids the mother in ■
U c hsr strength for the ordeal of childbirth. After that ■
event the Wine prarenta dangerous flooding and helps momersta ■
■ auick recovery. Wina of Cardui is tha ont madicine a mother jm
■ s iouid nse before and after childbirth. |~|
1 All druggists sell $1.00 bottles Win* of Cardui. I I
J. H. THVIMONS. TRANSmT
All manner of freight. goo , ls
musical instruments handled wttft
All orders promptly attended to S
warding freight a specialty. Offle, v
Kittrick's Shoe Store Phone M,i n^
Meet me next to Ehm's
Bank
ACORN STORE
PHONE 573
Wir Ka.men Amh Deutsck Sprach...
The SHAMROCK
Formerly DELMONICO
208 West Main Street
Everything Remodeled
CHOICE LIQUORS. FINE DOMESTI
AND IMPORTED CIGARS.
FRANK ENGELMAN.Prop
THE HORSESHOE
PETER WERNER, Prop.
Choice Wines, Liquors and Cigar*
Imported Lunches.
108 MAIN STREET.
EUREKA SALOON
LA FORTUNE A, CO, Propi.
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
222 W. Main St. Phone Main 357
The SCHWARZ
JOHN KREMER, Prop.
Walla Walla's Finest Resort
Come and hear the Grand Orchestrlan
120-122 MAIN STREET. V
THE OFFICE
Wines, Liquors and
Cigars
ALBERT NIEBERGALL, Prop.
114 MAIN ST. WALLA WALLA
THE ELK SALOON
JOHN BACHTOLD, Prop.
Choice Wines, Liquors
and Cigars
•?24 MAIN ST. WALLA WALLA
We Are in Our New Building
Better prepared than ever to «rvi
our customers with everything In tb*
meat line. Don't forget the place.
GUS. HARRAS
Alder Street ■ Opposite P.O.
MOULDINGS
OREGON LUMBER YARD
JOHN W. M'CRITE, Mgr.
421 W. Main St. Phone Main »

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