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The Evening statesman. [volume] (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, March 21, 1905, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085421/1905-03-21/ed-1/seq-2/

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♦ MR. WISE MAN KNOWS HIS*
♦ BOOK. J
J It's a bank book and on the •
» Outside is written John Jones, in
♦ account with The Farmers Say- 4
i ings Bank. That's the name of *
♦ this institution. We allow 4 per •
♦ cent interest, which we com- •
4 pound annually, and people who »
? work and save ever so little will £
'■*> gain a lot if they deposit their ♦
4 surplus earnings here. Out *}
♦ booklet tells the rest of the story. 4
: farmers' Savings:
: Bank I
♦ Cor. Main and 2nd. Reei-Winani J
4} Building ♦
BAKER-BOYER
NATIONAL BANK
WALLA WALLA, WASHINGTON
Capital Stock $100,000 Surplus $100,000
OLDEST BANK IN THE STATE
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS:
miles c. Moore President
t. c. elliott .-- - Vice-President
h. H. turner Cashier
h. c. Johnson - • Assistant-Cashier
Directors—Miles C. Moore, T. C. Elliott,
H. C. Baker, W. W. Baker, E. L. Smith.
♦ S. E. CARR, president. ♦
♦ B. F. CULP, Cashier. ♦
4 Capital $51,000. *
* General Banking Business •
• Interest paid on time deposits •
m and saving accounts. #
Prepare for success at th ■ bar, ht
• 11 business or public life, bymaU.
IIVtHV ti."ORIGINAL SCHOOL,
MJSf m A\ fXm Founded In ISBO.
graduates everywhere. Approved
' '"'' r &ntl A colleges. Regular
mrrnW • jk a BmwM College Law Course and Business
Course. Liberal Terms.
Special Offer Now.
jWM |BhU| WmW Catalogue
Sprague Correspondence
m ±*lM m^9 w School of Law,
T33 Majestic Bldg , Detrolt.Mlca.
"W. M BYE JEL
FOUNDRY
Casting and Architectural iron work.
Machine shop in connection.
OLD FANNING MILL SITE
WALLA WALLA
NATIONAL BICYCLES
AT
F. E. GANDERS
Phone 372 55 E. Main St.
New Line of Waists in
Drawn Work
Ask for our prices
S. C. KURDY,
MODEL BAKERY
LUNCH ROOM
Best place in the City to get a
LIGHT LUNCH
MODEL BAKERY
CHARLES RETZER. Manager
3 First Street Phone Main 38
f ♦ ♦♦♦ ♦ •>♦♦♦ •••• «x>«> o-*»«n - ♦ ♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦ -t>4»ni>4>y
£ THIS SHOWS YOU THE GREAT AND NOTED \
S LEAN ZIG-ZAG HARROW j
J. "T^^^g^^T^. .if That we sell so many !
A of with the Oliver J
\ Jl A Aat JL Grang Plows and with i
A jj AA "A tne No - 50 Battons. x
yfl A A A Our Hardware and ♦
N N \J \J >J %J%i \J %J Implement Store is at f
j McFaden & Gorman
WILL VISIT PORTLAND FIAR
MRS. WARREN, SURVIVOR OF
OF WHITMAN MASSACRE, TO
MEET OLD PIONEERS.
Will Be Accompanied to Exposition by
Her Daughter and Grand
daughter.
With the proud distinction of be
ing the oldest living white child of
the famous Marcus Whitman expedi
tion, Mrs. Eliza Warren of Chelan and
well known in Walla Walla where she
has often visited, is planning to visit
the Lewis and Clark exposition this
summer where she expects to meet
many old pioneers of the northwest.
Mrs. Warren will be accompanied by
her daughter, Mrs. W. M. Illsley, and
her granddaughter. Mrs. John Flirk
Blackmore, of Seattle, so that Wash
ington will furnish three living de
scendants in direct line of members of
the Whitman band.
Mrs. Warren is the daughter of Rev.
and Mrs. H. H. Spaulding, and the
mother was one of the two brides of
that expedition. Her father was one
of the best known missionaries in the
northwest, and his name is still held
in loved remembrance by the Nez Perce
Indians, among whom he labored.
Rev. Mr. Spaulding and his bride left
New York city, February 1, 1836, with
the intention of laboring among the
Osage Indians, but they were persuad
ed a short time later to join the Whit
man party, which was destined to
travel across the Rocky Mountains to
what was then almost an undiscovered
country.
A Sister Drowned.
Mrs. Warren was born November 15,
1837. A little daughter was born to
Rev. and Mrs. Whitman the preceding
April, but she was drowned when 2
years of age, so that Mrs. Warren is
the oldest white person now living who
was a member of that party. She was
born at Lapwai, which is in what is
now known as Idaho, but which was
then a part of the great Oregon coun
try, and her mother was one of the
first two white women to cross the
Rocky mountains, Mrs. Whitman be
ing the other.
Mrs. Warren knew Chief Joseph
when he was a boy at Lapwai, and she
knew his father, who was a famous
chief among the Nez Perces. When
she was 10 years old, her father
brought her to the Walla Walla coun
try, where Dr. Whitman and his wife
had settled, so that she could attend
school. That winter Dr. Whitman and
fourteen white immigrants who were
resting there were massacred by the
Cayuse Indians.. The lives of the
women and children were spared, but
they were kept captives three weeks.
Mrs. Warren talks interestingly of
those trying times.
Commander Ogden of the Hudson
Bay company came from Vancouver to
Walla Walla with a body of men and
rescued the captives, taking them to
Portland. It was December and the
women and Mrs. Spaulding contracted
a severe cold during the trip. This cold
developed later into consumption and
she died when her daughter, now Mrs.
Warren, was 13 years of age. Rev.
Mr. Spaulding died at Lapwai in 1874.
Mrs. Warren was married when she
was 16 years old to Andrew J. Warren,
a stockman, in the Willamette valley.
Mrs. Warren has visited her birth
place. Lapwai, but once since she left
it, and that was forty-six years later.
Even with the lapse of nearly half a
century she found one old Indian who
remembered her, and tears of joy
streamed down his wrinkled face when
he clasped her hand, for he had
rocked her as a baby.
Mrs. Warren saw Portland for the
first time in 1845, and at that time she
says there was but one house there,
and that was made of logs. She made
that trip from Lapwai on a pony, ac
Always.Remember the Full .Name
Cures aCold w»r -v, CHpui 2 Days 25c
THE EVENING BTATESMAN TUESDAY, MARCH 21, 1905.
companing a party which crossed the
Cascade mountains over trails. The
party traveled 600 miles to reach Port
land, making forty or fifty miles a day.
Will Visit Exposition.
Mrs. Warren is looking forward
with a good deal of pleasure to a visit
to the exposition, for she expects to
meet many pioneers there and have an
opportunity to talk over the early
days of the northwest, which has been
so transformed in the last few years
that she declares she hardly recognizes
it. She expects to end her days on the
banks of the beautiful Lake Chelan.
Itself one of the wonder spots of this
mighty young state.
One of the most highly treasured of
Mrs. Warren's possessions is a dairy
kept by her mother during the years
from 1836 to 1840. The first entry tells
of the young bride leaving her home
in New York to journey with her hus
band" in a trackless wilderness. The
writing was done with a quill pen in
a fine, delicate hand, and even with the
lapse of years the writing is as clear
clear as copperplate. The diary is of
historical interest because it tells ln
a matter of fact way of the hardships
which the pioneers had to endure when
winning the west. It w T as written by
a woman to whose eyes the whole
country was known, as she jotted down
her observations and impressions. The
old book is in the nature of a photo
graph of the wild country at that time.
WEEVIL EATING ANTS.
Doctor Cook Has Hopes Kelep Will be
Useful In Killing Cotton Pest.
DALLAS, Tex., March 21.—A letter
from Washington says: "Doctor O. P.
Cook, the department of agriculture's
scientist, who discovered the kelep, or
boll-weevil-eating ant, will leave
Washigton Wednesday for a two
months' stay in Kuatemala. The insect
was found there, and it is hoped the
experiment of this visit will help to
exterminate the cotton pest.
"The department already has three
men in Guatemala, who are studying
the process of profilation by which the
native cotton resists the attacks of
the weevil, and two others who are
making experiments with the ants, and
who will bring new colonies of them
to Texas during the coming spring.
Doctor Cook says that the reports
received by him concerning the condi
tio of the keleps already placed in
Texas were favorable. They indicated
he said, that the ats had been able to
withstand the Texas temperature, al
though some of the colonies had been
destroyed by cold water which found
its way into their nests.
He is of the opinion that the ants
can hibernate in Texas under anything
like favorable conditions, and he has
hopes that they will be very helpful
as enemies of the weevil. He will prob
ably not reach Texas until some time
in May.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Sealed proposals will be received up
to Monday, March 20, at 6 o'clock p.
m. by School District No. 1, county of
Walla Walla, for furnishing the stone
for a new school building. Plans and
specifications may be seen at the office
of Henry Osterman, architect. Bids
must be marked "Bid on stone for
school house," and addressed to the
school clerk.
MARGARET CENTER,
Secretary.
MILLIONS STARVE IN RUSSIA.
BERLIN, March 21.—Prof. Reuss
ner, an authority on Russian affairs,
in an interview with the Publishers
Press correspondent today, declared
that 10,000,000 inhabitants of the Rus
sian empire are literally starving.
Eighty per cent of the population are
unable to purchase the necessaries of
life, he said. Mortality from starva
tion is increasing by leaps and bounds.
In some districts it has reached tbe
enormous figure of 10 per cent,
monthly. The peasants are living like
animals, devouring hay, fodder, rats
and mice. The awful popular upheaval
in the empire, he declared, is not due
to any political reasons, but to pure
hunger.
POLITICS ARE WARMING UP
PARTY LINES WILL GO TO SMASH
IN SPOKANE CITY
ELECTION.
Mayor L. Frank Boyd Will Have
Strong Fight for Renomination
by the Republicans.
SPOKANE, March 21.—Although it
is yet six weeks before the municipal
election will be held in this city, the
political pot has begun to boil, and at
the present time the indications are
that party lines will be as badly
broken up as they were two years
ago, when there were no less than four
candidates in the field for mayor.
Neither the democrats nor republicans
have yet held their conventions, but
already there are two candidates in the
field for mayor—C. H. Bungay, socialist
and H. Lr. Lilienthal, independent.
In the republican ranks there are a
number of men who are willing to
serve the people in the capacity of
chief executive of the city. One who
has already avowed his candidacy and
asked for the support of the party is
the present mayor, L. F. Boyd, who, in
a published statement, gives a number
of reasons why he thinks he is entitled
to a second term. Mayor Boyd has,
however, made a great many enemies
during his administration, and as a
large faction of the local republicans
is fighting him, there seems to be but
little chance for him to secure the
nomination.
E. D. Sanders, who was defeated in
the republican convention by Boyd
two years ago. is also a candidate.
Acuff Would Run Well.
Although he does not stand well
with the leaders of the party on ac
count of his defection at the last elec
tion, W. H. Acuff is conceded to be the
strongest man that the republicans
could put up. Two years ago Mr. Acuff
ran on the ticket of the municipal
league, and finished less than 100 votes
behind Boyd, the regular republican
nominee. Acuff is now in the east and
has announced that he is a candi
date.
W. H. Boyd at present president of
the council, has been prominently men
tioned for mayor on the republican
ticket, and may become a candidate.
On the democratic side, City Comp
troller Floyd Daggett seems to have
the lead at the present time, although
several ther candidates have been
mentioned. Daggett stands well with
the machine and has an excellent
chance for the nonrnation, but he has
many opponents in the party, some
of whom declare that if he is nomin
ated an independent democratic ticket
will be put into the field.
What promises to be the most
important issue of the campaign, is
the question of the granting of fran
chises. For several years past it has
been almost impossible for any cor
poration, with the exception of the
Washington Water Power company,
the Spokane Gas Light company and
the Pacific States Telephone company
to secure a franchise.
Finally the Spokane Traction, at the
head of which is Jap P. Graves, the
millionaire mining man, broke through
and obtained franchises for street car
lines on several streets. Since that
time this company has been fought
at every turn by the Washington
Power company, and has had several
franchises turned down. At the pres
ent time an independent telephone
company and an indepedent gas com
pany are trying to get franchises, but
thus far have been unable to do so.
Last week a petition was circulated
asking that a charter amendment be.
submitted at the next election provid
ing that the people have a right to vote
On all franchises. Although this pe
tition was in circulation but two days,
it is claimed that it received enough
signatures to compel the council to
submit it. At the last meeting of the
council this petition was referred to
a committee. Its promoters claim
that this was done to delay it till too
late to give it the necessary publica
tion and declare that if it is not taken
up and submitted at the next meeting
of the council a writ of mandate will
be asked for. —
A feature of the campaign is the ac
tion of the young republicans employed
at the court house, who have declared
that Charles B. Hopkins must keep
his hands off the municipal campaign.
They have held several meetings and
are working hard to create a senti
ment against Hopkins. It is confident
ly asserted by the opponents of Hop
kins that he will not be able to control
the coming convention, and that should
he try to throw his support to Mayor
Boyd, as he is expected to do, it
would mean the setting of his political
star.
Pruning trees, digging wells; also
repairing cisterns. J. A. S., 359, corner
Chestnut and Spra#rue.
I Skiles Dry Goods Co.
> SECOND STREET. BETWEEN MAIN on? ALDER
; Two Days' Sale of Portiers and
Lace Curtains Wednesday
and Thursday
• Take Advantage of Our Two Days' Sale
> i
» $6.00 Portiers, two days at « i « 1
» $5.00 Portiers, two days at I 1
» $6.00 Lace Curtains, two days at - «J f 1
I $4.00 Lace Curtains, two days at ' I
( $3.50 Lace Curtains, two days at
• $3.00 Lace Curtains, two days at - Si a- !
$2.00 Lace Curtains, two days at JJ'5 <
J «?I.bo J
> EVERY CURTAIN MARKED DOWN. !
Have You Tried Dr. Shaw's
Cough Syrup?
If you haven't, get a bottle right
away at L. L. Tallman's, sole agent
for Dr. Shaw's famous Syrup of Tar
and Wild Cherry and White Pine
Cough Syrup, the best and most
widely known Cough Syrups on the
market. Now is the time to take it.
Nearly every one has a cough, a re
mainder of the "Grip."—DON'T
NEGLECT IT.
TALLMAN'S PHARMACY
Telephone Your Orders
Phone Main 96. Everything Delivered
Commissions
Accepted
on
California
Races
at the
Idle Hots*
Saloon
| TURKISH BATHS j
• The most popular in the city. 4
T Our hotel is run on the European
«> plan. Clean,comfortable, newly c
• furnished rooms at all times. *
• Rates--50c to 52 Per Day I
: HOTELIOUVRE |
• Tuesdays Ladies' Day at the Beth?. ♦
«> Mrs. Davin in charge. c
Steam
Dye Works
16 N. Second St. Phone Main 716
Hostelry THE VALLEY HOUSE
M. E. PHILLIPS, Proprietor.
No. 223 West Main Phone Main 325
Everything new; Steam Heat. Hot
and Cold Water in every room; central
location; rates 50c and up. Walla
Walla, Wash.
EQUITABLE LIFE
(Strongest in the World.)
MILTON HUBER, District Mgr.
P. O. Box 227, Walla Walla.
Telephone Main 167.
Have you seen the Bod
ley Club Library at
The Book Nook?
J. H. TIMMONS, TRANSfER
All manner of freight, goods gjij
musical instruments handled with care;
All orders promptly attended to. F or .
warding freight a specialty. Offlce, Me.
Kittrick's Shoe Store Phone Main 2fc
Meet me next to Ehm's
Bank
ACORN STORE
PHONE 573
Wir Kaniien Auch Deutsch Sprachea.
The SHAMROCK
Formerly DELMONICO
208 West Main Street
Everything Remodeled
CHOICE LIQUORS. FINE DOMCSTI
AND IMPORTED CIGARS.
FRANK ENGELMAN.Prop
THE HORSESHOE
PETER WERNER, Prop.
Choice Wines, Liquors and Cigar*
Imported Lunches.
108 MAIN STREET.
EUREKA SALOON
LA FORTUNE & CO., Props.
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGAR&
222 W. Main St. Phone Main 357
The SCHWAB
JOHN KREMER, Prop.
Walla Walla's Finest Resort
Come and hear the Grand Orchestrlu
120-122 MAIN STREET.
THE OFFICE
Wines, Liquors and
Cigars
ALBERT NIEBERGALL, Prop.
114 MAIN ST. WALLA WALL*
THE ELK SALOON
JOHN BACHTOLD, Prop.
Choice Wines, Liquors
and Cigars
724 MAIN ST. WALLA WALL*
We Are in Our New WW
Better prepared than ever w j
our customers with everything
meat line. Don't forget the pW*
GUS. HARRAS
Alder Street • Jlptrf^
MOULDINGS
OREGON LUMBER YA "
JOHN W. M'CRITE, Ms* I
♦21 W. Main St. Thone

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