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The Evening statesman. (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, April 29, 1905, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085421/1905-04-29/ed-1/seq-3/

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A BOYS BEST FRIEND
jt ways appreciate her goodness,
<1 cs I )ec, 'ally when he grows into a
>oung man and mamma launders
V)is linen according to old-fash-
M ta^ 'lO ioneJ m e thods. "When a man
|y~V«# SeeS the exquisite color and do
-1 mestic finish on collars and cuffs
P ut 011 by tne WALLA WALLA
STEAM LAUNDRY he is our
patron forev er after. No cellu-
'
Have Kvur Friends Come West
Lowest Rates O/er
The Northwestern Line
Fran CVicag>ani the Cast. Tot full Wm wOmm writs to
W. A. COX
GENERAL ALENT
153 THIRD STREET PORTLAND. ORE.
IA Jack for All Trades
\ If Strong, malleable cast.
♦ 11, Works up or down.
♦ J|iF%k Easily adjusted to any position.
L NltiW Manufactured by
JJL GILBERT-HUNT

♦ Walla Walla. Waih.
We Pay Depositors
PER CENT 2 PER CENT
ON CHECKING ACCOUNTS
There is no easier or safer way to add to your income
than by having your checking account earning for you.
We welcome the accounts, large or small, of firms, cor
porations and individuals, and extend to our depositors
every accommodation within the limits of safe banking.
ftmTlr CAPITAL
$100,000
Phoenix Pure Paint
- AT =========
J. H. STOCKWELL
Telephone 523 121 Main Street
I IW&SL.
♦ Kent Co.
♦ ( Incorporated )
f Manufacturers of all kinds of
I Lumber, Lata and Shingles
I LonffLeiffths aad Brtdgre Timber
I a Specialty
I Can send you an entire house or barn bill direct from Mill to
♦ your nearest railroad station.
t Come and see us at our Walla Walla yards, Fourth and Elm. Ex
-4 amine carefully our lumber. Get our nrices. We are satisfied we can
♦ please you. We carry everything for your entire home
♦ Phone Main 774 W. H. DRAKE, Local Mgr. ALWAYS ADDRESS
I KENT LUMBER 00.
♦ Photographic Supplies ♦
I vacation. SEE OUR WINDOW. +
t E. L. SMALLEY t
♦ THE PIONEER DRUG STORE +
t 6 EAST JWAIN ST. PHONE 137 i
♦ Thote who hive tried it know that
>♦ WHITE CLOUD RYE is the best
I You can get it at nearly all fir,t-da» bar,
I BACHTOLD & ACKERMAN. D»tnbutors
THE EVENING STATESMAN SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1905.
WRIGHT MAY BE INNOCENT
EVIDENCE IS COLLECTED SHOW
ING THAT HE DID NOT AID
MERRILL AND TRACY
Was Employed on a Ranch on the
Sound Ten Days Before Salem
Break Occurred
Harry C. Wright, arrested by Sher
iff Culver of Salem, Ore., as he stepped
from the state penitentiary a few
weeks ago. and taken to Salem to an
swer the charge of murder for aiding
outlaws Tracy and Merrill to escape
from the Oregon penitentiary, may be
entirely innocent of the charge, ac
cording to a story which comes from
the sound.
At the request of the sheriff's office
at Salem, Sheriff Smith of King
county, has detailed one of his men to
gather certain evidence that the Ore
gon authorities desire. The evidence
collected so far points conclusively to
the innocence of Wright in connec
tion with the jail break.
The indictment was returned against
Wright for smuggling a gun into
Tracy and Merrill on June 8, 1902, the
day before the men made their break
for freedom.
Deputy Sheriff Hill who has had
charge of the work of gathering evi
dence in Seattle, has secured affida
vits which have been forwarded to Sa
lem showing that for ten days before
and following the jail break Wright
was working at South Park. A ran
cher by the name of Van Horn em
ployed him during part of the time,
and time books kept by his employers
during that time show that he could
not have been near the penitentiary at
Salem shortly before the break and at
the time the gun was smuggled to
Tracy. The books of the Seattle free
employment office show that he was in
Seattle about the time the gun was
supposed to have been smuggled in to
the penitentiary.
The King county sheriff has secured
affidavits supporting the result of its
investigations and forwarded them to
the authorities at Saiem, Ore. As this
evidence would probably free the man
upon a trial, the Seattle officials doubt
if the man will ever be called upon to
face a jury.
DANCING GIRL HEIR TO MILLIONS
Mountain Girl and a Pittsburg Soci
ety Man Wedded.
PITTSBURG, April 29.—Closely fol
lowing upon the Carnegie-Hever mar
riage sensation same the announce
ment which seemed to paralyze the so
cial end of Pittsburg.
The bridegroom is Samuel S. Rey
mer, one of two heirs to Jacob S. Rey
mer, of Reymer Brothers, candy man
ufacturers, worth millions, and the
bride, Nellie H. Paris, a mountaineer
carnival dancer and former kitchen
girl of the Fayette county coke regions
and daughter of a poor carpenter, Wil
liam Paris.
The couple were married In March
and left at once for the west. They
are now thought to be in Denver.
The meeting, courtship and finally
the marriage of Mr. Reymer and Miss
Paris were romantic in the extreme.
Four years ago, when 19 years of age,
Nellie left the smoky mountain town
of Oliver and came to Pittsburg. Her
parents, in their home at Oliver, say
that she was employed for a time as
kitchen girl in Pittsburg. Afterwards
the glamor of the stage attracted her.
It was during the season of carnivals
when the Elks had a big street show
in Allegheny three years ago. The
young woman, who is pretty and
graceful, attracted Mr. Reymer's at
traction. She was dancing on the
stage when the young business man
first saw her.
The parents of young Reymer refus
ed to discuss the wedding. While the
aristocratic family of Reymer may
refuse to receive the dancing daughter
of the coke region carpenter, there
seems little doubt but that the Paris
family are pleased with the new son
in-law. They live in a little coke vil
lage some miles from Connellsville, in
one of the cheap company houses.
SCHOOL MA'AMS UNDER BAN
South Dakota Maidens in a League to
Part Teachers and Cupid.
HURON, S. D., April 29.—The pretty
girls of home production in this sec
tion have organized to boycott, ostra
cise and otherwise try to work injury
to the young women who are being
imported from Illinois, lowa, and Min
nesota because of the dearth of school
teachers.
In the last three years tempting of
fers of increased salaries have been
hung out to attract teachers from oth
er states, and they have come by the
scores. But, alas! say the native girls,
they teach school for only a short
time —leaving the school room to do
the housework and spend the accumu
lated savings of the most desirable
young farmers and stockmen, while the
maidens of home production drift to
old maidhood.
The "home girls" are up in arms.
They are working as a single body
against their imported sisters, and the
edict has gone forth that in future no
imported teacher shall be given open
access to society until she has proven
that she means to remain a teacher.
The marriageable young men are
joining forces with the imported girls,
and an interesting struggle is expected.
Government Printing Scandal.
WASHINGTON, April 29.—The com
mittees on printing of the two houses
of congress have begun an investiga
tion of the government printing office,
which, it is believed, will result in rev
elations of extravagance, if nothing
worse, approximating in public inter
est the postoffice department scandal.
The various executive departments are
making an abstract of all the work
they have ordered from the printing
office during the last 14 years. In that
period of time the expenditure on ac
count of printing has risen from about
$2,500,000 to more than $6,500,00 a
year. The peculiar fact is that, while
the printing bill has increased by more
than 250 per cent, the orders of the de
partments, as shown by rough esti
mates have not increased nearly so
much. The orders may have called for
100 per cent more work, but the cost
has gone up more than double that
quantity.
SUSPECTS ARE FREED
Rewards for Murderers of Miss Kintop
Likely to Be Increased
LITTLE. FALLS, Minn., April 29.—
The two negro suspects held at Clo
quet for the murder of Annie Kintop,
have been released, officials from here
finding that they were not the mur
derers. Waseca sends a report that it
is holding a strange negro on suspi
cion, but it is not believed here that the
arrest is important.
Citizens of Little Falls will ask the
governor to increase the state's reward
to $1,000 and the county commission
ers may offer another $1,000.
The tall negro suspected of the mur
der had a long scar on the side of his
face, it has been learned, and should
be easily identified. It is said he once
lived in Minneapolis, and had a bad
reputation there.
Sealed proposals will be received up
to Friday, May 26th, at 5 o'clock p. m.
by School District No. 1, County of
Walla Walla, Wash., for desks and
school furnishings for the new Green
Park school building, according to
plans and specifications which may
be seen at the office of the School
Board, Paine block. Bids must be
marked, "Bids for school furnishings"
and addressed to the undersigned.
The School Board reserves the right
to reject any and all bids.
MARGARET CENTER,
Secretary.
Dr. W. J. Waite, eyesight Specialist,
will examine your eyes free of charge
and grind glasses to fit all difficult
cases. Optical parlors, Z. K. Straight
Jewelry store.
♦■ The Evening Statesman is de
-♦• livered into /more Walla Walla ♦
-♦■ homes than any other paper.
■♦■ That is why it gives the best re- ♦
■•■ suits to advertisers. It pays best. ♦
Turkestan. Alfalfa seed. Milt Evans.
Drop in and see our new patterns of Buggies and Carriages of
G)lumbus and Racine make.
McFADEN & GORMAN
20, 22 and 24 ALDER STREET
PORTLAND'S HOUSE IN ORDER
WORK OF CONSTRUCTION FOR
LEWIS AND CLARK FAIR IS
PRACTICALLY COMPLETE
Accommodations for Large Parties
From East and Pacific Coast Have
Been Reserved
PORTLAND, April 29.—The open
ing- of the Lewis and Clark exposition
is only one month off, and all the
builders and exhibitors are on the rush.
The work of construction is practical
ly completed and all that remains to
be done is to put the finishing touches
to the buildings and grounds. Walks
and roadways are being laid, gardens
of flowers planted, statuary placed in
position and other work of a similar
character being pushed to completion.
Barring a visitation of Providence the
exposition will open on time and in a
finished state. The interior of the
buildings are being beautified by rich
decorations. Many exhibits are al
ready in place, and hundreds of others
are on the tracks awaiting transfer to
their proper places in the exhibition
palaces.
Inquiries received by every mail in
dicate a widespread interest in the ex
position. Accommodations for large
parities have been reserved at every
hotel, and Portland is looking forward
to entertaining soon the largest crowd
that ever assembled in any city in the
northwest. The favorable transconti
nental rates granted by the railroads
is expected to result in the visit of
large parties of tourists from the east.
LEWIS AND CLARK EXPOSITION.
June Ist to October 15th.
Tickets to Portland will be sold from
Walla Walla daily at rate of $9.75 for
the round trip, good for thirty days.
For ten or more traveling on one
ticket a rate of $7.30 for round trip
will be made. Tickets limited to ten
days.
In addition to the above daily excur
sion rates the O. R. & N. Co. will, from
time to time during the fair, run a
series of coach excursions at very low
rates. Dates for these excursions will
be announced later.
R. BURNS,
General Agent, O. R. & N. Co.,
Walla Walla, Wash.
Sealed proposals will be received
up to Friday, May 26, at 5 o'clock p.
m., by the Board of Directors of
School District No. 1, Walla Walla
County, Wash., for Venetian blinds for
the Green Park School Building, ac
cording to plans on file with Architect
Henry Osterman, Baker-Boyer Bank
building, Rooms 7 and 8. Bids must
be marked "Bids for Venetian blinds"
and addressed to the undersigned.
The Board of School Directors re
serves the right to reject any and ail
bids. MARGARET CENTER,
• ■ Secretary.
All Talking Machines now sold on
tne installment plan—Stanley Music
House.
Salmon Trout at Peoples' Cash Mar
ket. Telephone Main 92.
For fine Meats ring up Main 92. Gus
Augustavo.
tAQIfHAtI
THE ENCORE.
• Orlirlnatrd In France In the Severn*
tecnth Ontorr.
The beginning of the encore data**
jack to some time between 1648 and)
1709, probably about 1680, when Loot*
XIV. demanded the repetition of cer
tain parts of an opera. Tbe opera was
by Corneille, Fontenelle and Botleau.
which was sung before his majesty.,
and the king was so pleased with cer
tain parts that he asked to have them
repeated. It took fully a century for
the ordinary opera goers to obtain the.
king's prerogative for themselves. It
came about in this way: Oluck had
produced an opera which had been a
failure; but. having rewritten the
worst parts, he produced it again. One*
or two songs were accepted by the au
dience with applause, and one in pars
tlcular was demanded a second time. '
The most remarkable encores on rec
ord are those which were Insisted upon
by tbe late king of Bavaria. Before he
was known to be insane, when merely;
thought eccentric, he had plays
formed before him as the sole auditor,
the curtain rising at midnight If he
liked the play he insisted on having it
repeated at once. But, unlike most en
core fiends, he paid liberally for them.
Though our word "encore" Is adopt
ed from the French, they themselves
do not make use of It in this connec
tion. They call "Bis, bis," and obtain
a repetition.—New York Herald.
|
THE RUSSIAN ICON. j
It la Simply a Relln-lona Plctoro
Bleaaed by a Prleat.
An icon la simply a religious picture,
generally of little artistic merit, and
the subject usually represented Is ei
ther a Russian saint, some event In the
life of Jesus Christ or the Virgin Mary.
In the Greek church, as in other Chris
tian churches, the worship of graven
images is forbidden, but no objection
Is made to anything reproduced on a
flat surface. Therefore Icons are per
mitted in the form of mosaics, paint
ings, enamels or prints. They play an
important part In the religious life of
the Russians and are to be met with
every where—in churches, public offices,
private houses and shops. A picture
to become an Icon must be blessed by
a priest, and It Is then regarded not on
ly as an ornament, but as an accessory
in the worship of the Greek church.
Icons are also worn on tbe person,
when they take the form of a plaque
or a book with two leaves. Almost ev
ery soldier wears one on his bosom,
and when he prays be takes out his
icon and, opening It, kneels down be
fore It as If It were a portable altar.
Every regiment has Its own Icon,
which It carries as It would carry Its
banner when the regiment goes Into
battle. |
THE PRICE OF A LIFE.
How It Was Fixed Under the Old'
Anglo-Saxon Laws.
According to Anglo-Saxon laws, ev
ery man's life, Including that of the
king, was valued at a fixed price, and
any one who took it could commute the
offense by a money payment upon a
fixed scale. Tbe life of a peasant waa
reckoned to be worth 200 shillings, that
of a man of noble birth 1,200 shillings,
and tbe killing of a klug Involved the
regicide In a payment of 7,200 shil
lings, -y
It has been pointed out that the heir
to tbe throne could thus get rid of the
existing occupant by murdering him,
and thereafter handing over the fine*
according to the scale, to the excheq
uer, when bis offense would be purged)
and his money would come back tot
himself, for In those days tbe sover-t
eign received all fines as personal per-<
qulsltes. There Is very little doubt
that these rough means were practical*
ly applied in the case of some rulers oji
England In the preconquest period.—(
London Telegraph.
Hacks —Shaughnessy & Clancy.
Stand, Caswell's Cigar Store. Phone
350.

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