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The Evening statesman. (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, August 05, 1905, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085421/1905-08-05/ed-1/seq-3/

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the Golden Rule Department Store
A BOY'S BEST FRIEND
13 hIS motner ' but ne doesn't al
ii /Cly WayS appreclate her goodness,
<1 cs P eciall y "hen he grows Into a
Young man and mamma launders
/ \ * linen according to old-fash
-1 j' J ,oned methods, When a man
Bees the exquisite color and do "
) ?(f%]t *nestic finish on collars and cuffs
.' ut °" by the WALLA WALLA
BTEAM LAUNDRY he Is our
» 'limml I t iatror » forever after. No cellu
\W y lOi<l finlSh Wlth hlm "
COPYRIGHT "
Extremely Refreshing and ap- I
j V TP 4- petizing are those ?
10 I Olir 1 aSte delicate && 0 0 ♦
GRAPE PUNCHES SERVED AT ♦
THE BOOK NOOK I
Cor. Ist and 453 \
TO-NIGHT
TONIGHT
TO-NIGHT
TO-NIGHT
f— ii fa—!
AT THE PARK
"THE CHRISTIAN"!
THE PLAY IN THE
HANDS OF ART
ISTS HAS HADE
A BIG HIT
m
DON'T MISS
J SEEING
IT
PRICES
20c 30c 40c
hotel moore
SEASIDE, CLATSOP BEACH, OREGON.
AMERICAN PLAN
Sea ls^ 11 ' OVerl °oking the ocean. Newly rebuilt and refurnished,
frort f a Specialt y- Hot Salt Baths. Fine surf bathing directly in
Ro 0m ° H ° teL Lar ee sto "c fireplaces and furnace heat. The
ar ound 311 har <3 finished, dry and comfortable. Open the year
• Rate s. J2.50 to 54.00 per day.
DAN J. MOORE, PROP.
- - - A CLEAN, NEW STOCK - - -
k- .N° where can you find a cleaner stock of Merchandise than at the Golden Rule and the
object of our clearance sale is to keep it clean and new. We are making price reductions in
an bummer Goods that will cause a clean sweep and you cannot afford to miss this oppor
tunity to buy seasonable wearing apparel at half value.
In our Suit Department-all Wash Suits, Waists and Skirts and light weight Woolen
ouits must go. Not one to be carried over.
All Summer Materials in our Dress Coods Department is being cleaned out at great
price reductions.
In our Men's Furnishings Department-Summer Underwear, Hosiery, Shirts and Neck
wear is being sold in a way that means a big saving to you.
THE EVENING STATESMAN SATURDAY, AUGUST 5, 1906.
MADE A HANDSOME PRESENT
B. F. CULP HAS REMEMBERED
HIS OLD CHURCH AT RAY
MOND, ILLINOIS.
Gave It Two Collection Plates Made
From Oregon Myrtle—Manufactur
ed in Walla Walla.
The Montgomery News, printed at
Hillsboro, 111., and one of the best and
cleanest newspapers published in the
state, has this to say of B. F. Culp
of Walla Walla:
"Last Sunday Mrs. B. F. Culp of
Walla Walla, Washington, in behalf of
her husband, presented to the Pres
byterian church at Raymond, two
very handsome collection plates. These
plates are made of Oregon myrtle, a
very fine and costly wood, and they
are beautifully carved and polished.
They were manufactured by the White
house-Crawford company of Walla
Walla, especially for the Raymond
church under the direction of Mr.
Culp. On the bottom of the plates is
the following inscription: 'Presented
to the Presbyterian church of Ray
mond, Illinois, with the compliments
of B. F. Culp of Walla Walla, Wash
ington. Manufactured by the White
house-Crawford company, June, 1905."
"The elates are certainly very hand
some and it is unnecessary to state
that they are highly appreciated by the
members of the Raymond church, not
only on account of their beauty and
value but because they indicate that
Mr. Culp has not forgotten his old
friends in the town where he spent
so many happy and prosperous years.
"It may interest our readers to know
the Crawford of the Whitehouse-
Crawford company, is John M. Craw
ford, who at one time was in the lum
ber business at Raymond, and he is
now one of the prinicapal stockholders
in the Walla Walla firm. They are
one of the largest firms and manufac
turers in the northwest, with a capi
tal stock of $100,000, and their sales
average $1000 per day.
"By the way we have incidentally
learned that Mr. Culp is preparing to
build himself an elegant residence in
Walla Walla, His many friends in
this county will be glad to learn that
he is prospering in his new home even
beyond his brightest expectations."
NEW LINES COMPLETED
Farmers Rural Telephone System Is
Increasing.
The Waitsburg Rural Telephone
company's system is making a healthy
growth and in the past three weeks
about 20 new phones have been added.
Three new lines have just been con
nected in at the central office in the
Par ktheater building, and Chet Bab
cock, who has charge, states that an
other line will soon be installed. The
new line will start from near Bolles
and go up the Touchet. The Spring
Valley line has been divided and is
now designated as the KeiSer line Nos.
1 and 2. The other new line is known
as the Tony Heights line. There is
also a proposition on foot to extend
the rural system to Starbuck and con
nection with that point may be looked
for in the near future, says the Ga
zette.
Owing to the rapid growth of the
system the switch board which is now
in use is greatly overtaxed and a
board of larger capacity is needed.
The officers of the company are con
sidering installing a 200-line board,
The Golden Rule
such a board would handle the busi
ness for some time to come. At the
present time about 250 phones are in
use.
♦ The Churches ♦
♦ *
German Evangelical Lutheran
churches, J. Oertel pastor, residence
624 Lincoln street—Service in church
on Maple street, between Third and
Fourth, at 9 a. m. Sunday school at
10:30 a. m. Services in church on
corner of Lincoln and Clinton streets
at 11 a. m. Sunday school at 10 a, m.
Park Street Baptist Church, Jos. H.
Beaven pastor—Sunday school 9:45, B.
Y. P. U 7 p. m. Preaching 11 a. m. and
8 p. m. Subject morning sermon, "A
sermon, "One Sinner's Sin." Prayer
meeting Thursday at 8 p. m. These
services are held in union with the
Presbyterian church, the Sunday
morning services being held in their
building, corner First and Birch, the
other services in the new building of
the Park Street Baptist church.
Wilbur Memorial M. E. Church.
Robt. J. Reid pastor—Sunday School
9:45, class meeting 12 m., Epworth
League 7 p. m. Preaching 11 a. m.
and 8 p. m. Prayer meeting Thursday
vening at 8 o'clock. Rev. Charles Mac
Caughey will preach morning and
evening.
First Presbyterian Church —Sunday
School 9:45. "Preaching at 11 a. m.
Rev. Jos. H. Beaven of the Park
Street Baptist church will preach in
the morning. The evening service and
the Thursday evening prayer meet
ing will be held in union with that
church at their tent on corner of Park
and East Alder streets.
First Methodist Episcopal Church-
Rev. Henry Brown, D. D., pastor—Sun
day School 9:45, class meeting 12.15,
Epworth League 7 p. m. Preaching 11
a. m. and 8 p. m. Subject morning ser
mon, "Looking Unto Jesus;" subject
evening sermon, "Temperance." Pray
er meeting Thursday at 8 p. m. Mrs.
Bailey, national organizer W. C. T. U.,
will speak in the evening. A welcome
to all.
First Baptist Church, Frederick K.
Fowler pastor—Sunday School 9:45,
B. Y. P. U 6:50. Preaching 11 a. m.
and 8 p. m. Subject morning sermon,
"The Fear Producing Cloud;" subject
for evening sermon, "This Man Re
ceiveth Sinners and Eateth With
Them." Prayer meeting Thursday at
8 p. m.
Salvation Army, 224 W. Main street:
11 a. m. Holiness; 2:30 p. m., Sunday
School and Bible Class; 8 p. m., fare
well meeting and address by Adjutant
Loney. Band of Love meets Thurs
days at 3:15 p. m. Meetings every
evening. Adjutant Loney and family
and Captain Bolles will farewell Sun
day. Welcome to the new officers will
take place Wednesday, August 9.
All Talking Machines now sold on
the installment plan—Stanley Music
House.
Everybody cordially invited to at
tend the grand opening at the Crown
saloon, corner Second and Alder, Sat
urday night, August 5.
SPECIAL RATES BUFFALO N. V.,
AND RETURN VIA N. P. RY.
$78.00, on sale Augrust 14 and 15;
limit 90 days, west of Chicago. Stop
overs allowed on return trip only. For
particulars inquire at W. & C. R.
ticket office. J. P. GOODHUE,
F. F. ROOT, Agent Agent.
S. B. CALDERHEAD,
G. F. & P. A.
TEDDY NOT FIRST ONE TO PAY
PRESIDENT BENJAMIN HARRISON
ALSO REFUSED TO TRAVEL
ON RAILROAD PASSES.
He Also Forced Newspaper Men to
Purchase Tickets to Ride on
His Special Train.
A short time ago when President
Roosevelt returned from his western
trip and paid the expenses of himself
and party, he received many commen
datory notices from the press.
When Secretary Bonaparte declined
to accept railroad passes it was hailed
in some quarters as a "new departure."
Mr. Roosevelt is not the first presi
dent to pay his railroad bills, and Sec
retary Bonaparte is not the first cabi
net officer to refuse railroad courtesies.
When Benjamin Harrison was elected
president, and was about to visit the
capital to be inaugurated, the Penn
sylvania railroad tendered him a spe
cial train and free transportation for
himself and party. The party was to
include himself, Mrs. Harrison, his
daughter and her husband, his son
and his wife, Mr. Miller, who was to
become attorney general, his private
secretary and two stenographers.
Mr. Harrison accepted the special
train, but declined the free transpor
tation and insisted on paying full
rates for the whole party. Not only
this, but the Pullman company tender
ed a car to two newspaper men, and
they invited some half dozen other cor
respondents to ride with them to
Washington. Permission was asked of
Mr. Harrison to attach this car to his
special train, and it was granted only
on condition that the newspaper men
pay their transportation. although
each had a pass from the road.
Reduced rates for the round trip on
account of the inauguration had been
made, but did not become effective un
til midnight of the day Mr. Harrison
left Indianapolis, so to give the cor
respondents the benefit of this reduc
ed rate, the railroad company placed
an agent on the train with tickets,
which he was not to sell or deliver
until after the train reached Colum
bus, 0., which was about midnight.
There was another little incident
connected with this trip that is well
remembered by the newspaper men. In
granting his permission to accompany
him, the president-elect had exacted a
promise that the newspaper men
should not take any liquors with them,
nor should the car in which they trav
eled be stocked with liquors.
The promise was readily given and
all went merrily until a little before
daylight the next morning when the
president's son came rushing into the
newspaper car calling for whisky. His
father had been taken suddenly and
violently ill with cramp colic. The call
was no sooner made than at least half
a dozen well filled flasks were tendered
him.
From that time the newspaper men
were permitted to enjoy their little nips
without fear of' objection from the
president.
Reunion of Baer Family.
READING, Pa., Aug. s.—The sixth
annual reunion of the Baer family was
held today at Kutztown Park and was
largely attended. Addresses were de
livered by Dr. S. A. Baer of Harris
burg, and J. W. Mayne of Allentown.
Don't forget the opening at the
Crown saloon, Second and Alder, Sat
lrday night, August 5.
PAGE THREE
t
WILL TEST THE OREGON LAW
WALLA WALLA SHEEPMEN BRING
SUIT IN CIRCUIT COURT AT
LA GRANDE.
Want Stock Inspector Restrained From
Collecting Tax on Sheep Grazing
in Union County.
William P. Reser and twelve other
extensive owners of sheep in Walla
Walla and Franklin county have com
menced suit in the circuit court at La
Grande against S. M. Goff, stock in
spector of Union county. The suit is
the outcome of an agreement reached
several months ago in Walla Walla
by the sheep men to test the validity
of the migratory sheep law of Ore
gon, an act that was passed by the
last legislature. The law contains a
provision that all sheep brought into
, the state are subject to a tax of 20
cents per head.
At the present time the Walla Walla
sheep owners haye about 50,000 sheep
on the range in Union county, and the
stock inspector is endeavoring to col
lect the 20 cent tax on each head.
The plaintiffs allege in their com
plaint that the law is unconstitutional
for the following reasons: That such
tax is not uniform and equal rate of
assessment or taxation, and is hofc a
tax upon valuation but upon numbers;
that it deprives the owners of stock
and property without due process of
law; that it is an unlawful Interfer
ference with interstate commerce and
therefore a violation of the constitu
tion of the United States; that it taxes
the property of non-residents in a dif
ferent manner and to a greater extent
than the property of residents and
taxes one class of livestock and not
another, and taxes certain sheep and
not all sheep within the state.
The plaintiffs pray for an order of
the court restraining the stock inspect
or from collecting the tax.
A similar suit was commenced In
the circuit court of Umatilla county
several weeks ago, after the plaintiffs
in this suit had paid the tax under
protest.
MORTAR MIXERS STRIKE
Waitsburg Had iLttle Labor Trouble
This Week.
We guess Waitsburg can put on
metropolitan airs as well as Walla
Walla, says the Gazette. The mortar
mixers at the Exchange bank building
walked out Monday morning and
building operations were tied up until
Tuesday, when the contractors were
successful in finding a man to take
the job at the old price and the wheels
of progress are again running smooth
ly. The difficulty arose over wages,
the workmen asking an increase of 50
cents a day, which was refused by the
contractor.
Eddy Organ Concert Friday night.
Whitman College Chapel.
Good Meats, Fresn and Salt Fish,
at People'n Market. Phone 92, 11
South Th* d Street, A E. Augustavo,
Prop.
The regular quarterly Teachers' Ex
aminations will be held In the county
court room Thursday, Friday and Sat
urday. August 10, 11 and 12, 1905. Ex
amination begins at 9 a. m.
J. E. MYERS.
County Superintendent

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