OCR Interpretation


The Evening statesman. (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, October 14, 1905, Image 9

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085421/1905-10-14/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for NINE

OPTICAL PARLORS H N_
v*U . anceS for accurate Eye testing. Can fit ..xSjgf^MtMbW
HB vei« 0 " t respond to light. Eyes Examined Free. ' a^**^rffiL
t ye Si£ht Specjaliitt
Co r 4«h "> d MBin S««. Phone 3<S D»cre« Bldg. |] |[
iiAnPr is at his worst in a poor, half-wornout harness He
I \ f\\ 'P doesn't look right and he doesn't feel right. Bring him
♦ VI II 1% BlwltOL to us and we can fit him out with something stylish
' I ' • and serviceable. No establishment in the city is better
♦ 1 i eas e .either in the matter of style and price.
j' ' CHARLES E. NYE, g main st.
| Did you know your coming bride
V » w » nts one of z - K - STRAIGHT'S
J&J • 22 k. Rings?
phone M«n 718 119 Main Street
The Statesman's prompt and efficient news service—both telepr&ph
and local—is what makes it so popular with the people of south*
astern Washington. Reading people are buying people.. Is your adver
tisement in the Statesman?
• COLGATES *
! Floating Bath Soap j
f is 'he best soap we have been able to buy for the money. J
! We have just received another shipment and have it on dis- «
a pjay in window. Remember it Floats. Try it. Only sc. 4
1 The Pioneer J3iMi«f Store J
I 6E. Main St. Goods Delivered Free of Charge Phone 137 4
m r - - I AT THE MEAL TABLE *
' \\ \ Stall! beer is almost indispen- 9
t ' ■ Jj ;' Bf% sable —it's so palatable and re- *
t .. r A "] •■"tBB -ling, it so aids the diges ion •
• aml assimilation of foo< J. None •
• Mr-4'- ' l/p V\ ! of lhat "distressed" feeling, •
•5t ffi t \|\~Sy when Stahl beer aids appetite *
: 1 fKI MM stahl Brewing l iig %\ :
* 1 The WHITE HOUSE | *
Suits
& % It is a matter of speculation among the majority of well dressed men as to UIIU
just what causes that "something" in the character and appearence of our - _
clothes so often described as "well bred" and "aristocratic." Hi I wl
q The quality of the cloth is apparent but that does not entirely explain the | 0
to know manifest superiority of our clothes over others. ■ *
what well CJ If you knew all the little niceties of tailoring, all the little details of clothing vfl" vr
dressed excellence as we do, you would know that Quality--Quality--Quality is ===——==
men will the secret of it all.
weatthis OIAPP
Fall and V/VvJ "
Winter, WHITE HOUSE QUALITY TELLS
look over = COfIITS
the White
House i I 5
,ck r THE WHITE HOUSE
m R. E. GUICHARD THE CLOTHIER | $^()
THE EVENING STATESMAN SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1905
REDLIGHT DISTRICT MUST 60
COUNCIL ABOUT READY TO BAN
ISH TENDERLOIN FROM
PRESENT QUARTERS.
Mayor l s Heartily In Accord With the
Movement —Move District to
Some Other Locality.
"The ordinance passed last May and
effective on October 6, prohibiting
denizens of the redlight district from
occupying cribs located on the ground
floor is not dead; neither is it sleep
ing," said a member of the council
yesterday afternoon. "The mayor and
council have about decided that the
redlight district on Rose street, be
tween Second and Fourth streets, must
be removed to some less conspicuous
locality and I would not be surprised
if some action is taken within the
next two weeks. Just where the
women of the half-world can be quar"
tered is a matter 'hat will require
considerable studying to figure out
it has got to come."
Mayor Stands Pat.
Mayor Hunt when questioned re
garding the stand taken by several
members of the council favoring the
removal of the redlight district to
some other portion of the city said.
"I believe I made it clear in my mes
sage to the council last August that
the redlight district should be cleaned
up and I see no reason why I should
change my views now. As a matter of
fact I look for some action to be taken
at an early date. I realize that it is a
matter that will develop some compli
cations before the change is accom
plished but the time I believe has
come when the business district should
be free from the contaminating influ
ence of the redlight district."
New Directors for. Equitable.
NEW YORK, Oct. 14— The trustees
of the Equitable today elected John B.
Kernar, of Utica, N. T., and William
Redfield of Brooklyn, directors. They
prepared a circular t 0 be sent to poli
cy-holders asking them to express an
opinion on the selection of men from
their number to be voted upon by the
trustees for directors in December.
MAYOR HUNT TO 60 EAST
WILL LEAVE WITH MRS. HUNT
TOMORROW FOR A THREE
WEEKS' TRIP.
Visit Chicago, New York and Boston—
With the Mayor Away Interest
Centers in Paving Matters.
Mayor and Mrs. Gilbert Hunt will
leave tomorrow evening for an extend*
ed eastern trip, expecting to visit while
away, Chicago, New York and Boston*
where their son, Eugene, is attending
the Institute of Technology, one of
the largest and best equipped technical
schools in the world. The trip east
will be made over the Union Pacific.
Chicago will be the first stopping point,
where Mawor and Mrs. Hunt expect
to stay for a few days. From Chica
ga they will go on to New York and
spend a few days and from there to
Boston to visit their son Eugene.
With Mayor Hunt's opposition out Of
the way there is considerable specula
tion as to what course the council will
take in street paving matters and
whether or not an effort will be made
o railroad through an ordinance giv
inp.g the contracts for paving Fourth,
Elm and Spokane streets to the War
ren Construction company. The coun
cil at the next regular meeting will
select some member to serve as acting
mayor during Mayor Hunt's absence.
Kicked to Death.
CHESTER, P., Oct. 14.—John S.
Summergill, aged 21, a member of the
Frankl' football team, died yesterday
at the Chester hospital from injuries
received in a game between the Frank
lin team and the Homestead eleven.
Summergill was first rendered uncon
scious by a blow in the stomach. He
was resuscitated and resumed playing.
About ten minutes later he was acci
dentally kicked in the temple and
again lapsed into unconsciousness.
He revived again, however, but, in
stead of continuing thr play, watched
the game from the side lines. After
the game was over Summergill was
sent to the Chester hospital, wnere he
died. His death was caused by hem
orrhage. The football player was mar
ried only three months ago.
CAPTAIN TAGGART WINS SUIT
COURT GRANTS HIM DIVORCE ON
GROUNDS SET FORTH IN
COMPLAINT.
Mrs. Taggart Suffering From Nervous
Prostration Was Not Able to
to Hear Decree.
"WOOSTER, 0., Oct. 14.—Mrs. Tag
gart collapsed this morning and was
confined to her bed. She was unable
to attend court to hear the divorce
decree.
A large crowd was present at the
court room this afternoon. Attorney
Smyser for Mrs. Taggart was the first
attorney to arrive. Captain Taggart
followed with Attorney Wertz. He
shook hands with many friends. Mrs.
Taggart's father, John Manville, of
Chicago, was present with the woman's
attorneys. Judge Eason entered and
depositing papers on the desk, retired
to his chambers for several minutes.
After the formal opening of the court
he began rendering his decision.
He set forth a synopsis of the claims
of the plaintiff and defendant in the
petition, cross bill, amended petition
and answers, and then announced that
Captain Taggart was granted a di
vorce. The judge said the scope of .the
case resolved itself into a very small
compass. "Both sides made extrava
gant claims in their pleas," said the
court. He then gave a brief history of
the principals and said the evidence
showed it was a love match. He re
cited their life in different places and
said there was not a ripple during
the first seven years of their married
life.
The judge said the charges against
Captain Rythers were unfounded. He
did not uphold the charges of habitu
al drunkenness against either princi
pal.
Heinze Denied a Hearing.
HELENA, Mont., Oct. 14—In the
case of Edward Hickey et al for the
Heinze interests against the Anacon
da Mining Co., known as the Nipper
case, the supreme court not only de
nied the application of Heinze to argue
the case orally but declined to grant
a rehearing at all.
PAGE NINE
DOIN6S AROUND WHITMAN
GRADUATING RECITAL BY MISS
BADE WILL BE A MUSICAL
EVENT.
Whitman Debating Council Will Meet
Next Week to Select Manager
and President.
The event of the week in Whitman
conservatory circles wa s the announce
ment of the graduation recital of Miss
Bertha Bade. Miss Bade will render
a program of great excellence and dif
ficulty In the college chapel on the
evening of October 27.
The recently created Whitman de
bate council has elected Rev. Austin
Rice and Professor W. A. Bratton
two of Whitman's debating coaches, to
be members of the council for the cur
rent year. The council will meet early
next week to choose a president an«l
manager.
Professor T. J. Pennell will reor
ganize his sight-singing class next
week. A large number of students In
college and academy have urged talm
so do this.
The principal feature of the Athen
aeum meeting Thursday night was a
talk by Otto B. Rupp on "Webster as
a Statesman." The meeting was
Websterian all the way through the
whole program being composed of quo
tations and selections from the "Hon
of America" and papers on different
phazes of his life and services.
Gems Lost 30 Years Ago.
NEW YORK, Oct. 14.—A remark
able case of recovery of missing prop
erty came to light today when it was
learned that Hiss Jennie Corwin of
Brooklyn had received through the
mail a necklace of valuable pearls that
she either lost at a wedding, or which
was stolen from her thirty years ago.
Miss Corwin is the daughter of Ma
jor B. R. Corwin, a manager of the
Metropolitan Insurance company.
Friday morning, when the postman
called at the Corwin home he left a
little box wrapped in brown papers.
Miss Corwin was amazed when she
broke the seal and found the necklace
she had lost thirty years ago.

xml | txt