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The Evening statesman. (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, January 06, 1906, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085421/1906-01-06/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE SIX
CANADIAN RATE LAW DRASTIC
DOMINION'S RAILROAD COMMIS
SION HAS GREAT POWER OV
TR AN SPORT ATI ON CO.'S.
Has Complete Authority Over Actual
Rates, Including the Power to Dis
allow Tariffs.
In the current issue of the Railway
World, Professor S. J. McLean, Can
ada's former special commissioner for
the department of railways and canals,
presents an exhaustive exposition of
the Dominion's new railway rate law.
The law —barring, perhaps, some pro
visions of the English statutes —is the
most drastic measure in existence. It
gives to the commission, composed of
three members holding office for a
term of ten years, the following gen
eral powers:
First —Complete jurisdiction over
railway location, railway construction,
railway improvements, over the
cal conditions of railways and over
their equipment.
Second —Complete control over rail
way operation, safety appliances, rail
way crossings.
Third —The authority to compel rail
ways to obey the laws, general and
special under which they operate,
thereby making the commission the
genera] supervisor and enforcer of
railway laws.
Fourth—Complete authority over the
actual rates. Including the power to
disallow tariffs, say what is a rea
sonable and just rate and compel the
substitution at once of the commis
sion's rate for that of the railway.
Fifth —The commission is constituted
the sole judge of facts.
Sixth —The commission is constitut
ed as a court and is not amenable to
the courts.
Seven—Practically the only appeal is
to the cabinet, which may over-rule
the commission, or an appeal to the su
preme court direct on a question which
the commission deems a question ot
law, or upon a question of jurisdiction.
The courts, however, do not have the
right to over-rule the commission.
Eighth—The commission must pre
vent pooling of traffic.
In scope the powers granted to the
Canadian railway commission resem
ble those possessed by the English
board of trade. The broadness of this
Bcope is illustrated by the following
tilings which the commission may do:
Make regulations governing the speed
of trains In cities and towns.
Fix regulations pertaining to safety
appliances.
Pass upon disputes in respect to all
railway crossings and junctions.
Determine disputes between the rail
roads and the farmers with respect to
drainage.
Pass upon railway location plans and
inspection to see that railways and
railway bridges are kept in safe con
dition.
The commission may disallow any
tariff that violates this provision. Un
der such conditions the railway must
substitute a satisfactory rate or the
commission may prescribe one.
Grover Martin in Jail.
PENDLETON. Ore., Jan. 6.—Grovei
|33388E5g31fr
rC-
Working uniformly and perfectly, it makes
the bread and cake always light and beautiful,
and there is never a waste of good flour, sugar,
butter and eggs.
Finer food; saving of money; saving of the
health of the family: the last is the greatest
economy of all.
The official Government tests show Royal
Baking Powder to be an absolutely pure and
healthful grape cream of tartar baking pow
der, and care should be taken to prevent the
substitution of any other brand in its place.
ROYAL BAKING POWDER CO., NEW YORK
Martin is in the county Jail, his bonds
men having surrendered him into the
sheriff Wednesday night. Martin
stands convicted of the crime of man.
slaughter for killing O. N. Preston In
Freewater last May. He was sentenc
ed to serve ten years in the peniten
tiary and this has been affirmed by
the supreme court.
Yesterday morning an order was is.
sued increasing the amount of bail to
$0,000. Martin's bondsmen being una
ble to secure bail, decided to turn the
young man over to the sheriff until
they can secure the amount of bail fix
ed by Judge Ellis. It is not believed
that they will be able to secure the
necessary amount and Martin must re.
main in the sheriff's hands until he is
taken to the penitentiary.
REWARD TOO SMALL.
Fugitive Finds Difficulty in Getting
Arrested at Pierre.
UIERRE, S. D., Jan. 6.—Several days
ago Sheriff Logan of this county, was
approached by an individual who said
he had escaped from custody in "Kan
sas City and desired to return to face
the charge against him, and wanted
the sheriff to take him in charge and
return him to the Missouri authorities
for the reward. The Missouri authori
ties were notified and replied that the
man was wanted all right, and that a
reward of $50 was out for his return.
After figuring out the cost of two
tickets to Kansas City and a return
trp for one, Sheriff Logan decided that
he was not looking for any such snap,
and told the Missouri people to come
on and he would show them their man.
They evidently figured the same way,
and after the man had loafed around
here several days in his attempt to
break into jail, he vanished as he had
come, no one apparently knowing
from where or to where. He is sup
posed to have made his way to some
point where an officer could figure
within his expenses, on a $50 deal be
fore he found any one willing to pay
his fare back to Missouri.
TALK ON RELIGIOUS TOPICS
UNIQUE FEATURE TO BE INTRO
DUCED AT WHITMAN COL
LEGE CHAPEL,
A unique feature of chapel exercises
at Whitman college next week will be
a series of talks on religious subjects
each morning by President S. B. L.
Penrose. The ordinary chapel exercises
which begin at 10 o'clock will be pro
longed probably hal fan hour on Mon
day. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday. The talks will be on the
"Importance of the Spiritual Life." The
subject will be treated in its various
phases as especially applicable to
students. The privilege of hearing
these talks will not be confined to the
student body however, as any of the
citizens of the town are cordially in
vited to attend.
Oregon Northern Railway.
SALEM, Ore., Jan. 6.—The Oregon
Northern Railway company filed arti
cles of incorporation this morning. Its
purpose is to build a railroad through
Morrow and Gilliam counties with
Hardman and Blalocks as terminals.
Headquarters will be Heppner.
WILL TRY TO RE6AIN LAND
GOVERNMENT IS PREPARING FOR
TITANIC STRUGGLE TO RE
COVER ACRES OF LAND.
Great Bulk of Timber Lands in Wash
ington and Oregon in Hands of
Fevi Men,
The United States government is
preparing for one of the greatest le
gal struggles in its history soon to be
inaugurated when an attempt will be
made to wrest from the great eastern
timber kings and stockgrowers the mil
lions of acres of public lands fraudu
lently acquired.
The move marks the second step in
the land fraud prosecutions, the first
being the detection and conviction of
the thieves who have plundered the
public domain. Vast tracts of land in
Washington, Oregon, California and
other western states are at stake. They
are now held by millionaires who will
spend their treasures freely in order to
retain their booty. Fortified in their
possession by money and political in
fluence, their position might well seem
impregnable, but the government is
preparing for a titanic struggle. Civil
suits have been instituted already in
a few cases, but these are but the scat
tering skirmish fire which marks the
opening of battle all along the line.
Through the frauds perpetrated on
the government, the great bulk of the
timber lands in Oregon and Washing
ton are now concentrated in the hands
of half a dozen holders. Some of the
land thus held was lawfully acquired,
but it is estimated that at least two
thirds of it was obtained by fraud.
One tract in Southern Oregon larger
than Multnomah county i s held under
a single ownership. Another tract ly
ing east of the Cascade range is equal
in area to Wheeler county. Equally
large tracts are held in Washington
and Idaho.
Large areas were acquired in both
states by Benson and Hyde, the noto
rious California operators, against
whom a dozen indictments are pending.
C. A. Smith of Minneapolis; Pillsbury,
the Weyerhausers, Hyde of Wisconsin,
Cook, of Chicago: Walker, of Milwau
kee; Goddard, Withes and others who
amassed fortunes in eastern timber
were quick to see the possibilities that
the west afforded, and they bought tens
of thousands Of acres with scant at
tention to the means by which title
was secured.
Suits have already been instituted
for the recovery of 100,000 acres of
land in Washington and Oregon, but as
yet the government has scarcely made
a beginning in the task of recovering
its stolen land. There are other land
grabbers whose operations have been
on a gigantic scale who have hitherto
escaped notoriety. As rapidly as pos
sible suits will be instituted to compel
them to disgorge.
United States Oistrict Attorney W T . C.
Bristol, has been engaged ever since
his appointment in the preparation for
the coming struggle. He states that
the government's plans are more far
reaching than the public has imagined.
TURNS OUT A GOLD BRICK.
Kaiser's Dream of German GibraJtar Is
Doomed to Disappointment.
BERLIN, Jan. 6.—Emperor William's
ambition to make of the island of Heli
goland, in the German ocean, acquired
from Great Britain, another Gibraltar,
is doomed to disappointment.
One of the disheartening New Tear's
gifts received by the kaiser was the
news that the island is gradually
crumbling away and that part of the
elaborate fortifications have collapsed.
The latest official report received by
the emperor from Heligoland says a
score of the great blocks of granite
forming the outer wall of the sea forts
have plunged into the water, the foun
dations having been eaten away. A
great breach now exisis which can on
ly be repaired by the construction of an
inner wall.
It appears that Great Britain made
a good bargain when she ceded Heli
goland to Germany 15 years ago for
numerous rights and privileges. The
island had even then begun to show the
erosive action of the turbulent waters
of the North sea. but now this has
been greatly increased.
The erosive process is also affesting
the commercial value of the island. The
inhabitants have become frightened at
the increasing action of the waves and
are gradually deserting their homes.
From a population of 4000 in IS9O, the
inhabitants of the island have decreas
ed to ISOO.
New Baptist Association.
ATHENA. Or.. Jan. 6. —A meeting
was held in this city Thursday by the
THE EVENING STATESMAN, WALLA WALLA, WASHINGTON.
Baptists of Umatilla county for the
purpose of forming a Umatilla County
Baptist association. This was done on
account of the eastern Oregon associa
tion being so large that the Umatilla
members decided to form one of its
own.
A constitution and by-laws were
adopted, and it was decided to hold ttye
first annual meeting of the association
in Athena, Tuesday, May 22, when a
session will be held. Ar
rangements have been perfected to se
cure a missionary for the Umatilla
Baptist association, who will devote his
entire time to work in this field, and
$115 was subscribed toward this
cause.
The following officers have been
elected to act for the association until
the first meeting, which will be held
in may:
Moderator, Frank K. Wells; assistant
moderator, W. W. Harris; clerk, G. L.
Hall; treasurer, J. T. Lieuallen.
Butte Miners Locked Out.
BUTTE, Mont., Jan. 6.—Three hun
dred and fifty miners and teamsters are
idle here as the result of the lockout of
ore haulers by contractors over the re.
fusal of the latter to increase the pay
of drivers 50 cents a day.
Dock Dewey Reaches Bermuda.
HAMILTON, Bermuda, Jan. 6.—The
United States tug Potomac, a member
of the fleet conveying the dock Dewey,
put in here today for coal and provis
ions. The Dewey was left 100 miles off
shore and will pass tomorrow.
AMUSEMENTS
Elks' Entertainment.
Much interest is being taken in the
entertainment to be given Monday
night at the High school auditorium
under the auspices of the Walla Walla
Elks.
The W 7 infield, Kansas, Courier,
March 31, 1905, says: The concert by
the Polmatier Sisters at the Grand last
night was well attended and gave
splendid satisfaction. The Elks, under
whose patronage they played here,
merit the thanks of all music lovers
for having brought this superb attrac
tion. The company is composed of fin
ished musicians, both with voice and
instruments. Every number was en-
thusiasticall encored, and the players
were liberal in response. The sisters
were assisted by Mr. Harry Woods,
who demonstrated himself the phe
nomenal player on the mandolin and
deserve individual mention. They ar«
blessed with great personal charm as
well as with musical talent and were
beautifully costumed."
Jerome K. Jerome.
Jerome K. Jerome, who appears at
Whitman chapel Monday evening with
Charles Battell Loomis in a humorous
recital, says he has been anxious for
a long time to visit and see the native
American on his own soil. Those who
are quite intimate with him say that
he will probably gather some Inter
esting material for future use from
his travels. This tour of America,
which began last October, is the first
to be made by the now famous author
of "Three Men in a Bout,"and as he
will soon return to England a great
deal of interest has been aroused
in his coming to Walla Walla, which
was brought about from the fact
that the jump from Salt Lake City
to the Sound would have been quite
a long one, so this city was fortunate
enough to be selected as a stopping
place.
Oper a Season.
In "El Capitan," which will be pre
sented by the Roscian Comis opera
company at the Keylor Grand on the
opening of their engagement, com.
mencing Monday, Jan. 8, Slaude Ams
den plays the title part, and his work
is stated to be not one whit inferior
to the celebrated original in the part,
De Wolf Hopper. Miss Hazel Daven
port plays "Estrella," and is said to
make a charming picture of that pretty
Spanish character, Lucia Nola sings Is.
Abel; Frank Walters, Count Hernando
Varrado; Hiliard Campbell, Scaramba;
John Dewey, Don Luiz Cazzaro; Jack
Leslie, Pozzo: and the chorus are seen
in a number of Souza military marches
and groupings which are said to be
characteristic and pleasing.
For cut 3, barns, bruises, H
sores, galls, barbed wire cuts 9
and all buna of man or
King Cactus Oil J
the only liniment that ■
heals without a scar. ■
15c., 50c., $1. (3 and $5 s<zes. B
Accept no substitute. V
Pharm.-ois! ■
Walla Walla, Wn. ™
The best recommendation I can give
Cleveland's Baking Powder is that I
use it in preference to all others.—
Mrs. A. Nelson, Walla Walla.
Where do You
Buy Your
Clothes ?
This is a very important matter, and still
many men appear to think it of no consequence.
They buy just anywhere they happen to see
something that strikes their fancy.
But, there's a difference in stores, as well
as in clothes.
Some stores go in for "cheapness" others
for quality.
Which do you prefer?
"You pay your money, and take your
choice."
If it is smartness of style, perfection of
fit, thorough reliability, at a fair price, you're
after, then this is the clothing store for 3*oll.
KELLOUGH CO.
The Men's Men. 101 Main St.
PLANS WORLD'S CONGRESS
PROPOSITION TO HOLD AN AN
NUAL MEETING OF MUNICI
PAL REPRESENTATIVES.
To Discuss Methods for Better Govern
ment of Large Cities and Com -
munitie?.
LONDON. Jan. 6.—Sir Edward Corn
wall, chairman of the London county
council, has issued to the press for
publication a proposal for an interna
tional congress of representatives of
capitals having a population of more
than 500,000, to meet annually for the
discussion of municipal methods. Sir
Edwin says he is encouraged to make
this suggestion by the good results
following the recent exchange oi
amenities between the London, county
council and the Paris municipal coun-
KEYLOR GRAND
J, E. Caven, Manager.
Phone 159
The Empire Theatre Company
TONIGHT AND TODAY'S MATINEE
FOR LAST TIME
"More Sinned
Against
Than Sinning"
I
SUNDAY NIGHT, JAN. 7th, 1906,
—By Request—
FAREWELL PERFORMANCE
I— Balcony Scene From Romeo and
Julie*.
ll— Dick's Uncle.
ciL He also proposes an exchange of
pupils between the schools controlled
by the municipalities holding member
ship in the congress. Several leading
Americans, to whom the proposition
was submitted expressed themselves- as
strongly in favor of the plan and de
clared themselves convinced that the
Neglecting Weak Kidneys
Is resignation without cause.
Stronk Kidneys don't need medicine, but weak Kidneys DO.
Proper attention to weak Kidneys means strong Kidneys again.
Neglect of weak Kidneys means lifelong suffering and often death.
IRVING'S BUCHU WAFERS
They contain just what Is wanted to remove the disease, heal the sore spo
t, and strengthen the whole system. They build up the shrunken walls of t
he Kidneys as no other remedy hasbeen found to do before.
Positively Purify the Blood
and being a purely vegetable compotun|d, free from all mineral drugs, do not
act on the bowels. They act directly on the weakened tissues and blood
vessels of the
Kidney and Urinary Organs
cleansing them of impurities and giving a feeling of renewed life and
vitality.
If you are suffering with pain In the back, scalding urine, or any other
kidney ill, try a box of
IRVING'S BUCHU WAFERS
Price, 50 Cents
THEY WILL CURE YOU
Sold by L. L. TALLMAN.
j nrify A tempt,ng morsel. ♦
+ "> ...'"'» th!, t v h " ,s the appetite and adds ♦
♦ $ If zt ' st to your morning meal, is our ♦
♦ succulent, juicy mutton}
♦ I rM or '«mb chops, choice tenderloin.?
J SfUjaMS fiU Sirl ° in ° r he, ' fsteaks - that give you I
I - -£"?Wi J[i Stamina for your 'lay's mental or I
♦•' '*£fflh V» ■ ' JBfe?sl Physieal labor - Our choice ham, +
+,\ \&?!r\ Lr- - /' ■ ha "" n " r sausa « e are appetizing ♦
J GUS HARRAS t
. . S ALDER ST. OPP. P. o. ♦
New President of Sa n Domingo.
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 6.—The
war department has been notified that
Vice President Caceres has been in
stalled as president of Santo Domingo,
pending impeachment proceedings
against Morales.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 190*.
great municipalities of the United
States would not be slow in recognizing
the value and importance of such con
gresses. A circular letter has been pre
pared, which will be sent to the may
ors of all cities of more than 500,0dJ
inhabitants in Europe a s well as in
the United States and Canada.
ttSN A*o WOMEN.
i.- j* ' Bit «• f- r unnatural
amm ',V ''"JMB ! " hawe inflammation*.
■B noi to imcturt ■ irrigations or ulcerations
Pr...„t. ro.t. ri „. ~ ? ■«»■« membrane*
IgtiHEEVAHSCHEMOLCo.
lflj^' V - V,: -gag Sold by Dn.Rl.ut
*' ' r Bent in piain wrapp**,
prepaid, fo»
f I 00. bottl»f 12.75.

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