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The Evening statesman. (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, January 12, 1906, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085421/1906-01-12/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
• If you select a bank with a •
4 record for strength and con- •
J scrvatism, on«" whose officers and #
• directors are a guarantee against ♦
• your money being used for spec- ♦
I ulation, then you can feel that
• your money is absolutely safe.
• The Farmers Savings Bank went *
4 through the panic of '93 and is • I
" still doing business at the same 9
• place under the same manage- ♦
t men?. Its Stockholders are all t j
« local citizens and taxpayers with » j
1 a personal responsibility for over 4 j
• f.v e million dollars. There can J
• be no element of risk in banking 4
• with such a bank. We do all +
• kinds of banking business, pay 4
• four per cent on time deposits •
• and our business is continually •
J growing. We solicit yours. «
• Our Trustees Are: «
I Levi Ankenv: J. H. Foster: ■
• G W. Kabcock; S. F Henderson; •
• Frances Dooley; A. H. Reynolds; J
G A- Kvans; G. H. Snell;
• W. P. Winans. '
• Our Officers Are: ♦
• W P. Winans, President. •
T G W Babcock. Vice President. ♦
• J.Chitwood, Cashier. •
• A a King, Acrlttaat Cashier. •
• The Farmers' Saving Bank. •
• Cor. Main & Second Sti. •
• Rees-Winans Bldg. ♦
A BANK'S
RESPONSIBILITY
Consists of
The amount of capital stock paid in.
The amount of Stockholders' liabili
ties (equal to the amount of capital
stock).
The amount of surplus and undivided
profits.
J. L. ELAM'S BANK has
Capital stock paid in $100,000
Stockholders' liabilities 100,000
Undiv ded profits 7,000
Responsibility $207,000
The men who manage this Bank are
careful, conservative, active, and have
had many years of successful business
experience; hence its safety is abso
lutely assured.
J. L. Elam President
Wm. H. Steen Vice President
H. H. Marshall. Cashier
* «• «
i $
# S W. OABT >esi.lent. ♦
m B. F. CTJLP, Cashier. ♦
4 Capital X 50.00*. ♦
i General Banking Business *
W Interest paid on time deposits w
▼ and saving accounts. V
RELIEF FOR LADIES
FRENCH TANSY WAFERS.
Original and only genuine put up In
yellow wrapper with Crown trade
mark. For sale by leading druggists.
L. L. TALLMAN
Furnishes the wholnsale trade.
Eyes examined and
1< issos ground to fit
*Vt3ysS. * any eye at the Curry
Optical parlors, Cor.
4th and Main Sts., Dacres, Bldg. Phone
345.
Headquarters for
Smokers' Sundries
Cigars that you will enjoy.
UPTON'S
2nd and Alder
Wanted—Thirty head of big geldings
from 5 to S years old; well broke to
harness and saddle; 1100 ibs. to 1250
lbs. weight; 15 1-2 to 16 hands high.
Persons having such horses for sale,
please bring them to Model Stable,
Mcßride's old stand, on Thursday, Jan.
11. 1906. D. J. W. Woods.
T| Ip" CON VL YIN 3
I I Lt" SEATTLE BUSINESS PROPERTY
BONDS FULL OWNERS EARNINGS
PAY I 6 %. PER ANNUM NET FROM
\ RENTALS AND INCREASE VALUE
OFFERED BY THE TRUSTEE COMPANY INVESTMENT BANKERS.SEATTLE. WN.
DOUGHERTY STOLE MONEY
PEORIA SCHOOL MAN SHOWN BY
INVESTIGATION TO BE A
PRINCE OF SWINDLERS.
Everett Auditing Committee Will Pre
sent Scathing Report Censuring
the School Board.
CHICAGO, Jan. 12—Startling dis
closures will be made in a report on
the defalcation of former Superin
tendent of Schools Newton C. Dough
erty, which will be presented to the
Peoria school board tonight. The
school man will be shown to have been
one of the greatest swindlers the
world has ever known. The report,
which is being prepared by the Everett
Audit company, embraces the records
of the last seven years, and will show
total shortage of more than $600,000
in that time. This is more than the
wildest conjecture previously had made
the steal for the whole twenty-five
years of Dougherty's trusteeship.
The auditors still are at work on
the books and from a preliminary sur
vey of the whole task, it is shown that
the shortage for eighteen years will
exceed $1,000,000.
Bank Responsible.
It has been disclosed by members of
the investigating committee that not
only will the report of the audit com
mittee scathingly censure the mem
bers of the present and the past school
boards for their neglect of duty, but
will declare boldly that the liquidated
Peoria National bank is responsible
for the loss to the school fund.
This charge against the bank is
based upon the fact that the pecula
tions were carried out by Dougherty
by means of forged and fictitious
school scrip, which was cashed by the
bank of which Dougherty was pres
ident. The scrip was cashed without
proper indorsement. The report will
assert the criminal liability of the bank
officials.
News of this trend of the investiga
tion has produced consternation in
Peoria financial circles.
Dividends Stopped.
When the auditors first discovered
conclusive proof of the bank's respon
sibility, court action was taken imme
diately to stop the payment of further
dividends by the receiver. The order
was not executed, however, until 30
per cent of the claims had been paid.
If it is finally established that the bank
owes the school board the amount of
the defalcation these dividends will
have to be withdrawn and the conse
quence will be that the bank's affairs
will be tied up in the courts for sev
eral years.
The report, which is heing rapidly
completed,, will be read in the open
meeting of the school board. One of
the conclusions which will be drawn
by the author is that, in all the twen
ty-five years of Dougherty's official
connection with the public schools of
Peoria, the accounts of the school
board never received proper auditing
In this respect the members of the
board in past years and the members
of the finance committee will he
charged with neglect of their public
trust.
Got $50,000 a Year.
One of the most interesting features
of the report is an analysis which will
show the magnitude of Dougherty's
operations. In none of the last seven
years, it is said, did he steal less than
$50,000, and in the last three years he
got away with $300,000. '
Twenty-seventh Child.
CHICAGO, Jan. 12.—For the twenty
seventh time Jonathan Allen Monroe,
aged 62, has been Drought to a reali
zation of the fact that he is a father.
The latest reminder came yesterday in
the shape of a healthy baby boy, mak
ing the fifteenth living child.
Mr. Monroe is a cattle buyer at the
Union stockyards, and is well known
about tha district both as an enemy
ruvSTiKUYfii. riiui
vTL-V UHgTnnl an<l Only Genuine.
Ai.mvT.lial,;.. Ludlav isk I>ru«l«
fc,»< S&JjM for CHICUKSTEII'S KXOLIKII
tf*Sk£S*ijfif>©\ in UUa »ui Vu!<! rujiilli* bout naM
"fe. —OjA<a viih L!ue ribbon. Toko no olaer. Kcfose
T»i fif '| ° li2r, ' r i l "" B *ul»»UtuUon» aud Iratta-
I Vb J£ lumiv. br I'orttonlura, Testimonial*
fa ud "\l : l!ct fur l.ml Us*," isa Uttmr, by rr
_X L' tarn Matt. 10.OW Saldbj
V ~~ I «HPruiCi.u. <.;. holler l''j«ulsnl Co.,
of race suicide and because of his
general affability.
Jonathan Allen Monroe was born in
Swansea, Mass., April 27, 1543. When
he was IS years old he married Isa
bella Hunter of Albany. Mrs. Monroe
died after having given birth to
twelve children, six of whom are still
living. Some time later Mi* Monroe
married his present wife, Ella, who is
now 39 years old.
Bingham Demands Salute.
NEW YORK, Jan. 12. —General
Theodore Bingham, police commission
er, surprised police headquarters this
morning by taking a quiet stroll about
the building instead of going direct to
his office. He soon met Policeman
Matthew McCoy, who gave the com
missioner the customary salute in the
department, a sort of nondescript any.
old-thing. The general almost snorted
at the burlesque salute and stopped
McCoy.
"I want you to learn the army sa
lute," said the general. "Nothing like
that here."
The general then Illustrated the
proper salute and McCoy followed his
example and saluted properly. During
his stroll the commissioner told sev
eral other policemen the same thing
and made it plain that the army salute
must be used hereafter in the depart
ment.
THE SENATORIAL PRIMARIES
TENNESSEE VOTERS ARE EX
PRESING PREFERENCE
TODAY.
HENDERSON, Tenn., Jan. 12.—The
senatorial primaries are held today in
the twenty-fifth senatorial district,
which comprises the counties Madison,
Chester and Henderson. The situation
is rather interesting in this district.
Seceral prominent democrats have
been suggested to oppose the nomina
tion of Hon. T. W. Pope of Madison
county. Pope represented this district
in the last legislature and the temper
ance element was not pleased with his
record and is, therefore, strongly op
posed to his return to the senate.
Among the prominent democrats men
tioned to contest his nomination is
Hon. J. D. Johnson who made a bril
liant record for himself in favor of
the extension of the Adams law. The
result of the primaries is awaited with
considerable interest. A strong vote
is expected.
DEVELOPMENT OF OREGON
PORTLAND BUSINESS MEN AR
RANGE EXCURSION THROUGH
CALIFORNIA.
PORTLAND, Ore., Jan. 12. —A joint
meeting of the Oregon Press associa
tion and the Oregon Development
league is held here today, which will
so to speak, form the prelude to the
commercial excursion to California to
be undertaken under the auspices ot
the Oregon Development league. The
excursion will start from here in a
special train tomorrow. At the
meeting, which convened here today,
various matters pertaining to the com
mercial, industrial and intellectual de
velopment of the state of Oregon will
be discussed. The good roads question,
various agricultural and horticultural
questions, traffic matters and other
important subjects will come up for
consideration and plans will be con
sidered to effectively boom the vari
ous interests of this state. The at
tendance is very large and among
those present are many prominent
nemspapermen from all parts of the
state, as well as a large number of
prominent merchants and manufac
turer.
Cincinnati's Lid Is On.
CINCINNATI, Jan. 12.—For the first
time in twenty years the lid is on here.
Mayor Demsey. following a communi
cation from the Ministerial Alliance
law enforcement committee, has or
dered Chief of Police Milliken to close
every saloon at midnight, and stop
gambling using every police power,
smashing in the doors with axes if
necessary. The order is an absolute
one, and all the prominent down-town
saloons have agreed to obey it. The
last drink is to be sold at ten minutes
before midnight and the bartenders
are to be out at the stroke of 12, with
the doors locked and blinds up. Dem
sey has made no order regarding
Sunday closing, but it is generally
thought that Governor Pattison will
>rder it.
GASOLINE WOOD SAW. PHONE 502.
THE EVENING STATESMAN, WALLA WALLA, WASHINGTON.
READY TO LOSE POPOLARITY
PRESIDENT KNOWS THE DANGER
OF SITUATION BUT AC
CEPTS THE CHALLENGE.
Dolliver-Hepburn Bill Is Now Viewed
as Measure Acceptable to the
Administration.
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 12.—
President Roosevelt has expressed a
willingness to be sacrificed personally,
provided he can secure the enactment
of a rate bill, moderate in character,
which will make an important advance
toward control over the carrying com
panies, now the greatest corporate
power this country ever has known.
He realizes the danger to himself
that the situation presents, and yet, he
accepts the challenge manfully, and, if
there should be need for it, will sur
render his immense popularity in order
to accomplish the desired result.
The time has come when, as he says
in his last message, the government
must assert its rights over the rail
roads in the matter of controlling
rates. This power is negatively as
serted in the present interstate com
merce law, but that is not sufficient.
The time has now come when the
government must decide whether it, or
private interests, are to control the
great avenues of transportation, and
no negative assertion of the federal
right is sufficient to hold the rail
ways in check. There must be affirm
ative assertion.
Bill Will be Epochal.
This affirmative assertion the bill,
which will be known as the admin
istration bill, will make. It will be
epochal in character, and mark the
longest stride forward yet taken by the
government in the interest of the
whole people in rate matters.
The railways resent this invasion of
their long unquestioned privilege. It
means a limitation of their powers,
possibly a reduction of their revenues,
certainly a reduction of their abso
lute power for harm. The presence
of such a law on the statute books
would be sufficient to earn for the
president the hostility of nearly every
railway man of influence in the coun
try. The passage of that bill will at
once strike from the list of las sup
porters nearly every man who is in
terested in railway management or
railway earnings, and there are enough
of such men to affect public sentiment
powerfully.
While the president is thus arraying
the railway power against himself, he
is preparing, by the moderation which
he is exhibiting, so far as other feat
ures of the railway bill are concerned,
to invite the open and bitter opposi
tion of a very large class of the peo
ple generally, of the shipping public,
who, almost without exception, outside
the great cities, are radical in their
demands and will not be satisfied with
any moderate law.
New Town of Roosevelt.
ARLINGTON", Or., Jan. 12—A new
town opposite Arlington on the north
bank railroad has sprung up. T. B
Montgomery has sold many lots in the
townsite. There is one saloon, for
which Peter Johnson paid $1000 license
to Klickitat county; a general mer
chandise and drug store and postoffice.
The town will be called Roosevelt.
A GOOD NIGHT'S RES!
"Speak for It!" she cried to doggie.
For she knew in her little heart,
That German Syrup, home's great treasure.
Could health and joy impart.
The greatest tonic on earth is a good
night's rest. Restless nights and the ter
rible exhaustion of a hacking cough are
dread dangers of the poor consumptive.
But why this fear of the night when a
few doses of Dr. Boschee's German Syrup
will insure refreshing sleep, entirely fret
from cough or night sweat? Free ex
pectoration in the morning is made cer
tain by taking German Syrup.
We linow by the experience of over
thirty-five years that one 75-cent bottle of
German Syrup will speedily relieve 01
cure the worst coughs, colds, bronchial 01
lung troubles—and that, even in bad
cases of consumption, one large bottle of
German Syrup will work wonders. 12
Two sizes, 25c and 75c All druggists.
For Sale By
The Hocket Drug Co.
Subscribe for the Statesman.
Dr.PRICE'S
c Baking Powder
PURE-WHOLESOME-RELIABLE
MADE FROM CREAM OF TARTAR DERIVED
SOLELY FROM GRAPES, THE MOST DELICIOUS AND
WHOLESOME OF ALL FRUIT ACIDS
Its superiority is unquestioned
Its fame world-wide
Its use a protection and a guarantee
against alum food
★ ★★★★★★★★★★★★
Alum baking powders are detrimental to health*
Many consumers use alum baking powders in perfect
ignorance* They are allured to the danger by the cry of cheap
ness, and the false and flippant advertisements in the news
papers* Alum baking powders do not make a "pure,
wholesome and delicious food" any more than two and two
make ten* Their manufacturers are deceiving the public
If you wish to avoid this danger to your food,
LOOK UPON THE LABEL
and decline to buy or use any baking powder that is not
plainly designated as a cream of tartar powder.
The Physical Exercise Fad.
So many of our athletic games and
the incentive to pursue them sedulous
ly are imported from England that It is
somewhat unusual to have the notion
that regular health exercise is neces
sary discredited on the other side of
the water. A in the Loudou
Mail, who has had athletic training and
is a worker, takes issue with those ex
perts who insist that regular exercise
and practice are essential to playing a
good game .or to the maintenance of
health. He says that it is possible to
be fit for a game—and for another
game aftet it—on Saturday afternoon
or any other time without putting in
several hours of exercise to get In trim
and also to keep up unceasingly the
daily stint of work. Of course it all
; depends upon the man or the woman
' whether daily exercise is necessary.
: To quote:
If the individual is below the normal in
: certain respects, then appropriate exer
; cises will be a help. If the individual is
! beyond the normal In certain respects—
' say with a cast Iron biceps and chest of
Imposing size—even then appropriate ex
ercises may be a help; for instance, to
bring the litheness, the quickness and the
repose up to the normal. But if the indi
vidual is near normal, then I do not be
; lieve In the indiscriminate advice to grind
j for some half hour every day. I believe
that there may be a better way—a pleas
i anter and cheaper and more sensible way.
The writer began his experiments as
a well trained athlete. He left off all
exercise except that entailed by his
daily routine of working, dressing,
walking to his business place, etc., and
he found that he could play his game
as well as ever and stay at it as long,
that he could work twelve or thirteen
hours a day without any games, with
out any developers or dumbbells and
without any loss of physical fitness for
games or work. Moreover, he ate and
drank whatever he felt inclined to and
always had a good appetite.
It is presumptuous for one individual
to lay down health rules for all—how
often to bathe, how much water to
drink, how to breathe, and so on—as
this writer declares. Each one must
take his own road to reach a nor
mal condition in respect of his organs,
his nerves and muscles. When that
state is reached it is easy to test the
diet and the amount of exercise needed
to maintain fitness for the usual strain.
In the beginning or until normal health
is established regular physical drill and
practice may be necessary—that is,
simply training for health, Just as diet
ing or medication may be used to build
up powers which are wanting. Beyond
that persistence in practice may not
alone cause a waste of time, but actual
ly prove harmful by using up energy
or by overdeveloping powers that can
not be given healthy activity. A phy
sique too strenuous for its sphere, like
a brain too big for its work. r ~
Keylor Grand
J. B. Catron. Mgr.
One Week, Commencing Monday, January 5, 1906
The Roscian Opera Company
THURSDAY—Amber's, "Chimes of Normandy. M
FRIDAY— "Fra Diavolo."
SATURDAY MATINEE— "The Mikado."
SATURDAY Night—[repeat] "El Capitan."
SUNDAY Night— "The Telephone Girl."
The Scale of Prices will be as Follows:
Entire Lower Floor - - 5 .75*
First Three Rows of Balcony - 1.00.
Next Three " " M .75.
Next Four " " " - .50.
Balance " " " - .35.
Gallery - - - .25.
Seats now on sale for the entire week at the box office
Keylor Grand.
Curtain 8:15. Carriages 10:45.
NEXT ATTRACTION
Tuesday, January 16.
KEYLOR GRAND^mIT 0 " j
The W. T. Carleton Opera Company present the Suprisingly Brilliant
Military Comic Opera <
When Johnnie
Comes Marching Home
By the author of "Dolly Varden." J
A supberb organization of singing artists. A patriotic ]
master piece. A child of genius. Magnificently J
mounted. Costumed with exquisite taste. A unique <
ballet of pretty hoop-skirted lassies :: :: :: 4
PRICES: I
25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00., $1.50. 4
Curtain 8 15. Carriages 11 p. m. *
FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 1906.

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