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The Evening statesman. (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, January 20, 1906, Image 1

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Statesman Advertisers
Get Quick Returns.
VOLUME XXXII.
MAKE USE OF
CONVICT LABOR
United Miners Would Use Them
oi Government [Railroads.
FAVORS TRCT EXCLUSION LAW
They Would Shut Out Japanese
and Korean Laborers Ex
cept Certain Classes.
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind.. Jan. 20.—Th e
United Mine Workers adopted resolu
tions this morning advocating the em.
ployment of convict labor in the con
struction of government transcontinen
tal railroads. They voted to send a
memorial to congress expressing the
belief 'hat the Chinese exclusion act
> so extended as to keep out all Japa
nese and Korean laborers, other than
hose • xempted by the present act.
Costly Fire in Pittsburg.
PITTSBURG, Pa., Jan. 20—Fire de
stroyed the old city hall and market
this morning. The loss is $125,000.
ISHU6AL IN BAD PLIGHT
Found Grovelling in Snow on Dry
Creek This Morning.
HAD LAIN OUT ALL NIGHT IN THE COLD
Brought to County Jail by John Coch
ran—Man Was in a Terrible
Condition.
Grovelling around in a snow bank,
where he had evidently lain all night,
Dan Shugal. a stranger from Pasco,
was found alongside the county road
on Dry creek by John Cochran, a far
mer, this morning and brought to the
county jail. Mr. Cochran, who was on
his way to Walla Walla, was startled
at Beeing a man threshing around in
six inches of snow, apparently unable
to rise, and moaning with the cold.
Cochran went to the man's aid, and,
wrapping him i n an old piece of can-
T as. placed him in the hack and drove
rapidly t 0 town.
At the county jail, after being thaw.
«d "ut, shugal was able to talk a little
«*nd told the officers his name. He
V/iuH K i\e no coherent accwitt, how
ler. «>f how he happened to land in a
bank or how long he had lain
ou; i n the cold. Shugal was In a
wreu-hed condition when brought to
'he jail. He was so cold he could not
up and his clothes were covered
with mud. His hands were grimy and
altogether he was about as wretched
* Piece of humanity as the authorities
"ave come in contact with for some
tif ne. Shugal is about 50 years of age
*nd looksc the typical hobo. In o'««
Pocket was a package of short ribs ax d
in another a bag of crackers, on which
he had evidently been subsisiting.
Mr Cochran said Shugal had rolled
down the snow over an area of prob
ahly io feet square and when found
th e man was holding his face between
ki s hands and rolling back and forth
?v er the ground. He was so thorough
ly chilled that Mr. Cochran had to lift
fl 'rn into the hack by main force.
Shugal lay like a log on the trip to
,0w 'i. his feet hanging out over the
.nd of the hack. It was neces
**T Y for the officers to carry the man
lnt " the jail.
MISSIONARIES BEAT PULLMAN GIANTS
W °N BASKETBALL GAME LAST
NIGHT BY CLOSE SCORE
OF 12 TO 11.
After 40 strenuous minutes in Whit
en gymnasium last night the Mis
•ionaries won the first intercollegiate
J* m e of the season, besting the ladr
The Evening statesman
shows, the game was very close.
Toward the last few minutes the
anxious crowd of students on the side,
lines almost held their breath waiting
for Whitman to make the one goal
which would mean victory. The game
was what was called a tie; at the end
of the allotted time the score stood
10 to 10 and by the rules the victory
went to the school first making two
points. Pullman made a point on a
foul and then began the fiercest play
ing of the evening for one more point,
for one more goal meant victory. The
ball fairly flew around the room as the
husky players of each side squirmed,
twisted and fought after it. The main
fight was about the farmers' goal and
when by a lucky turn Laughridge
dropped the leather sphere in the W.
b. C. goal the audience fairly went
wild with delight.
It was a fast game all through, prob
ably the fastest seen In Walla Walla.
The playing was consequently pretty
rough and many and many a time a
player got laid out on the hard floor,
but was up and doing before time was
out. Cox had the hardest luck and |
showed great pluck in returning to
the game after every mishap.
Bassett played a magnificent game j
as guard and one time trotted clear j
across the field to drop one in the op
ponent's basket. Job Rigsby was there
with the goods all the time and Cox
did fine work in the center of the field,
although not up to his standard in goal j
throwing.
Fulton, forward, was easily the j
brightest star for W. S. C, with Ma- I
loney, the captain-center, a good !
second.
Puget Sound Coming.
Manager Rigsby, of the Whitman
college basketball team, received word
this morning from Snohomish that the
Puget Sound academy team would be
here on January 29. This is the best
secondary team in the state of Wash
ington and will make Whitman hustle
some, according to best opinion. At
tempt will be made to have a game
between the girls of Whitman college
and the girls of the Walla Walla high
school as a preliminary to the main
game on that evening. The girls of
both institutions have fast teams.
Riot Among Guests at Weding.
DULUTH, Minn., Jan. 20.—A riot
call summoned the Hibing police to
the Utica mine location, where they
found that a desperate fight between
the three Austrian factions there had
resulted in the probable fatal stabbing
of Toney Bertoglatti, who is now fn a
hospital with eleven deep wounds.
Eleven arrests have been made, all of
the prisoners Austrlans.
Angello Jeansetti and Mary Berdo
were married last night at the mine
location, and one faction was repre
sented among .the guests and the other
two were not. The two latter attended
later and the riot followed.
Several shots were fired and several
people were slightly injured.
District Attorney Fined for Contempt.
DENVER. Col., Jan. 20.—District At.
torney Stidger was fined $500 for con
tempt of court today by Judge John
son and was ordered to jail until the
fine is paid. The judge accused the
attorney of complicity with gamblers
in removing their cases from his court
and in permitting their release on a
technicality.
THE IDAHO UNIVERSITY WITHDRAWS
WILL NOT TAKE PART IN ORA
TORICAL CONTEST WITH
WHITMAN COLLEGE.
Only two colleges. Washington State
college and Whitman college, will take
part in the intercollegiate oratorical
contest held here next April. Idaho
State university council notified Whit
man today that she had withdrawn be
cause of carrying too many debates
and having to take part in oratorical
contests with Washington university
and University of Oregon. Montana
the other college in the league, was
unable to stand the expense of holding
the contest at Missoula, so dropped
from the league this year. Calvin
Thomason, '07. will be Whitman's ora
tor in this contest.
Lieutenant Houston Sentenced.
WASHINGTON, D. C Jan. 20.—1t is
announced that the courtmartial found
Lieutenant Houston guilty of ineffici
ency and sentenced him to be repri
manded by Admiral Evans. Houston
commanded the destroyer Worden in
the collision with the destroyer Law
rence.
Flood Damage in California.
SANTA CRUZ, Cal., Jan. 20.—The
broad gauge railroad was unable to get
out any train until noon on account of
two miles of track being under water
at Laguna. Passengers on trains were
transferred by handcars to freight and
passenger trains on each side of the
WALLA WALLA, WASHINGTON. SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1906.
ASPHALT AGENT ARRESTED
Fred T. Sherman Charged With
Bribing Tacoma's Mayor.
IS OUTCOME OF FIGHT AGAINST GRAFT
Mayor George P. Wright Said to Have
Been Paid Six Thousand Dol
lars for Contract.
TACOMA, Wash., Jan. 20—Fred T.
Sherman, agent of the Independent As
phalt company, was arrested this af
ternoon on a warrant charging him
with giving a bribe of $6,000 to Mayor
George P. Wright, of Tacoma. The
arrest has caused a sensation. It comes
as the outcome of a long fight against
graft in connection with street paving.
Sherman has until recently been agent
for the Barber Asphalt company and
is widely known throughout the Pa
cific northwest.
Army Surgeons' Needs.
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 20 —A
committee representing the American
Medical association and consisting of
Dr. C. A. L. Reed, of Cincinnati, Dr.
William L.. Rodman, of Philadelphia,
and Dr. William H. Welch, of Johns
Hopkins, is in this city at present in
the interest of pure food legislation
and for the purpose of appearing be
fore the house military committee in
behalf of the bill to nicrease the med
ical department of the army. It will
be urged that the latter measure is of
prime importance in maintaining the
efficiency of the militant force of this
country. It will be shown in the hear,
ing before the committee that there is
great need of adding to the commis
sioned personnel of the medical corps
and of placing it on a firm foundation
and under such conditions as will at
tract to the corps the graduate's of the
medical schools who are not now in
clined to enter the medical depart
ment, since, promotion is bound to be
slow.
CHINESE FETE BEGINS SUNDAY
NEW YEAR CELEBRATION WILL
BE COMMENCED SUNDAY
HOLIDAYS NEXT WEEK.
Walla Wala Chinese will begin the
celebration of the Chinese New Year
on Sunday. The celebration will con
tinue until Tuesday, or New Year's
day, when the Chinese stores will be
ESTABLISHED 1861
Miss Zona Corn, Queen of the Frs/.ernal Carnival, and her Maids of Honor.
changed and in the evening there will
be a series of banquets and dinners
given by prominent members of the
colony to their immediate friends. It
will be a day when care is thrown to
the winds and the Chinese parties that
take dinner in the stores will visit the
restaurants in the colony and follow as
nearly as possible the customs of the
empire.
New Year's day will mark the be
ginning of the 32d year of the reign of
the present emperor and will be cele
brated on that account as well as be
cause of its marking a new period.
Track-Walker Saves a Train.
SALT LAKE, Utah, Jan. 20.—After
fighting his way through snow drifts a
track-walker in Beaver canyon suc
ceeded in stopping Oregon Short Line
train No. 8, the Butte express, in the
nick of time to save it from plunging
into a slide of trees and rocks. The
worst blizzard experienced here in
years, accompanied by vivid lightning,
prevailed today. Lightning struck the
powerhouse here and probably fatally
burned Thomas Close, the electrical
engineer.
PRESIDENT TAKES A HAND
Publishes an Important Letter Bear
ing on Panama Affairs.
VINDICATES THE AMERICAN EN6INEERS
Representative of Mackay Engineering
Company Is Ready to Testify
for the Administration.
WASHINGTON, D. C. Jan. 20.—Th e
president today made public a letter
fom W. H. Mackay, president of the
Mackay Engineering company of New
York, in which Mackay says his repre
sentative on the isthmus is willing to
come home and testify to the falsity of
reports of mismanagement by govern
ment engineers.
American Delegates to The Hague.
WASHINGTON. D. C Jan. 20.—1t is
announced that the American delegates
to The Hague will be Joseph H. Choate
and General Horace Porter. Judge
Rose, of Little Rock. Ark., may be ap
pointed If Russia sends a larger dele
gation.
Chinese Commissioners in Chicago.
CHICAGO, 111., Jan. 20—The Chinese
commissioners visited the stockyards
this morning and the MeCormick har
vester works this afternoon. They will
be given a banquet tonight.
GUAYAQUIL, Jan. 20.—1t Is rumor
ed that General Eloy Alfaro, former
president of Ecuador and leader of the
rveolution against Garcia, has occu-
Revolution in Ecuador.
PHILIPPINE RAILWAY BIDS
Two {Were Opened By Secretary
Of War Root Today.
BOTH BIOS ARE CONSIDERED 600 D
Both Ask for Government Guarantee
on 95 Per Cent of Investment
for Thirty Years.
WASHINGTON, D. C , aJn. 20.—Two
bids were received and opened this
morning for the construction of the
Philippine railways. New Yorkers, as
sociated with the International Bank
ing corporation, offered to bluild lines
in Panay, Negros and Cebu. with the
gorevrnment's guarantee of 4 per cent
interest on 95 per cent of the total cost
fro 30 years, 100 miles to be construct
ed each year until, completed, j. G.
White & Co. to be constructors. Spey
er & Co., of New York, offered to build
390 miles in Luzon and take over the
existing Manila Dagupan road with
out a government guarantee or inter
est and build the Dagupan-Laoag line,
168 miles long, with a government
guarantee of 4 per cent on 95 per cent
of the total cost for 30 years.
Moved by Acting.
NEW YORK, N. Y., Jan. 20—Moved
by a passage in a play, where a burg
ler caught in the act tells a clergyman
that the whole world is against a crim
inal who tries to reform, a young man
who gave his name as Albert Emerson
arose from an orchestra seat in the
Garden theater last night and before
the audience proclaimed himself an
expert safebreaker and robber and de
clared his experience proved the words
of the stage character. His interrup
tion, made in tones loud enough to be
heard throughout the theater, stopped
the action of the play. He was ar
rested and at the police station his
statement and record were verified.
Emerson has served sereval terms in
prison.
The Chicago Grain Market.
CHICAGO. 111.. Jan 20.—Wheat, 88%
l ?fS7%c; corn, 45%@45Vic; oats, [email protected]
32VbC
CLOSING OF AUTOMOBILE SHOW
TWO EXPOSITIONS HELD IN NEW
YORK WERE LARGELY
ATTENDED.
NEW YORK. N. Y., Jan. 20.—The
automobile show at Madison Square
Garden and the one in the Sixty-ninth
Regiment Armory on Lexington ave
nue and Twenty-sixth street, wil close
tonight after one week of extraordin-
the two simultaneous expositions of
the past week. The feature which
probably attracted more interest even
than the automobile display was the
exhibition of apparttus, machinery,
etc., for navigating the air, under the
auspices of the Aero Club of America.
Many prominent automobilists are tak
ing a great deal of interest in aerial
navigation and it is expected that this
exhibition will give a powerful im
petus to the development of this kind
of sport in the United States. Hereto
fore France has practically monopo
lized the field, while the United States
has been interested in the problem
more from a scientific standpoint.
The exhibition will end this evening
with the annual banquet of the Auto
mobile Club of America, which will be
held at the Waldorf-Astoria. Among
the prominent visitors who will be the
guests of the club at the banquet will
be Count dp !a Vaulx. the noted French
aeronaut, who came to this country for
the purpose of seeing the exhibitions
of automobiles and airships.
SALOONKEEPERS ARE HUFFY.
Port Townsend Liquor Dealers Hand
Councilmen a Hot Bunch.
PORT TOWNSEND, Jan. 20.—Local
saloon men are incensed at the recent
action of the city council in raising the
liquor license from $300 to $50). A
leading member of the Liquor Dealers'
association has announced that a peti
tion .will be prepared for circulation
among the business men making a re
duction in the old rate. The council
men are being urged by others to stand
pat, and lively times are in prospect
for the next meeting of the council
February 8.
MOORE AND RUST.
They Are Decided Upon By the Fusion
Forces.
SEATTLE, Wash., Jan. 20.—Last
night the labor union leaders and the
municipal leaguers united upon Wil
iiam Hickman Moore for mayor and
Frank Rust for city treasurer. Moore
is a democrat and was a member of
the state senate when the big fight was
made against the Clancy-Piper ring.
In populist days he was elected to the
superior bench and won great favor
among laboring men by a decision in
their favor during the Issaquah coal
strike. Lately he has been close to the
Seattle Electric company.
The labor union leaders wanted Mat
thew Dow for mayor and until yester
day he declared he would run. But a
letter from him last evening withdrew
his name. This is said to be the result
of a story widely circulated to the
effect that he had been mixed in a
scandal in Texas.
Montana Timber Thieves Fined.
HELENA, Mont., Jan. 20—Judge
Hunt, of the federal court, today fined
Messrs. Burke, Mcßride, Lassen and
Ahlm $200 in the first two instances
and $150 in the latter two. They were
charged with cutting timber on gov
ernment lands. Homer H. Case, of
Missoula, indcted on a similar charge,
was ordered to plead next Monday.
The Duke Divorce Suit.
TRENT, N. J., Jan. 20.—The answer
of Mrs. Lillian M. Duke to the divorce
proceedings begun by James B. Duke,
was filed this morning, She denies the
charges of wrong doing and alleges in
fidelity on the part of Duke She
charges cruelty, desertion and malici
ous slander.
LINEB RESCUED SCHOONER'S CREW
MAINE CAME IN SIGHT OF KIP
LING JUST IN TIME TO SAVE
CREW FROM PERISHING.
NEW YORK, N. Y., Jan. 20.—The
liner Maine was brought here today on
account of the rescue at sea of the
captain and the crew of the schooner
Kipling, January 11. The Kipling left
Liverpool for Newfoundland for a
cargo of fish. She tried to put back
when the storm broke, but the little
vessel was unable to withstand the
heavy seas. The Maine appeared. The
first boat put off was crushed, all the
Kipling's crew going into the sea. They
held to wreckage until the second boat
appeared. The Kipling spent 20 days
in a crippled condition at sea before
the rescue.
Doings in Russia.
ST. PETERSBURG, Jan. 20.—The
rebels control Batoum, Guria and Poti
meretia. The government is sending
troops and warships. Sailors are re
placed with soldiers, the seamen being
untrustworthy. Linevitch is coming to
discuss the advisability of keeping the
army in Manchuria until next year.
Paul Berryman Won.
A large crowd attended the Demorest
medal contest last night at the Walla
Walla high school. There were con
testants from Pearsons aeauemy, the
high school and the Empire Business
college. Paul Berryman was declared
the winner. He represented the busi
ness college.
Deficiency Bill Considered.
You Get Today's News
Today in The Statesman.
GAYNOR AND
GREENE CASE
Government Attorney Severely Ar
raigns the Defendants.
THEY MADE TOOL OF CARTER
Puffed Up Army Officer Until
He Thought He Was Great
est Man on Earth.
SAVANNAH. Ga., Jan. 20.—The gov.
ernment attorneys outlined the case of
he government in the Green-Gaynor
case before the jury this morning.
Tiiey said that Green and Gaynor puf
fed up Captain Carter, a young officer
fresh from West Point, until he be
lieved he was equaled in ability by no
one in the country. He listened to
their schemes and borrowed their mon
ey until he was owned by them body and
soul. The two secured an enormous
appropriation for Savannah harbor
'hat they might have bigger sums
from which to pilfer. They were able
to do so by the aid of their tool. Car
ter, and they got the contract by Car
ter's unfair aid.
SEEKS SAFETY IN ALASKA
Mother Charged With Robbing Her
Own Children.
SHE IS CHARGED WITH GRAND LARCENY
American Bonding Company la Seeking
Mrs. E. H. Roe of Missoula,
Montana.
MISSOULA, Mont., Jan. 20.—Failing
to perform the sacred trust imposed
upon her in the handling of $2.0»0 as
guardian of her four minor children,
and with a charge of grand larceny
preferred against her by the American
Bonding company of Baltimore, Mrs.
E. J. Roe of Missoula, in company with
a man named Smith Higgins, has ab
sconded and is now traveling in the
direction of Alaska. Aside from the
charge of grand larceny, the woman Is
liable under the criminal law for ab
sconding and for contempt of court-
The officers of Missoula county are
hot upon the woman's trail and it is
confidently believed she will be under
arrest in a few days. She is aboard
the ship Farallon, sailing between Se
attle and Alaska, and at the next port
the steamer touches she will find a
warrant waiting for her.
The woman left here about three
days ago in company with Higgins and
three of the children and went Im
mediately to Seattle. Officers of that
city were notified to arrest her. Yes
terday a telegram was received from
there stating that Smith and Mrs. Roe
sailed from Seattle Sunday on the
steamer Farallon for Valdez, Alaska.
The first port the steamer will touch
will be Juneau. Information has been
wired to the United States marshal t<>
take the two Into custody at that point,
and extradition papers will be sent
there at once.
Chicago to Have Vigilance Committee.
CHICAGO, 111., Jan. 20—Citizens met
this afternoon to formulate plans for a
vigilance committee in Chicago to sup
press crime.
BIG ELEVATOR RESUMES WORK
LARGE ESTABLISHMENT AT EL
WOOD, KANS., IS REOPENED
FOR B-oINESS.
ST. JOSEPH. Mo., Jan. 20,—The b»g
Harroun grain elevator at Elwood.
Kan., on the other side of the ffcrpr.
was reopened for business today. It
is operated by William Nash, of Chi
cago, and W. H. Ferguson, of Lincoln,
XpK. two of the leading grain m«M .
NUMBER 210

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