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The Evening statesman. [volume] (Walla Walla, Wash.) 1903-1910, August 08, 1907, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085421/1907-08-08/ed-1/seq-1/

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"WALLA WALLA'S PENNY PAPER
CRUISER FLEET TO MOBILIZE
ON PACIFIC COAST AT ONCE
Almost Entire Strength of Asiatic Squadron
Under Admiral Dayton Will Defend
Against the Japs
WASHINGTON, Aug. B.—Accord
ing to the guard the administration
plans the mobilization in the Pacific
■of a powerful cruiser fleet to begin at
once. Orders have been issued for al
most the entire cruiser strength of the
Asiatic squadron to be brought across
to the Pacific. This new Pacific fleet
will be under Rear Admiral Dayton,
who leaves Manila shortly with four
of the heavy armed cruisers. Navy of
ficers say the mobilization is for the
purpose of defending the Pacific coast
should Japan resent the movements of
nfoj.'.ral Evan's fleet. The mobiliza-
of tn Dayton fleet is expected to
l a possible enemy from sailing
the Pacific. At no time will
be too far from the Atlantic t|o
jJEash back should a hostile fleet come
ml rom the far east through the Suez
LW canal. It is planned to bring
MUCH INTEREST
IN STATE El
NEW PAVILION IS BEING ERECTED
AND LAWNS AND GARDENS
BUILT AT YAKIMA.
XoRTH YAKIMA, ug\ B.—The state
fair grounds afford a scene of great ac
tivity just'now'. A magnificent new pa
vilion is being erected with the money
appropriated by the last legislature,
the lawns are undergoing cultivation
with 'he added feature of beautiful
flower gardens planted in conspicuous
locations on the grounds, while the
race track is receiving the attention of
Superintendent John Lacey and a
gai.g el' workmen
'I'll., people of the Yakima valley are
taking a greater interest in the state
fair this year than ever before in the
history of the association. While the
prosperous conditions of the valley
may he the direct result of this unus
ual activity, much credit is due to
the fair commission and the efforts
put forth by its members to make the
1907 state fair one that will redound
to the greatness of this state.
Secretary G. A. Graham is daily be
sieged with communications from
counties all over the state in which
applications arc enclosed for space in
the buildings. Some one has some
thing they wish to exhibit at the fair.
Arrangements have been completed
with nearly every county in the state
for a display of its agricultural, mine
ral and manufacturing products.
The display of fruit this year will
be the wonder of the thousands who
will visit the fair. It appears as
though a conspiracy has been entered
Into by several of the leading fruit sec
tions of the state outside Yakima
county, in an effort to win from Ya
kima county the reputation it now
enjoys of being the greatest fruit pro
ducing section in the west. Chelan and
Spokane counties are- particularly de
sirous of robbing Yakima county of
her boasted fruit prestige.
When the fact is considered that the
total cash prizes offered this year for
fruit and vegetables amounts to $2700,
and that added to these cash prizes
are more than $1000 in valuable pre
miums, it is not surprising that the
fruit and vegetable growers of the
state are wide awake to the opportu
nities awaiting them.
Probably the most attrac'ive feat
ure, however, to a majority of the
visitors will be the magnificent racing
program prepared by the commission.
At the present time there are 30 thor
oughbreds being trained on the local
track for entry in the state fair
races. The purses offered are attrac
tive to horsemen, and the North Ya
kima track is considered by turfmen
to be the fastest in the northwest. It
is a mile track and is rapidly being
prepared for the big meet of Septem
ber the 23rd to 2Sth. fair week. Guy
Mecklem broke the world's record on
this track with his 850-pound automo
bile at a public exhibition held here
July 28. He made the circuit in one
minute and one second. Previous rec
ord for these machines on a circular
track was 1:05. It is on the North
Yakima track that a number of har
ness and running records have been
established, and none of them have
been lowered in the past three years.
-'Jorth Yakima is making unusual
preparations to receive the big crowds
THE EVENING STATESMAN
together off the coast of California
by the end of December, four divi
sions, each representing an aggregate
of 159.336 tons.
All of Dayton's fleet will be com
posed of, first squadron, West Virgin
ia, Colorado, Maryland, Pennsylvania
all eighteen guns; second divi
sion: Tennessee, Washington, with 20
guns, California, South Dakota, with
18 guns. Third division, St. Louis,
Charleston, Milwaukee, with 14 guns,
and the Chicago—lß ships in all. In the
first squadron the vessels are in the
13,080 tons class. If Japan strikes a
sudden blow, the Philippines and other
Pacific insular possessions will be
left at Japan's mercy so far as the
navy is concerned. The present force
in the far east is insufficient to cope
with the enemy. Any attempt to
strengthen that force would be re
sented by Japan as an unfriendly act.
fair week. In the last year new ho
tels and lodging houses have been
built at a cost of $200,000, and t?ve
problem of taking care of the crowds
will not be a difficult one to solve. It is
estimated that at least 2500 more
people can be accommodated this year
than could have been a year ago.
PEACH DAY FOR FREEWATER.
Prominer'i Men of Northwest Will
Help With Celebration.
At a meeting of the Freewater Com
mercial club last night L. D. Mitchell
was chosen secretary pro tern. Much
progress was reported by D. C. Sand
erson, chairman of the committee on
arrangements for peach day, who said
he had received assurance of the fol
lowing that they would be present at
the Peach Day celebration: United
States Senator C. W. Fulton, of As
toria, Oregon; Congressman Ellis of
Pendleton: General Passenger Agent
William McMurray; J. M. Scott, assist
ant general passenger agent of the O.
R. & N. company: Attorneys Garrecht
and Barker of Walla Walla, Wash.:
Secretary H. C. Willis, of the Third
(>regon Development League: officials
of the Walla Walla Valley Traction
company and Walla Walla Commercial
club.
KILL TRIBES TO SAVE SOULS
GOVERNMENT WILL STOP SAV
AGE PRACTICES OF INDIANS
IN CANADA.
WINNIPEG. Aug. B—The two Cree
! chiefs are being tried today for
the murder of one of their daughters
in-law, with all the tribal formality
in the presence of several hundred In
dians. They are accused of murder
ing 20 Itnfians. The government is
determined to stop the savage tradi
tion that all members of the tribes
I who are stricken with de lirium in fever
or possessed of an evil spirit, must
be killed at once or their soul will be
. lost.
++++++++ * + + + + + ❖
♦ Kellough Has Sensation. ♦
+ WASHINGTON. Aug. B.—A +
♦ sensational confidential report of ♦
♦ Attorney Kellogg who investigat- ♦
♦ Ed the oil trust management of +
♦ the government suits for the dis- ♦
♦ solution of the Standard Oil is in ♦
♦ the department of justice awaiting ♦
♦ Secretary Bonaparte. ♦
*.}. + + + + + + + + + + * + + +
Williams Is the Choice.
JACKSON. Mill. Aug B.—The dem
ocratic state committee today de
clared Williams as the party nominee
for state senator. Williams had a
majority of 648. There was no con
test
Direct Primary Valid.
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. S—The
supreme court has handed down a
decision sustaining the validity of the
primary election law passed by the
last legislature by which a voter is
obliged to announce his political affil
iation on registering.
U. P. Declares Dividend.
NEW YORK. Aug. B.—The Union
Pacific today declared a' regular quar
terly dividend of 2 1-2 per cent on
common and a regular semi-annual
divident of 2 per cent on preferred
stock.
VOLUME XXXVI.
STRIKE OF 70,000
LOUISVILLE, Aug B,—A vote •
on whether the tobacco workers •
all over the country will strike ■
against the American Tobacco •
company is being received tocfay •
at the headquarters of the Inter- •
national Tobacco Workers union. •
Should the American Federation •
of Labor decide to assist the to- «i
bacco workers the strike of allied i
trades would effect 70,000. i
WELLS EXHUMES
BODY OF BARNES
COLORADO GENERAL FINDS RE
MAINS IN PLACE DESCRIBED
BY STEVE ADAMS.
TELLURIDE, Colo., Aug. B.—The
I body of W. J. Barney, a timber man
| employed as a smuggler in the union
i mine, who dissappeared June 19, 1906,
was exhumed near the Alta mill yes
j terday and brought here today by gen
| ecal Wells. Steve Adams told where
i the body was buried. Barney, it is
said, incurred the enmity of the union
lof working men at the mine after the
} strike in 1901. Adams says Barney's
body was stripped of all clothing be
fore interment.
THE NEW JERUSALEM.
MEXICO CITY, Aug. B.—Philip
Shabin, Abraham O. Desiatoff and
Efin A. Urin, of Los Angeles, are
here negotiating for 10,000 acres
of land for a Jewish colony of a
hundred and fifty thousand. Two
thousand will come from Califor
nia, the rest from Russia.
PERSIANS KILL WHEAT KING
MERCHANT REFUSES TO SELL TO
STARVING PEOPLE—TERRIBLE
VENGEANCE REAPED.
CHICAGO, Aug. B.—Mrs. Loretta
Vanhock, Chicago missionary in Ta
briz, Persia, says in a letter to head
quarters that the merchant who re
fused to sell two mill.on pounds of
wheat to the starving people, was
dragged from his home along the
streets by mobs, who beat and stabbed
him. While he was still alive they cut
off his ears and nose and hung his
body to a post in the street. His fam
ily gave a mililon pounds of wheat
to recover the body.
FARMERS COME TO TOWN.
Rain Causes a Holiday But No Dam
age Is Expected,
Owing to the rain which made it
necessary to stop work with the com
bines, a large number of farmers and
harvest hands are in the city today.
Little fear that the rain will do any
damage is expressed, however, the ma
jority of them are looking for it to
clear away within the next 12 hours
and the predictions of the weather man
are for fair weather.
Women In Upper House.
WELLINGTON, New Zealand. Aug.
8. —The bill making women eligible
to election to the upper house passed
the committee stage today.
PLEASANT VIEW FARMERS SHIP FROM PLATFORMS
Some of the farmers around Pleasant
View have at last solved the warehouse
problem.
R. J. Thompkins, Ben Holt, J. E.
Painter and Charles Pearson have
joined forces and built a platform on
the spur from Eureka Junction and
are loading from it at much less cost
than they have loaded wheat in a long
time.
WILL USE PRIVATE WAREHOUSES AT EUREKA
"Private warehouse owners on Eu
reka flat have agreed among them
selves to allow farmers of that local
ity to use their warehouses for load
ing wheat at practically cost," an
nounced John Hoffman, one of the
most extensive wheat raisers of Eu
reka Flat, today.
"The exact charge which will be
made." said Mr. Hoffman, "has not
been decided upon, but it will be be
tween 10 and 15 cents per ton. By
stacking "their wheat in the field and
covering it well with straw. Eureka
flat farmers will be able to evade the
excessive charges imposed by the,
ESTABLISHED
WALLA WALLLA, WASHINGTON, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1907.
NEW SERVICE
BEGAN TODAY
NO MORE CHANGES AT PASCO
AND DIRECT CONNECTIONS
MADE FOR THE SOUND.
Following the promise of General
Manager Nutt to give better service
on the present train from here to Pas
co, a modern day coach was put in
I commission this morning and will be
! continued in service between Pasco
I and this city. The new sleeper will
[be put on as soon as it can be brought
j out, which will probably be about a
| week or 10 days, according to a state
) merit made by Manager Nutt last
I night.
The new day coach is a large, com
fortable, well equipped and up-to-date
coach. It seats 68 passengers and is
much wider than the antiquated coach
heretofore used on this branch.
The new sleeper which is to supplant
the time honored "Coppei" will be or
the latest pattern standard Pullman
sleeping coach and it will not only run
to Pasco and make direct connec
tions with the train there for Seattle
and Tacoma, but will be a through
car to Spokane, thus doing away with
the changing of cars for that place
and the long wait in the depot at Pas
co.
MORE FIGHTING
AT GASA BLANCA
JEWISH SECTION IS SACKED AND
MANY MASSACRED —EUROPE-
ANS SAFE BUT FEAR ATTACK
TANGIER, Aug. B.—Two thousand
additional men were landed at Casa
Blanca today and the street fighting
continues. The Jewish section of Casa
Blanca has been * sacked, many were
massacred and the streets are filled
with bodies. Shells from the warships
set fire to and destroyed the Moorish
quarter. Great distress is prevailing
among the poor owing to the closed
stores. All Europeans are safe. It
is feared Jerras tribesmen near Tan
gier may attack the city.
•j. tjt »|» «ji »ji ■!•
+ Operators Strike. ♦
* LOS ANGELES, Aug. B.—The *
•> Western Union operators struck ♦
4" last night and there ar e only six ♦
4* operators at work this morning. ♦
♦ It is charged there was discrlm- 4»
<• ination against union men. Bugi- 4»
+ ness is accepted subject to delay. +
FUEL FAMINE NEXT WINTER
PEOPLE ADVISED BY INTERSTATE
COMMISSION TO BUY COAL
AND WOOD NOW.
WASHINGTON. Aug. B.—The In
terstate Commerce commission today
issued a warning to the people of the
Northwest to prepare for another fuel
famine next winter by buying coal ana
wood at once. Coal is expected to go
to $25 per ton in Montana.
These farmers stack their grain in
the fields and haul it as they wish to
ship. It costs less than 50 cents per
ton to handle wheat in this manner
and in cases where the farmers wish
to ship early in the season, the lack
of warehouse facilities is not felt.
Mr. Thompkins says he and the other
farmers who built the platform are
anxious to have the farmers of that
[warehouse men. This will protect the
wheat from the elements and the
farmers can haul as they wish to
! ship and use the private houses for
• loading purposes.
I "The small charge which will he
i Imposed will give the farmers use of
the scales and trucks and allow them
to truck their wheat into the car.
Owing to the lack of sufficient ware
houses, this will not entirely remedy
the situation, but will relieve it to a
great extent as there are about 11
warehouses on the flat."
In regard to the present rain, Mr.
1861
++++++++ + + + + + + +
!♦ ♦
+ Standard Oil Company Appeals. +
♦ CHICAGO. Aug. B.—The Stand- +
+ ard Oil attorneys today filed a for- ♦
♦ mal notice of appeal from Judge ♦
♦ Landis" decision, fining the trust. ♦
♦ Indictments are being drawn by ♦
+ government experts against the ♦
♦ railroads alleged to have granted ♦
♦ rebates and concessions to the ♦
+ Standard. +
++++++++ + + + + + + J
MDYER WANTS
TO KEEP DARROW
IS IN DENVER TO CONSULT IN
REGARD TO ATTORNEY FOR
DEFENSE IN COMING TRIAL
DENVER, Aug B.—Mover will prob
ably decide tonight on which attorney
he wants to defend him. He is con
ferring with Darrow today, and if the
matter is left to him entirely, Darrow
will be selected.
++++++++++++++++
♦ Will Please Farmers. +
♦ "Fair tonight and Friday," says ♦
♦ the weather man. ♦
++++++++ + + + + + + + +
MAY NOT BE EXECUTED.
Baron Yon Lindenau Makes Charges
Against Olga Moliter.
BERLIN, Aug. B.—On the strength
of a statement made by Baron yon
Lindenau, now under arrest, that Ol
ga Moliter and not Carl Hau under
sentence to be beheaded, killed her
mother. Olga has beer, arrested at
Baden Baden. The baron makes the
charge in a letter to the prosecutor at
Carlsruhe.
BOATS MEET f iN WILLIAMETTE
ON TRIP TO GET PASSENGER OF
COLUMBIA, CITY OF PANAMA
IS WRECKED.
PORTLAND, Aug. B.—While mak
ing her initial trip to this port to take
aboard the survivors of the Columbia
on the run between Portland and San
Francisco, the steamer, City of Pana
ma, rammed the steamer, Alliance,
stoving a large hole in the latter's
stern. The collision occurred at the
mouth of the Willamette at 5 o'clock
this morning, where the Alliance has
gone ashore on the sand bar.
NEW SHOP FOR Y. M. C. A.
Barber Will Take Charge When Build
ing is Opened Sept. 1.
Joseph Hull of the O. K. Barber
shop will have charge of the shop in
the Y. M. C. A. building when the
opening is made about' the first of
September.
The barber shop will be up-to-date
and thoroughly modern in every ro
spect. The room allotted for this pur
pose is in the southeast corner of the
building and opens upon Spokane
street as well as having an entrance
through the interior.
neighborhood use it and will grant its
use free of charge in preference to
seeing the warehouse companies patro
nized.
Mr. Thompkins says he has been
making an effort for several months
'to get permission from the railroad
company to build a warehouse on its
rightofway, but so far has been un
successful.
Hoffman said he thought it would
have little effect on the crops, none
whatever o n the wheat harvested and
in sacks. If rain falls in any quanti'y,
however, he says the uncut blue stem
will be in danger, as its stalks are
light while the heads are full and
heavy and it would not take a great
deal of rain to cause the grain to fall
down so that it could not be harvest
ed. Club wheat and other varieties,
he says are not in dangt r from this
source. He believes, however, the
rain will not continue long enough
to do any damage.
NUMBER 344.
BETTER SERVICE TO DAYTON
RESULT OF OFFICIAL VISIT
Commercial Club Committee Will Confer
With Dayton in Regard to Proposi
tion of Manager Nutt
Although nothing could be done by
the Northern Pacific officials wi'h he
gard to giving Walla Walla a M%
train to Pasco, it is hoped that the
visit of the officials here may result
in a betterment of the service be
tween this place and Dayton.
Heretofore the train for Dayton has
departed about an hour after the ar
rival of the train from Pasco. It is the
plan of the Commercial club to have
this train leave here in the evening
and return from Dayton in the morn
ing, thus giving Dayton, Waitsburg
and way stations a better service into
this city.
Speaking of the proposed change,
Ben Holt, chairman of transportation
committee of the Commercial club
said this morning:
"We don't see why Dayton should
object to the proposed change. She
has three trains out of the city and
none of these leave in the morning.
One leaves about noon and the other
two in the afternoon. It would be a
much better service for her to have
one train leaving early in the morning,
another about noon and the other later
in the afternoon. This would give
Dayton the best possible service.
"Dayton's only objection would be
that through passengers for the Sound
would come down in the morning and
have to lay over until evening to get
the train out. While this is true, still
there are a great many people going
to the coast who would gladly avail
themselves of the privilege of staying
over a day in this city. If it were
really urgent that the connections be
direct, the passenger could take the af
ternoon train over the O. R. & N. and
make the connections just the same.
WILL WED IN WISCONSIN.
Originator of Sophomore Play at Whit
man to be Married Soon.
Invitations are out for the wedding
of Miss Edith Blackman Merrell and
Mr. William Reese Davis. The wed
ding will take place at the home of
Miss Merrell's parents in Ripon, Wis.,
August 22.
Miss Merrell is well known in sn
| ciety and college circles of this city,
i She was formerly head of the depart
iment of public speaking ar.d professor
|in the Greek department of Whitman
college, as well as being dean of
women in that institution. Miss Mer
rell also was well known as a trainer
of amateur theatricals, it being under
her direction that the sophomore play,
now one of the most popular features
of commencement week, originated at
Whitman college.
MUCH INTEREST IN CARNIVAL
BIG MEETING OF COMMERCIAL
CLUB TONIGHT TO DIS
CUSS PLANS.
Snuggestions for the name for the
amusement street during the street
carnival continue to come in. Many
and varied are the suggestions and
undoubtedly the name w ill be a winner
when finally picked out.
| The new ones are, "The Highway,"
"The Divide," "Sheridan's Ride,"
j "Whitman's Path," "The White Way,"
I "Best Yet," "Ten Strike," "Walla Wal
jla Lane," "The Front," "The Skirmish
! Line," "Thoroughfare," "Ant Hill,"
| "Blunestem Lane," "Fairy Bower,"
! "Beauty Path," "Bowery"; while from
j Dayton come the following, "The Hub,"
"The Jungle, "The Maze," "The Path
way," "Amusement Street," "The Hum
i mer," "Away Down Yonder," "Walla
Walla Boosters." Main Thing," Fairy
land." "Cultus Street." "Potlatch
I Street," "Clatawa Nanich." These are
all to be taken under consideration
and the one best suited to the street
will be picked for use.
A big meeting of the Commercial
club will be held tonight to further
the plans for the harvest festival.
! Everything is running smoothly and
j one of the biggest events of the kind is
j assured to Walla Walla.
! The vote for queen stands as fol-
I lows:
Frances Griffin 323
Amie Pellisier 18"
Zona Corn 49
Olive Voth 15
Lucile Fisher 11
25 CENTS PER MONTH
"As it is, there is no way fojr Day
ton and Waitsburg to
Walla Walla without; staying over
night. All three have the same
schedule, none fafnish opportunity to
come to this city and return the same
day.
"This is a great inconvenience.
, Waitsburg wanted to withdraw from
j Walla Walla county not many years
I ago for that very reason. They
I couldn't come to their coun'y seat
; without staying over night, however
| trivial their business might be. Kor
I this reason they wanted to go to Day
ton where they had thre e trains a day
in the right direction at the right time.
! "As for the layovers caused by the
! reversal of the present schedule. n«»
| great trouble would be caused for
.there is little through travel fntrn
Dayton to the coast. About 12 pas
sengers a month. 1 think it is. If these
cases were urgent, arrangements
could be made over the O. R. & N. as
'I have suggested.
"W e will take the matter up with
the Dayton people and will try to
have it settled as soon as possible. I
think there will be no trouble in ar
ranging the matter when they see the
advantages it would bring.
"While we are disappointed in not
getting the extra train to Pasco, yet
we are greatly pleased to thir.k we
will soon have a through sleep« r ser
vice to Spokane. This will greatly bet
ter traveling conditions and I hope it
will not be long before we have the
extra train which we desire."
General Manager Nutt has agreed
that the train should change time as
suggested by th e Commercial club If
Dayton will consent.
MORE STORAGE
NOT NECESSARY
FARMERS AND WAREHOUSE MEN
SHOULD GET TOGETHER AND
SETTLE DIFFICULTIES.
I "Where there is any real need shown
for a side track to a warehouse we
I will try to grant the request/ said
I General Manager Mutt of the North
lem Pacific yesterday in an interview .
"'I think there are enough ware
i house facilities now, there is no need
I for more. The thing to be done is for
(the farmers and the warehousemen to
j get together and adjust the difficulty.
I The matter should not be made a
j contention, it would be much bet
: ter for the two sides to get together
and fix the thing up without trouble.
"We have enough stations on this
branch and we will not consider any
applications for sidetracks where
there are no stations. Where there
are stations and there is shown to be
a need for a side track, we will al
ways give the matter consideration.
"If any of our right-of-way is
needed for warehouse purposes we are
iic,i ->qj jo; it .»si:.»| 01 Xiu|[i.\v
we would rattn r see the facilities now
exis'ing used than for the farmers or
any one else to build more ware
houses.
,"This would only mean added ex
pense to both railroads and people and
it would do no better service than
that now constructed if it were prop
erly used. Where necessity is shown,
however, we are willing to grant the
desired privileges and build side-
(Continued on Page Two)
RAILWAYS WILL SETTLE
WILL REDUCE PASSENGER RATE
IF ALABAMA WILL NOT RE
VOKE STATE CHARTER.
MONTGOMERY, Ala., Aug. B.—
Governor Comer has announced that
he will give an answer before night to
•he Southern railways. An offer was
made to lower the passenger rate to
11-2 cents and withdraw all suits
against the state if the commonwealth
will not enforce the revocation of the
road's charter in Alabama. The im
pression prevails that Comer will re
fuse on the grounds that the state is
entitled to a low rate.

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