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The Lynden tribune. (Lynden, Wash.) 1908-current, December 14, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085445/1922-12-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XV.
POULTRYMEN URGED
TO ATTEND SCHOOL
Lynden Farmers Invited To An
nual Institute at Laurel; Ex
perts To Speak
Lynden poultrymen are urged
to make plans now to attend
the annual county poultry school
to be held December 27 to 29
at Laurel. The institute is in
charge of the extension division
of Washington State College.
The following program has been
arranged:
Wednesday, December 27th.
9:30 A. M. Enrolment.
10:00 A. M. "Producing Hatch
ing Eggs." W. D. Buchanan,
Poultry l tp4!iiilMt HxU-'iMftl
Service, state Colli* 3 oi Wash
ington.
11:00 A. M. "Incubation," -Mrs.
Geo. R. Shottp, V sultry Special
ist, Western Wa«l|l'iittOU Cx
jiei'lmert Jiilito't.
IT 00 Dun 11, (Bring your lunch.
Hot coffee can be secured at
school.)
12:30 P. M. "Brooding," W. D.
Buchanan,
1:30 P. M. "Feeding for Egg Pro-'
duction," Mrs. Geo. R. Shoup.
2:30 P. M. "Tho Necessity of;
Poultry Organization," D. S.
Mc Dole, Washington Co-oper
ating Egg and Poultry Associa-'
tion.
Thursday, December 281 li
9:45 A. M. "Maturing tho Pul
let," W. I). Buchanan.
11:00 "Care and Feed Through
the Molt," Mrs. Geo R. Shoup.
11:00 Lunch.
12:30 P. M. "Yards and Green
Feed," W. D. Buchanan.
1:30 P. M. "Housing and Equip-;
ment," Mrs. Geo. R. Shoup.
Friday, December 29th
9:45 A. M. "Accredited Hatch
eries and Trapnesting," W. D.
Buchanan.
11:00 A. M. "Common Poultry
Diseases," Dr. W. T. Johnson,
Veterinarian, Western Wash-!
ington Experiment Stat'on.
12:00 Lunch.
12:30 P. M. "Poultry Disepses," j
(Illustrated) Dr. W. T. John
■on.
1:30 P. M. "Egg Record Keep-'
ißg," A. D. Foster, President
Whatcom County Poultry As
sociation.
2:00 P. M. Question Box.
The program will start prompt
tf at 9:45 A. M. and close at
3:15 P. M. Every poultryman is
requested to bring a lunch. Hot
coffee may be secured if desired
at the school.
USE THOSE HEALTH
SEALS THIS YEAR
Buy Christmas Stamps and Aid
in Fight on Tuberculosis; On
Sale In Lyndon
With the close of the first |
week of the Christmas seal sale,
the forces which have combined
to dispose of at least 7,500,000 j
of these little humanitarian stick
ers have made a flying start and
are now busily intent on
strengthening any weak spots In
their selling organization. Many
county managers have already re-
Ordered seals and health bonds
and the headquarters of the j
Washington Tuberculosis Asr.o- j
elation has been working at the
top speed to meet the demand for
additional supplies.
The host of school children in
the state have been impatiently
awaiting tho day when they
would be permitted to take part
and until the end oi the saie i
these eager little champions of
better health will swarm through
the roside.vß district! of their;
various coram unities, giving cv- j
..ory one an opportunity to buy at j
iVast five seals, the minimum j
number necessary to adequately
carry on the tuberculosis cam- |
paigii in county, state and nation :
tie coming /ear.
Coincident will, the erd <r from
the General author-!
izing the sale of seals in the post
office lobbies, thus giving the en
('oisement aa l itbt' r< of the
Federal Government to the sale,
are announcements from Samuel
Gompers, President of the Amer- I
ican Federation of Labor; Ed. S. j
Vaught, International President
of the Lion Clubs, and Mrs. W.
W Ballaine, Chairman, Health
Committee State Federation of
Womens Clubs, all urging upon
their members participation in
the grent national campaign be
ing waged against tuberculosis.
The sale closes December 23.
Everyone in Lynden should, be
fore that time, become a partner
in the work by buying and using
his quota of seals. "The good
they do depends on you."
I'ost pone Bazaar
The Northwood Willing Work
ers Club have Indefinitely post
poned their Bazaar, which was
to have been held at the Grange
Hall Saturday evening.
, o
Miss Gertrude Sehuyleman who
is attending the Success Business
College, spent Sunday with her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. Schuyle-
Uov and Mrs. E. Joling en
tertained Friday evening for Mr.
nnd Mrs. J. De Jager und Mr.
and Mrs. John Dreen.
Wst Hpfoen Cutome
EVERYBODY'S DOING IT;
PROCRASTINATING
Everybody's procrastinating
In Lynden this week —putting
off to tomorrow, or when the
frost is off the pipes, what,
they can't do today.
The snow put tho word
"Postpone" on everybody's
rewby lips. The Tribune la
breaking out with it in ev
ery second paragraph.
CONFERENCE URGES
STATE INCOME TAX
Would Have Legislature Adopt
New Plans To Lift Burden On
Ileal Estate
One, hundred and fifty taxpay
ers, representing every section
and Interest of the state, pro
duced out of their state taxation (
conference in Tacoma last week
the State Tax Limit League, and ,
a platform declaring for rigid
governmental economy and elim
ination of several state tax lev
ies, a tax on personal income, a
business income tax, a gross
earnings tax on all public ser
vice corporations, and limitation
to 40 mills on a 50 per cent val
uation tho total tax to be paid
by property.
The Tribune has been steadily
urging the adoption of a stat.j in
come tax, as the only reasonable
way to lift the burden from the
real-estate,
Ine Income lax was strongly
favtrod by th'i convention, and
I v the majority of the logisla
t irn present, to lift the tax bur
den materially off of property,
I* was estimated that tlid Income
tax would produce between ten
r.rd twelve million dollars in rev
enue to the utate,
The conference heard propos
als that a sales tax be adopted,
and refused the measure.
Represented at the conference
were: Wash. Coal Producers,
Farm Bureau, State Grange, Hor
ticultural Ass'n., Berry Growers
Ass'n., Manufacturers' Ass'n.,
Lumbermen's Ass'n., Shingle
Mfg. Ass'n., Federated Indus
tries of Wash., and the Associat
ed Industries of Seattle, Tacoma
and Spokane. Tax leagues of al
most every county also were rep
resented, and in the meeting were
Sonate and House Leaders, coun
ty officials and others.
In brief, the program of the
State Tax Limit League, adopted
at tho meeting, proposes the fol
lowing:
1. Budget law, with office hold
er liable on his personal bond
jfor excess expenditure; requiring'
county commissioners to annu
lally adopt road building program
Ifor ensuing year, which shall not
|be departed from.
2. Pay scale for work done for
i municipal bodies shall not ex
ceed pay scale- of private con
tractors.
3. Serial bond retirement plan;
compulsory formation of sinking;
fund to provide for retirement on
such bonds according to their
terms.
4. Extension of Consolidated
Election Law to all counties, as
well as those of first class.
j 5. State's permanent highway
levy to be optional with counties;
'and public highway levy repeal
ed, to be replaced by one-cent
j additional gasoline tax.
<>. Repeal of half-mill state levy
for capitol buildings; repeal half
mill levy for reclamation fund,
this fund to bo turned into the
general fund, with exception of
amount sufficient to maintain hy
draulic engineer's office.
j 7, Consolidation of departments
lof government, to prevent dupli
j cation.
8. State wide school survey to
I eliminate waste.
j 9. Reduction of statutory lim
its on certain millage funds, as il
lustration: State General —5 to
! 2% mills; County Current —8 to
6 mills; Schools—lo to 8 mills;
I Road and Bridge—4 to 2 mills;
I Road Districts—lo to 8 mills, de
fending upon what complete In
| veftigation will show to be pos
: sible.
I 10. Retention of fifty per cent
! valuation basis of assessment.
J 11. Constitutional convention
[with amendments to be submit
ted to 192 4 electorate.
| 12. Tax on net income earned
|in the state or elsewhere. $1,0 0 0
exemption single person; $2,000
married person, $200 additional
for each dependent. Rate on
first $1,000, 2 per cent; $2,000
3 per cent; $3,000, 4 per cent;
$4,000, 5 per cent; $5,000 or 'i(>,
! 6 per cent.
13. Business tax on net in
comes, to be offset on personal
| income tax statement.
14. Gross earnings tax on all
'public service corporations.
I 15. Limit of total mlllagu to
-forty mills on a 50 per cent val
; i.i.tton as a maximum to be lev
ied on real and tangible personal
i property.
IG. These recommends tens to
|he prepared for submission te
legislature in form of bll't.
—n i
Hot urn to Bremerton
Mr. and Mrs. John Van Ros
sum and children left Monday
for their home in Bremerton.
! after a two weeks visit with
j relatives here.
LYNDEN, WASHINGTON, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1922
CHRISTMAS MAILING
RUSH STARTS HERE
Postmaster I). L. Beckes Makes
Suggestions To Assist In Prop
er Handling of Parcels
Rules governing the mailing of
Christmas packages were given
out today in a statement by Post
master D. L. Beckes.
"If the following rules are ob
served in addressing Christmas
mail it will not only expedite
the business of the postoffice but
will prevent the loss of a great
deal of mail during the rush sea
son.
All Eastern mail should be out
by December 15th, tomorrow, to
insure delivery by Christmas Day.
Packages should bo mailed
not later than 3 o'clock to make
sure they will get out on the af
ternoon mail during the present
rush. Prom 10 to 3 is the best
time to mail your packages.
Please take your parcels out
of the postoffice as fast as they
come in to avoid accumulation.
- "Prepay postage fully on all
parcels.
"Address parcels fully and
plainly, giving the street address
if possible.
"Place name and address of
the sender on all matter.
"Pack parcels carefully in
strong, durable containers.
"Wrap parcels securely; but
do not seal them except when
bearing a printed label or en
dorsement reading, 'Contents
merchandise—4th Class Mail.'
This parcel may be opened for in
spection if necessary, as sealed
packages not so labeled or in
dorsed are subject to postage at
the letter rate.
"Parcels may be marked, 'Do
not open until Christmas.'
"Insure valuable parcels.
"Do not enclose letters with
the parcels, as doing so would
subject the entire parcel to letter
J postage.
"Written greetings, such as
'Merry Christmas,' Happy New
[Year,' 'With Best Wishes,' and
| the names, numbers of symbols
: for the purpose of description
may bo enclosed in fourth class
lor parcel post mail. Books may
j bear simple dedicatory inscrip-
I (ions, not of a personal nature.
Other written additions subject
parcels to letter postage. Com
munications prepaid at the first
class rate may be sent with par
cels prepaid at fourth class rate
by securely attaching the enve
lopes containing the letter or
written matter to the outside of
the parcels."
ARRIVES FROM DAKOTA
TO MAKE HOME IN LYNDEN
Frank Claverinr of Wjsttield,
M. D., arrived in Lynden, Sun
cl'iy, expecting to locate here.
TRIO FROM LYNDEN SEEK
TO BECOME U. S. CITIZENS
Among those who will seek
naturalization as American cit
izens at hearings before Judge
Neterer at Bellingham January
2 are Ray Vander Kooi, Jacob
Dykman, and Arie Vander Hock.
MISS BETSEY HOFTIEZER
OPERATED UPON FRIDAY
Miss Betsey Hoftiezer was ta
ken to the St. Joseph's Hospital
in Bellingliam Friday, where one
of her eyes was operatod on.
Mrs. Herman Oldemeyer is stay
ing with her.
Enrolls in Normal School
Miss Johanna Scliuyleman en
rolled as a student at Ul3 Bel
linr.hnm Normal School Monday.
dnnsDl tint lon at 9br fartflr Pilot tab Ohr tunbrn Sun
ALBERT SEGEI. UNDERGOES
APPENDICITIS OPERATION
Albert Segel, the eleven year
old son of Mr. and Mrs. John
Segel, underwent an operation
for appendicitis at St. Joseph's
hospital, Monday evening.
Mrs. Segel is with him in
Bellingham.
NOBILITY WILL DINE
ON LYNDEN FRUIT
Old England Buys Of»o Cases of
Local Raspberries and Pears;
Go Direct from Kellingham
The nobilit) ,of old England,
together with the others on the
island whose bl'»od isn't so blue,
will soon be dining off Lynden
raspberries and Lynden pears.
During the past few days, the
Lynden Producers Canning Com
pany has shipped 050 cases of
the fruit direct to London, Eng
land, for sale throughout Brit
ain. The fruit was purchased in
Lynden by representatives of
Morrison, Jones Co., Limited, who
sampled the fruit, and paid cash
for it.
The shipment will go direct
to England from Belliugham.
The fruit was loaded on the
9. S. "Texan" at the P. A. F.
dock at South Belliugham.
D. W. Bender, who is in charge
at the local cannery, has been
busy the past week in an effort
to keep the building warm, and
prevent the~ hundreds of cases
of fruit stored there from freez
ing. A battery of stoves has
been kept going.
LYNDEN TO MEET
HARMONY TEAMS
Girls and Boys Will Play Friday
at Loral Gymnasium; Fast En
counters Expected
Lynden will meet the Harmony
basketball teams Friday night at
the local gymnasium, promising
fans here two exciting games.
Harmony has not been defeat
ed yet, and has several stars,
among them two players who
were with the Whatcom High
School team last year.
The girls game will start at
8 o'clock.
ARRIVES FROM CANADA
TO MAKE HOME IN LYNDEN
J. Bronsema from Edem, Sas
katchewan, with his wife, his
n.cther and his brother arrive!
in Lynden Sunday, expecting to
make their home here. Tr.ev
rave taken rooms at the Miller
Hotel.
LYNDEN PEOPLE MUST SERVE
ON JURY IN JANUARY
The following names have been
drawn for January superior court
jury service:
Bernard Werdkan, William V.
Weber, R. C. Russell, George
White, Herman Bouuia, William
Preston.
Arrives from Allien.i
Mr. James Cerner of Alberta,
arrived here Sunday to join hi*
wife and little daughter, Ethel.
Tluy are staying at the Jam OX
htuehart homj
Mr. and Mrs. P. M. Serrurier,
Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Beckes, and
Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Lewis were
dinner guest? Monday evening of
Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Knapp.
KNEE-DEEP IN CHRISTMAS
TEST LOCAL COWS
FOR NEW LOW PRICE
Organization Begins Work on Re
duced Scales; More Herds Are
Needed
Whatcom County's new cow
testing organization, operating
on a more economical plan than
any yet organized in this state,
is now under way, with the offic
ial tester appointed and ready for
work.
The following announcements
concerning the Association work
were sent out this week by H.
B. Carroll, jr., county agent:
The Whatcom County Cow
Testing Association was organ
ized November 28 with 120 mem
bers and 1400 cows. The follow
ing men were elected officers to
manage the Association for 1023;
Claude Qraham, Ferndale, Pres
ident; J. A. Weide, Everson H. 4,
Secreyyy-Treasurer; Trustees, C.
M. Vander Grlend, Lynden; By
ron Porter, Custer; E. J. Sinnes,
It. 4. Bellingham.
The directors are pleaded to
state that they have secured Mr.
Guy Anderson, of La Center,
Washington, to act as tester. Mr.
Anderson at the present time Is
employed by the Oregon Agricul
tural College and is doing official
testing in Oregon. He is a grad
uate of the State College of
Washington and specialized in
dairy work. He is thoroughly
qualified and will be of great as
sistance to the dairymen in work
ing out their feeding rations.
The Directors expect to get the
testing started about January 2
and wish to complete the 1500
that they started out to get. The
rate is still $1.25 per cow for the
year. Anyone wishing to join
may do so by sending their name,
address and number of cows to
Mr. J. A. Weide, Secretary-Treas
urer, R. 4, Everson, and he will
notify the tester.
The Board of Directors ' feel
that through this Testing Asso
ciation they are giving the dairy
men of the County who have
joined, an opportunity to accom
plish some real results. The
State College of Washington is
squarely behind this Testing As
sociation and will work hand in
hand with the tester and the
membership.
With the shortage of feeds
grown on the farms this year and
the steadily increasing price on
purchased grain and hay, it will
pay any man to join this Asso
ciation to learn how to keep
down the cost of production by
using his feeds to the best ad
vantage. "Balanced rations pay."
E. J. ELLIOTT PROMOTED
I BY STANDARD OIL COMPANY
E. J. Elliott was this week
promoted by the Standard Oil
Company, and transferred to take
charge of the station at Demiug.
Albert Haveman has been add
ed to the Lynden staff in bis
place.
VISIT OF SEATTLE MINISTER
IS DELAYED BY SNOW
On account of the storm, Rev.
M. Flipse was unable to preach
at the Reformed Church on Gro
ver Street Sunday.
He is expected next Sunday.
Entertained at Dinner
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Landaal
and children were Sunday dinner
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Gerrit
Schuyleman.
Improvements at Kauffinan's
Fred Cheney and E. E. Horton
are Improving the driveway at
the Kauffman Tire Shop. The
entry way Is being changed.
AND THF SUSPENSE WILL
BE OVER MONDAY
The suspense will be over i
Monday evening, when the \
city council draws straws, or j
toothpicks, shoots craps, or 1
tosses a coin to see whether i
Walter Pixley or John Boer- j
have gets the contested place !
on the Council.
At the city election, each
received 124 votes for the
job.
I
I O
CROWD ATTENDS
ELSNER SERVICESi
In Spite of Snow, Friends Gather
at Funeral of Prominent Lyn-!
den Citizen
In spite of the snow and cold j
weather, a large crowd of clt- 1
Izens of the Lynden district gath
ered at Knapp's Parlors Tuesday
afternoon to attend funeral ser- ;
vices for the late Carl Eisner,
who passed away Friday evening.
Mr. Eisner had been a resident
of the Lynden district for twen
ty-three years, during Which per- '
iod lie had made many friends in |
all sections.
Rev. Tslueger of Vancouver,
B. C,, conducted the service.!. j
Mr. Eisner had been as jolly
as usual Friday, until 8:30 p. I
m., when he became suddenly 111
'and was unconscious when the ;
doctor arrived. He never rallied.
Carl Eisner was bom Sep. 10,
1858 In Germany. He came to
the United States 39 years ago,
-ettiing In Berlin, Nebraska, and
in 1899 came to Lynden.
He was married Nov. 12, 18S2
to Miss Emily Ilagemeister In
Germany. To them were born
twelve children, eleven of whom
survive, together with the wid
ow. They are Frank of Victor,
Fred, Alfred, Henry, Rudolph,
and Walter at home, John at
Seattle, Carl at Ten Mile, Mrs.
Magdalena Miller and Mrs. Anna
Klander of Ten Mile, and Minnie
Eisner at home. One son, Albert,
passed away in ISB7 in Nebraska.
Mr. Eisner was a member of J
the M. W. A.. Camp 5527.
THE "LYNDEN CLUB" FORMED
ISY HELLINGH.VM RESIDENTS
Tho Lynden Club, comprised
of seven couples, all of them well
known In Lynden, held their in
itial meeting at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. J. A. Wort hington In
Bellingliam Saturday evening.
The charter members of the
new Bellingliam club are Mr. and
Mrs. B. H. Lorlng, Mr. and Mrs.
R. H. Plaster, Mr. and Mrs. Wil
liam Terry, Mr. and Mrs. Archie
Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Rath
man, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Worth
ington, and Mr. and Mrs. Milford
Benjamin. The club will meet
fortnightly to play five hundred.
PLANS CHRISTMAS PARTY
FOR AMPHYCTION CUB
Mrs. G. W. Robertson will en
tertain the Amphyction Club at
her home Friday afternoon with
a Christmas party.
STARTS HOME FROM YAKIMA
OX BIKE; CHANGES MIND
Ted Rutgers, who has been
working in Yakima, returned to
Lynden Monday.
He intended to make the trip
on his motorcycle, hut the snow
made him change his mind.
EXCHANGE OF PULPITS
POSTPONED BY REV. BAKER
The exchange of pulpits be
tween Rev. Charles Baker of the
Baptist Church and Rev, Cong
don of Suiiias, ha 3 been post
poned until after the New Year.
As a consequence, Rev. Baki r
will preach here Sunday evening,
and will deliver a pre-Christmas
message, on the Subject, "The
Plea of an Ancient Patriot."
POSTPONE AUCTION OP
LADIES' AID UNTIL DEC. 21
The auction sale of the Ladies
Aid of the Reformed Church on
Grover Street, and the Girls'
League of Service, has been post
poned from this evening for one
week, until Thursday, Dec. 21.
The auction will be held a'
the I. O. O. F. Hall. A short
program will be given, and col'
fee and doughnuts will be served
free. Everybody is Invited.
n
LYNDEN G. A. R. post
ELECTS NEW OFFICERS
The Lynden G. A. It. Pout
elected the following new officers
Oil Tuesday:
Commander, W. I. Baker; Sen
ior Vice Commander, \V. W.
Palmer; Junior Vice Commander.
Charles Runyan; O. D., B. li.
Jones; Q. M., J. C. Spaulding;
Surgeon, H. A. Booth; Chaplain.
C. F. Wurthen; Adjutant, A. J.
Rusco; Guard, William Froth
ingham.
Meeting Postpone<l
The North wood
ers' Association will not meet
this month, as announced in the
Northwood items en Page Sev
en, but will meet the second
Tuesday in January.
IT'S BEEN A TRIFLE
COOL IN SPOTS HERE
Drifts Block Roads, and When
They're Shoveled Through,
Northeaster Starts Again
Lynden has been covered with
(lie heaviest snow in several years
1n 11 this week, with all the at
tendant difficulties of getting
through drifted roads. At all
times, however, the mail has
been brought in by the automo
| bile stages without more than an
i hour or two delay.
The thermometer dropped to
! eight or nine Tuesday, and since
! that time it has been ten degrees
and more higher. The chilly
Northeast wind, Which started
! last week, eased off Monday and
Tuesday, and starfed ugaln on
I Wednesday night.
1 To take care Of the milk «t>,l
cream that had accumulated
! miring the storm, the Hairy .'vi
! sod.il on had twehe extra
and extra shovelcrs for each
hauling on Monday and
,'tlesday where the road w; i
upetfed enough to make it pj-.si
|).le.
TWO . rews of men with lnow
;r,uws and teams were WOrfc'ng
ito < pen the roads that wero
b\ cited by drifts.
| To all tliese iv well as the rog
lular crew, the Association serv
ed hot lunches throughout the
Iday, Monday and Tuesday. Some
idea of the number of lunches
served can be obtained when it
|is known that on Monday alone
thirty pounds of cheese, thirty
'six loaves of bread, ten pounds
of butter, and fourteen dozen
doughnuts were used. It took
four gallons of cream and eight
pounds of sugar to trim tho
coffee used that day.
On Monday, it was necessary
to haul the milk and cream from
Ferndale and Acme through Bel
linghara. and four extra trucks
were employed for this. One of
these trucks driven by Peter
Sondergard left the Association
plant at seven-thirty Monday ev
ening with one hundred and six
ty empty cans, with a forty-mile
j trip ahead to finish the day's
work.
On Tuesday the roads were op
ened up so that the work of haul
ing was getting back to normal.
I And on Wednesday night, the
wind drifted the snow over the
roads again, making the situa
tion just what it was in the first
' act.
SEEK AID HERE FOR
STRICKEN ASTORIA
Lynden Asked To Contribute To
j Help People Of Burned City;
j Fund Started
Lynden has been asked to as
sist in raising a fund to aid the
people of Astoria, which was lev
eled by a disastrous fire last
week. The entire business dis
trict was destroyed, and hundreds
of families, the breadwinners of
which were employed in factories
anil stores, are in real need.
W. 11. Waples was requested
by the Bellingliam relief com
mltee, to take charge of the As
toria fund hero. At a meeting of
a group of Lynden ministers and
businessmen held yesterday, it
i was decided to make no personal
i canvas of the district, but to
publish the appeal, and trust to
! the generosity of the people to
.make up the fund.
Subscriptions will be received
by W. H. Waples for the fund,
and the full list of donors will
|be published in The Tribune.
DELTA & SUNSHINE
E. Gelms received a telegram
Sunday morning .advising him
of the serious illness of his
brother, Adam Gelms, in Seattle.
Mr. Gelms and his sister, Mrs.
Boehringer, left Monday for Se
attle.
Mabel Keller was out of school
last week because of illness.
I There was no school at Sun
! shine Monday and Tuesday be
cause of the bad weather.
Mrs. A. Harlander has return
led home from Lynden, where she
has been nursing the past week.
Mrs. Jay Johnson, Mrs. J. B.
i McPhail and Mr. John Swanson
have been on the sick-list tho
past week.
Rev. Swartz of Stanwood filled
tile pulpit of tbe Swedish Bap
jtist Church Wednesday after
noon.
Mr. Wesley Keidel, who has
been visiting at the Pittman home
'has returned to Aberdeen. Roy
Keidel is making an extended
visit witli his grandparents.
I Mr. Paul Helgath has gone to
Seattle to seek employment.
The Busy Bee Society will
meet at the home of Mrs. C.
El icaon Thursday afternoon, Dec.
14.
Has Bin Inlay Party
Alvin Weidkamp entertained
.so-.ne of his friends Saturday ut
| his home in honor of his birth
day anniversary.
Returns from Seattle
Miss Adah Pyeatt returned on
Sunday from Seattle, where she
spent a week visiting friends.
NO. 26

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