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Pullman herald. [volume] (Pullman, W.T. [Wash.]) 1888-1989, October 22, 1915, Image 5

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085488/1915-10-22/ed-1/seq-5/

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Washington state College Football _ M "" ' '____} is Making Enviable Itecord Under Coach William H. Diet/
WELCOME THE THRUSHES
Washington, D. C. — That thrushes
—the group of birds in which are
included robins and bluebirds—do a
great deal of good and very little
harm to agriculture, is the conclu
sion reached by investigators of the
United States Department of Agri
culture who have carefully studied
the food habits of these birds. Al
together, there arc within the limits
of the United States 11 species of
thrushes, five of which are common
ly known as robins and bluebirds.
The other six include the Townsend
solitaire, the wood, tho veery, the
gray-cheek, the olive-back, and the
hermit thrushes.
. The robins and bluebirds nest
close to houses, and even the shyest
of the other species are content with
the seclusion of an acre or two of
woodland or swamp. For this rea
son the thrushes are among the best
known and most carefully protected
cf native American birds, and at
times their numbers become so great
that it is feared they will do much
harm to crops and fruit. The recent
investigations of the Department of
Agriculture, however, show that
there is very little ground for this
fear. On the other hand, they de
stroy such a vast number of insects
each year that it is probable that
without them many crops would suf
fer serious damage.
• Of all the thrushes, the robin is
probably tho best known. It has
been frequently accused of destroy
ing fruits and berries, but it has now
been ascertained that this only oc
curs in regions that are so thickly
settled that there is no wild fruit
upon which the robin may subsist.
la some years the bird is a great pest
in the olive orchards of California,
but it is probable that they are
driven to the orchards because of the
scarcity of native berries at these
times. Whore wild fruit is avail
able, the birds seem to prefer this
to the cultivated varieties.
Like the robin, the bluebird is
very domestic, but unlike the robin,
it does not prey upon any cultivated
product or work any injury whatso
ever to the fruit grower. During the
fruit season, in fact, five-sixths of
its food consists of insects. It seems,
therefore, that the common practh
of encouraging the bluebird to nest
near houses by placing convenient
boxes In which it may build its home
is thoroughly justified.
A detailed description of the hab
its of the robins and bluebirds is con
tained in Bulletin No. 171 of th«
United States Department of Agri
culture. Bulletin No. 280, which
has just been published, takes up the
habits of the six other species of the
thrush group, which are not quite so
well known. These birds also feed
Principally on insects and fruit, but
a great portion of the fruit which
they consume is wild berries. Do
mestic fruits are eaten so sparingly
by these species that the damage
done Is quite negligible.
* The bird known as the Townsend
solita.re is noted chiefly for its Bong,
which is said to be at times the finest
Sof any of, the thrush family. This
§ thrush, however, confines itself al
most entirely to the mountains and
gorges of the far west. The wood
thrush, on the other hand, is dis
tributed over the eastern part of the
United States, and is a frequenter of
. open groves and bushy pastures.
This thrush also is noted for Its
sweet Bong,' especially in the early
evening. It does not nest in gardens
or orchards, however, and 'is seldom
seen about farm buildings, so that
many, people who are familiar with
• its song would not know the bird by
sight. The wood thrush consumes a
number of very harmful insects such
as the Colorado potato beetle and'
white grubs. The fruit which it eats j
It usually picks up from the ground
Instead of taking fresh from the
tree. There is therefore no reason
why the wood thrush should not be
rigidly protected.
. The food of the other varieties
also seems to consist of little that it j
injures anyone to have the birds eat, i
while on the other hand they destroy i
multitudes of harmful insects each
year.
NEW BULLETINS * I
I
"Butter Making on the Farm" is I
the title of a bulletin just issued by
the Extension Department of the
State College, it is written by Prof. I
.1. X. Price, extension specialist In
Dairying, and may be secured by a.l
dressing. Extension Dept.. Stat:. Col
lege.
"Time and Method of Tillage on
the Yield and Comparative cost of
Production of Wheat in tli3 Palouse
Region" is the title of Bulletin No.
12.!. issued by the Experiment Sta
tion. This bulletin is comprehensive
and should be In the hands of every
farmer in Eastern Washington, It is
written by Professors C. C. Thorn
and 11. F. Holts, soil physicists, and
may be obtained by addressing Ex
periment Station, State College.
A frequent cause of fall colds in
the pullet flock is the crowding of
the pullets on the roosts or under
them at night, states Helen Dow
Whitaker, head of the Poultry Hus
bandry Div. of the State College.
Even where there is plenty of roost
ing room provided, it often happens.
as the first chilly fall nights come
on, that the young pullets huddle to
gether in the corner to get warm.
The result is that they become over
heated in the mass, and if one were
to put his hand for five minutes
among them at midnight, he would
find it covered with moisture.
Pullets will not spread out very
much after they are once settled for
the night. If crowded they are weak
ened instead of refreshed by their
sleep and they get down from the
roosts overheated and damp, into the
chill of the gray dawn, the cause of
the cold is not far to seek. The rem
edy is to provide plenty of roost
room, then go among the birds at
night and scatter them upon the
roosts until the habit of huddling is
broken up.
TWO MORE COW TESTING
ASSOCIATIONS ORGANIZED
The Enumclaw Co-operative Cow
Testing Association was organized
September 24, by A. J. Lashbrook
and W. E. Meyer, dairy field agents.
The association starts with 35 mem
bers and 510 cows registered.
Messrs. Lashbrook and Meyer, co
operating with Mr. O. .V. Patton,
county agriculturist of Walla Walla
county, organized the Walla Walla
Valley Cow Testing association Sep
tember 29. This association has a
membership of 35, partly in Wash
ington and partly near Freewater,
Ore. Five hundred and four cows
were registered and work will begin
as soon as a tester can be secured.
KEEPING APPLE CIDER
SWEET BY THE HOME
CANNING METHOD
' Fill fruit jars with the fresh apple
cider. Add a tablespoonful of sugar
to each quart. Place rubber and cap
In position, partially tighten, or cap
and tip the tin cans. Sterilize in
hot water bath outfit for 10 min
utes; in water-seal outfit for eight
minutes; in the steam-pressure out
fit, under five pounds of steam, for
four minutes; 4 in the aluminum
pressure cooker for two minutes.
Remove jars, tighten cover, invert to
cool, and test joint.
-Note —if you desire tno appie
cider to be a little tart or slightly
fermented, it will be necessary to
let it stand for two or three days be
fore you sterilize, and then add about
two minutes of time to each schedule
given in the recipe.—U. S. Depart
ment of Agriculture.
PUBLIC LAND SALE
Department of the Interior
U. S. Land Office at Walla Walla,
Washington, September 21st,
1915.
NOTICE is hereby given that, as
directed by the Commissioner of the
General Land Office, under provisions
of Sec. 2455, R. S., pursuant to the
application of Elmer C. Hickman,
Serial No. 0 6432, we will offer at
public sale, to the highest bidder, but
at not less than $4 per acre, at 10
o'clock A. M. on the 3d day of No
vember, 1915, next, at this office, the
following tract of land: neq neq, sec
tion 18, T. 14 X.. R. 43 E., W. M.,
( In acres).
The sale will not be kept open, but
will be declared closed when those
present at the hour named have
ceased bidding. The person making
the highest "Eld will be required to
immediately pay to the Receiver the
amount thereof.
Any persons claiming adversely
the above-described land are advised
to file their claims, or objections, on
or before the time designated for
sale.
Not coal land.
FRED M. HEDGER,
W. A. WHITE,
Receiver.
I Oct. 1-29
MUCH ADLER-I-KA USED
IX PULLMAN
lt is reported by White's Drug
Store that much Adler-i-ka is sold
in Pullman. People have found out
that ONE SPOONFUL of this sim
ple buckthorn bark and glycerine
mixture relieves almost ANY CASE
of constipation, sour or gassy stom
ach, It is so powerful that it is
used successfully in appendicitis.
ONE MINUTE after you take it the
gasses rumble and pass out. It is
perfectly safe to use and, can not
gripe.
Two choice newly furnished
rooms for rent by week or month,
with all modern conveniences. Ap
ply 1405 Maiden Lane or Palace
hotel. '„-'■/ acMf
WANTED —A competent woman
cook. Rose Park hospital, phone 56.
«mp24tf
The CITY CLUB
THE HOME
of the
CHAMPION CIGAR
Soft Drinks
Candies
Cigars
Tobaccos
Billiards
Pocket Billiards
Geo. Stephenson Orvllle Stephenson
Proprietors
SOME FACTS ABOUT THE
PULLMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION
To provide a systematic and abso
lutely safe plan for the investment
of savings, and to aid its members
to acyuiro homes of their own is the
object of the Pullman Savings and
Loan Association. The Association
is iv every souse a Home institution
II is lor I lie .'ratlH.il Man, who
realizing the uncertainties of busi
ness and of health, and of tho folly
ut spending all his money as fast as
tie go's it, provides for an emer-
Ki'ucy.
it is tor the Prudent Woman, who
rut of her earnings or allowance, de
sires t-j put away a little money,
monthly, where it will be securely
and profitably invested, and give her
tho least trouble and where she can
gel it hen needed.
It la lor the Voting Man possessing
tlie manhood and determination to
save something every month from
ins earnings as a reserve fund, to
draw on when sick or out of a posi
tion, for providing a home or for a
start in business.
It is lor Hoys and (.ills, to help
them to he economical and Industri
ous and to encourage them to ac
quire the habit of saving, provide s
fund to educate them and to makt
them independent.
Who It's For
It is for Societies, Fraternal and
Other Organizations wishing to in
vest their Income for the purpose ot
treating a reserve fund, or for build
ing.
It is lor all Seeking a Home or
who want to improve their property,
or pay off a mortgage or to provide
a fund for any other worthy purpose.
Call on or Write
M. ft. SNYDKH
Pullman, Washington
RANCH FOR RENT
Quarter section for grain rent,
three to live years, but renter must
buy outfit that goes with place. H.
Folger Realty Co. octltf
A BARGAIN —For sale or trade,
a five-passenger Stoddard-Dayton
automobile; engine is working splen
didly and whole car is in good condi
tion. Wm. Porter. aul3tf
FOR SALE OR RENT— Modern
house, well located. First National
bank of Pullman. jly2tf
WANTED — Experienced woman
for general housework. Phone 2017.
Mrs. E. .1. Osterman. oclStf
Clean as Snow
Cold as Ice !
Is the way we keep all
our stock
Our Fish
Is as Fresh as when taken
from the water.
Try it and you will come
for more.
•^--■P^pS-»----_«S-_eS»S_S-M|^oE--WH---SS--^
CITY MARKET
R. C. HAMILTON
Both Phones 99
Register.
PARTICULAR WORK
FOR PARTICULAR
PEOPLE
General
Repair
Work
Wagon Work a
Specialty
STAR BLACKSMITH &
CARRIAGE SHOP
In rear Pullman Shoeing Shop
MARIO CRISAFULLI
EXPERT
PIANO TUNER
Pianos and player-pianos; sells
and fits player action into any
piano; work guaranteed. Mos
cow, Idaho, Phone 9W. Leave
orders at Beck's theatre, Pull
man.
_i__-STG» . - . ~~* —— —m o-o-o^
.^®__£l__ ja.-^ zf&'ffpz "M%
ji|[ FALL SUITS. ji
I \ y^S^ 'r.flri^ \T7 L !
•M \^it -^jw.i We have receiv- I
IP ll^M?^ ' ;i
g cr. f£i_sz__r" e^ a Fall shipment of !
teSIHHTf Hart, Schaffner !
T j^ w & Marx Suits. «
I V ll You can do no bet
/ ter than get a Hart,
_ —I Schaffner Suit.
L_^_. "V|a,^_i_>
C-l>.fi,.li< il-U Sclmrfuef & Mar.
V. W. CLARKSON
Men's Outfitter
lrj¥s_iATilALM
OF PIANOS »»d PLAYERS
will soon be put on by the oldest established Piano
House in the Northwest. WAIT FOR IT! Most won
derful cut in prices. If you have any idea of. buying a
Piano or Player this fall it will mean a big saving to you
if you will send us your name and address on a postal,
and we will give you full particulars of same without
cost or obligation.
I. W. LANE
PULLMAN, WASHINGTON
WITHOUT COST OR OBLIGATION SEND ME DATE AM)
PARTICULARS OF. PIANO SALE SPECIAL.
SIGN HEM.
P. O. ADDRESS .
Af\'%
T^J Government expert, engineers of Packard
*^ "S^** and Ford companies, and other authori-
ties, declare oil from asphalt-base crude
, has greatest efficiency. And it was on
efficiency that Zerolene, the oil made from
California asphalt-base petroleum, was
awarded highest competitive honors, San
Francisco and San Diego Expositions.
Standard Oil Company t
jIX-^-^ ~*^ (California)
_*—»^ lL*Jr Pullman
ZEROLENE
fgg||g^ the Standard for Motor Cars
*"nT Saturday Specials -..a. -1
1111111 1 It 1 1 1 1 1111111111 1111 11 1 1 1 11111111 11 11 1 1 11111111 11 11 1 1 111 111111 ■ 1111 111 11 1 1111 1 11 M 191 1 111 j
8 H. P. CUSHMAN I
ENGINES
We have a limited number of 8 H. P.
| Cushman Engines on hand that we will j
I sell at a sacrifice. j
•-i__-_.i_____---»_---«----«i-«--__W_^_-^-"'"*-~"|- ~~-^-~~^-~~^-^-B
• - *
These engines are new and equipped with J
! double cylinder, spark plug ignition with high ten- :
! sion magneto, carburator, water pump (with or :
f without radiator and fan), cone clutch, and gravity =
• feed with governor throttle. =
This is one of the best stationary engines on =
j the market. These engines were purchased to be :
used on our harvesters, but as we are going to use j
I a higher power engine another year, we will sell j
j what we have on hand. If you want to buy an j
: engine cheap and on reasonable terms write or :
i call on •
■* ■ •
■- . •
I Idaho National Harvester Co.
I* _ •
__ m 111 •
Moscow, Idaho

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