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Pullman herald. [volume] (Pullman, W.T. [Wash.]) 1888-1989, December 01, 1916, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085488/1916-12-01/ed-1/seq-3/

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Our Thoroughly Remodeled Banking Home
|p To Open For Business Soon
THe latest in modern banking facilities for Pullman. Comfort con
yenlence and efficiency will bo combined in the thoroughly accent"
Bble financial service extended to patrons with the opening of our
neW Home soon. 6 OI our
The growing patronage extended to this Institution has warrant,-.!
the best facilities. This is Pullman's helpful, progressive Bwk
Its Officers extend a cordial invitation to all.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF PULLMAN, WASH.
"Homo of the Palouse Dollar"
REPORT OF Tin: CONDITION
As Made to the Comptroller at the Close of Business Nov. 17. leifl
' RESOURCES
Loans and discounts $620,870.43
U. S. and other bonds 01,623.32
Redemption fund 2,600.00
Stock in Federal Reserve Hank.. 2,700.00
Furniture and fixtures 3 923.86
Cash and due from banks 20.".,722.80
$897,2-10.40
LIABILITIES
Capital stock $ 75,000.00
Surplus and undivided profits... 34,846.08
Circulation 48,200.00
Deposits 739,194.32
$897,240.40
MODERN SAFE DEPOSIT HONES FOR RENT
~ OFFICERS ~ ~*
M. W. Whitlow, president M. Schultheis, Jr., vice president
0. L, Waller, vice president F. ('. Forrest, cashier
C. F. Anderson, asst. Cashier
*6he Pullman Herald
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WM. GOODYEAR, Lessee. KARL P. ALLEN, Editor.
X Published every Friday at Pullman, Washington, and entered at the Pullman
*% poitoffice as second class mail matter.
' ' — -■ OassMBBWCMI 3C— MB ■* '..■-'——-■ | ■■ -. — — , - , , , „f . ■„...-__ ._ ....
$1.00 per Year if paid in advance; if not paid in advance 50 cent* additional.
Pullman, Wash., Friday, December i, 1916
LET IS GIVE THANKS
Never in the history of the nation
have the people of the United States
had greater cause for expressing
their profound gratitude to Almigbt
God than on this Thanksgiving day.
The country has just passed through
the throes of an election in which
the result was bo close as to be in
doubt for weeks. Vet all political
parties have accepted I In- re.suit
cheerfully, without any thought or
threats of violence. This readiness
of the people to abide by the will of
the majority is an inspiring evidence
of their faith In and loyalty to our
democratic form of government.
The whole country is prosperous.
There is a good market for every
form of produce and a job for every
man who wants to work. But the
greatest blessing of all is that the
country is at peace. To fully appre
ciate the magnitude of this blessing
conditions here must be contrasted
with conditions in Europe.
While our boys and girls are go
ing to school, In Europe boys no old
er than ours are going to the front
to be butchered, and girls of high
school age are being shot down as
holes or compelled to witness the de
struction of their homes and the exe
ration of their fathers and brothers.
While our homes are. overflowing
with happiness and contentment, in
Europe there is scarcely a home
which is not in mourning for some
loved one or enveloped in a pall of
anxiety for the safety of one or more
members of its family circle.
While this country is steadily pro
cessing in arts, sciences and human
ities, in Europe the hands of the
clock of civilization are being turned
backward almost to the days of say-
I'eery.
I While our farmers have been
reaping and storing a bounteous
"op, in Kurope the richest harvest is
king garnered by the grim reaper,
death.
a
ji While our fields are being re
newed by beneficial moisture, the
le'<lß of Kurope are being soaked
Wth the life blood of her best and
"favest sons.
While our families are gathering
' tt Joyful re-unions, the families of
Europe are being wiped out or scat-
Wed to the ends of the earth.
In View of all these blessings, the
Poople of this nation should once
Core observe Thanksgiving day in
the spirit of the Pilgrim fathers who
,**tablißhed it, a spirit 0 reverent
latitude to the divine providence
*'hich h?d protected them against
4eath. pestilence and famine.
TjJAI. GOODYEAR.
BOOZE ADVERTISING
- "tMiain Gladstone, the great Eng-
f l,ll statesman, once defined the
.action of government as being.
. ° Wake it as easy as possible to
-°rieht and as hard as possible to do
Wrong..
*™c government of the United
States is not living up to this ideal,
when it permits the use. of its mail
service to carry liquor advertise
ments ami solicitations to buy liquor
into states which have outlawed the
liquor traffic. The object of these
advertisements and solicitations is to
incite violation of the law, and by
opening the mails to them the gov
ernment is making it easy instead
of bard for people to do wrong.
The government has barred the
m.i of the mails to advertisements of
lotteries and to lottery tickets, but
they are not as objectionable as
these liquor advertisements and so
licitations. The purchaser of a lot
tery ticket had a remoteTchance of
winning, but the purchaser of booze
is a sure loser.
Tin. liquor dealers have no scru
pies as tee whom they send their so
licitations nor as to the false repre
sentations made in their advertise
ments. One St. Paul, Minn., liquor
firm tried to secure from rural mail
carriers "lists of boys" on their
routes, whom they hoped to induce
to become customers. One pure
malt whisky is advertised as "A won
derful health-preserving stimulant,
strengthening the liver, kidneys and
bladder, enriching the blood, toning
and upbuilding the entire system,
promoting a good appetite, keeping
you young and vigorous, invaluable
for over-worked men, nervous, run
down women, and delicate, unde
veloped children."
The national government has no
right to aid and abet the liquor deal
ers in their attempts to increase the
consumption of Intoxicants in states
which are trying to decrease it. The
mails should clearly be barred to
carrying liquor advertisements or so
licitations to purchase liquor, direct
ed to persons residing in dry states,
WM. GOODYEAR.
A SIMPLE REMEDY
The New York Herald gives vent
to the following wail anent the result
of the election:
"While the fact can not be deter
mined with accuracy until there is an
analysis of the official vote, the pres
ent Indication is that the result in
California will have been decided by
the votes of women. The same situa
tion may be disclosed by analysis of
the results in some other Far West
ern states. We do not know. But
we do know that it is little short of
national scandal that women should
be allowed to vote in some states
and not in others- that the selection
of a president and a national admin
istration should be committeed into
the hands of women voters in one
state or group of states when women
of other states are denied the voting
privilege."
The remedy for this alleged na
tional scandal is as obvious as it is
simple. Give the privilege of voting
to the women of New York and every
other state.
WM. GOODYEAR.
OWWWUOTTWS FOR EDUCATED
FARMER HOYS
The boy who has finished the com
mon school, an,; especially the boy
who has jusi completed high school,
stands face to face with some of the
most Important decisions of his life.
He faces these question.-,: Shall he
'"'" school or continue his* school
work? if he continues school, hat
course of study ishall he pursue?
What '•- to be his calling or vocation
ill life?
There are man) factors that influ
ence the boy in making his decision
when he answers these questions.
One of these is the amount of money
thai he himself can earn, or that his
parents may give him for hi- future
education, M takes men. . „ ,-ml
a boy away to school or to college.
When ii comes to the choice of a vo
cation or calling in life, the char
acter and individuality of the boy,
with bis likes and dislikes, play an
Important part. For instance, a boy
who hates law hut loves machinery,
win. is naturally adapted to. and ex
perienced in, machinery, would prob
ably d.. well to decide to study en
gineering ami not to study law.
To the boy on the farm he. likes
farming, the agricultural course is
the most inviting course to take. If
he lives near an agricultural high
school, the first year he probably
would take up the ordinary high
school studies and a course in ele
mentary agriculture. This would he
an Introduction to general agricul
ture, and would take up a study of
plants, soils, fertilizers, crops, In
sects, live stock, feeds, etc. The ag
ricultural subjects in the second year
of high school would probably be en
tirely devoted to a study of farm
crops, such as corn, oats, cotton, etc.,
and most of the crops would be pro
duced by the boys on the high school
farm. The third year in high school
would probably Include a study of
farm animals, covering the types and
breeds of horses, cattle, sheep and
in.-, ami the care, feeding, breed
ing and judging of these animals.
Th.. last year in high school the farm
boy will study soils ami fertilizers
along with the cultural subjects tie
is pursuing.
To the- boy who has finished high
school, and especially an agricultural
high school, the agricultural college
or the university with an agricultural
course offers him an opportunity to
become a specialist ami an expert In
agriculture. This result, of course,
can not be accomplished in just four
years at college, it will lake years
of practical experience after he- has
finished college for him to be at his
best. If at college he wants to take
dairying, he' can devote a reasonable
amount of time to other agricultural
subjects and spend a major portion
of his time studying dairying, cream
separators, milking machines, and In
testing cream and milk for butterfat.
lie will also make butter, ice cream
and chesee over ami over again until
he has mastered the art of their
manufacture
If the young man desires to take
up animal husbandry, lie can special
ize in the Judging, feeding, breeding,
and managing of live stock, Including
beef and dairy cattle, sheep, horses,
bogs and poultry. If, on the other
hand, the young man desires to spe
cialize in farm crops, he can devote
a large portion of bis time to soils,
fertilizers, soil fertility, plant breed
ing, farm management, etc.
Now, after the young man has
graduated from bis agricultural col
lege course, what is tee be bis calling
ill life? He will probably seize the
best opportunity that presents Itself.
if. is important that he should choose
a line of work thai he likes. The de
mand for college trained agricultur
ists is greater than the supply, and
will continue to be so for many years.
FARMERS
Your time is worth money, it runs your business and ac
cumulates for you.
Your buildings and farm products are money and represent
years of hard labor.
Your live stock is more valuable today lha never before,
and equally necessary.
SUPPOSE
Through accident 01 illness you can not work? You have
lost, riot only your time but the expense of such misfortune;
or your buildings and products of the farm arc destroyed by
fire; or through accident or illness your live stock dies; it is a
great loss not only to you and those depending upon you, but
to the community as ... whole, as accumulated wealth and wealth
that otherwise would have been accumulated is lost.
NO WONDER FARMERS SAY, "EVERYTHING IS A GAM
BLE AND WE HAVE TO TAKE OUR CHANCES AS
THOSE IN ALL OTHER OCCUPATIONS"
Mr. Parmer, you do not have to take those chances. Millions
of dollars in risks above named are now being carried by that
old and reliable company—The Hartford.
Downen's Insurance Agency offers tins guaranteed and lib
eral insurance- protection.
Call or write
The Downen Realty Co.
Telephone 1242 108 Main Street
Pullman, Washington
The agricultural college trained man
can except to get more for his serv-
>'* than 1... could get for similar
services In other callings in life.
First of ail, the agricultural col
lege graduate can farm for himself
if he should decide i,, do so when t. •
is 2.'. ■„-.,; old, or 3a. or -". or at
some later time,
lie can tea. agriculture In an ag
ricultural high school or an agricul
tural college. Sixteen years agO
there was not an agricultural high
SChOOI in the- United at.-. now
there are over 3000 high school - and
colleges teaching this BUbject, ami
the number 1* growing enormously.
Large farms and plantations are In
need of farm managers; they aro hir-
Ing agricultural college graduate lo
do tins work.
A large per cent of the counties in
all iin' stales are employing agricul
tural demonstration agents, The
railroads also employ such men. This
line Of work is open to tile. graduate
in agriculturel.
The United States government op
erates 0 7 agricultural experiment
stations, which employ more than
1500 people in the lines of adminis
tration and research. Tbis is one
of tin- open fields for Ho. young man.
Again My- agricultural college
graduate may enter the field of agri
cultural journalism and help produce
on.' of the farm papers among the
many thai are preaching the gospel
of good farming,
The Unite d States department of
agriculture employs an army of help
ers to .any on its work, which In
cludes every phase of agriculture.
Many of these positions are obtained
by civil service examinations, and ten
salaries generally range from $1000
to $3000 per year.- Oklahoma Agri
culturist.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
j Christian Science society holds
services every Sunday morning at
11: o'clock in Masonic hall. Sub
ject of lesson-sermon for next Sun
day, "Cod, the Only Cause and Cre
ator." Testimonial meetings on fin
and third Wednesdays of each month
at 8: 00 o'clock p. m,
EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
Church at I un? Stale- street, ftev.
P. .1. Randolph, B.D. pastor. Sunday
school at 111:1111 a. m. Engl serv
ice at 11 ci a. 111. You are cord 1 -
invited.
' fLUJIILUIL. "- 111 I■MIII -I -■" 1111*1
Here is here you can buy GUAR
ANTEED AUTOMOBILE SUPPLIES,
ACCESSORIES, TOOLS, TIRES,
TUBES, etc, the kind the experi
enced motorist wants because of the
FACT that they are the cheapest in
the end and besides make motoring
so much more enjoyable.
We carry an exceptionally complete
stock and ear prices arc really sur
prisingly close — and everything
HERE is of the HIGHEST standard
of quality.
Don't buy elsewhere, without first
seeing us.
Martin's Oarage
Pullman, Wash.
Patrick & Sheuerman
All Wool
MACKINAWS
(^^K) Than- Will Keep You
gfiftWi^ii ' , . warm During
A'<^FmmAw^ i^w4 This Co d
p^W Kii'^r p|^ Weather
jlll^ Come in and Look
'^^^Q&i^k^ Them Over
W&9K$ i i--v7 ".^v
V. W. Clarkson
MENS OUTFITTER
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
In the Superior Court of the State of
Washington, In and for the
County of Whitman,
In the Matter of the Estate of Will
iam 1. Clark, Deceased.
Notice i.s hereby given by the
undersigned, as the Administrator of
the Estate of William i. Clark, de
ceased, to the creditors of and all
persons having claims against Bald
deceased, to present them with the
necessary vouchers to the said Ad
ministrator within one year after the
date of the first publication of this
notice, to-wit: within on., year after
the 3rd day of November, 1916, at
the. law office of D. C. Dow, in the
City of Pullman, Whitman County,
State of Washington, the same being
the place for the transaction of the
business of said estate; and if not
presented within said time all claims
not so presented will be forever
barred.
Date,l November Ist, 1916
WILLIAM T. CLARK,
As Administrator of the Estate of
William I. Clark. Deceased
D. C. Dow, Attorney for the Es
tate, Pullman, Washington.
Nov.': Dec 1
DOWNEN WRITES INSURANCE
Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!
Quality
== - AND—-—-
Quantity
RULES
AT THE
CITY MARKET
R. C. HAMILTON, Proprietor
Phone 99
LIST YOUR FARM AND CITY PROPERTY WITH US
We Sell The Earth
AND EVERYTHING ON IT
*
REAL ESTATE FARM AND CITY
FARM AND CITY LOANS
INSURANCE RENTALS
NOTARY PUBLIC
Walker & Struppler
Phone 7
Near Post Office
N. W. CAIRNS, Special Agent
Pullman, Wash.
DUTHIK'S
For General White Lead — 10c per
pound In 12 4, 25, 50 or 100 pound
lots. #
GEO. N. HENRY
REAL ESTATE
and INSURANCE
Office, Miii Street
Ramer's
Chocolates
Direct from the Factory
They will Please You
THORPE'S
SMOKE HOUSE
(Incorporated)
Phone 28
Where Everybody Goes
JOHN SQUIRES
Farm Lands
City Property
Mortgage
Loans
flat Iran BUcfc

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