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The Yakima herald. (North Yakima, W.T. [Wash.]) 1889-1914, July 25, 1889, Image 2

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085523/1889-07-25/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE TIIIA HERALD.
«m i cot, Pngwwi.
■■mg RTUV ni’MMl.
♦2.00 PKR ANNUM. IN ADVANCE.
AlttrtMv lafci [pg Afftkatim.
K. M. Raw. Editor'and Butinem Manager.
A DANGEROUS TENDENCY.
Krona such observations. aa may be
made at this distance it appears that
the constitutional convention is starting
of at a rata that will not admit of finish
ing its work In time to submit the docu
ment to the people and give proper notice
for aa election. It may be, however,
that tha folly of tho tint thno week, will
appear to the members sad that enough
of them allies# the —l—ran of their
coarse and turn and go to work in earnest
on what is la be done, which is really not
half an extensive aa would appear from
the length of time taken to perfect tbs
judicial section.
One thing has appeared from the begin
ning, and this is, that too many, if not all
of the seem ben, are playing for a return
to the first legislature of the state. Prob
ably not all of these have a special pur
pose in their desire, though many have
definite notions as to the making of sens
tom, ale. This anbtle arranging for the
future leads many to trim and avoid cer
tain Important questions for fear of work
lag tfri—t tbieelvee in the direction of
apparently favoring capital or corpora
tions. There are always enongb, in a
body like this, of man who believe that
• the p sap Is will be pleased by whatever
may be said or done against aggregate
capital. To those who have baeo watch
ing the growth of this territory for the
past tan years, aad especially the post
five years, it Is clear enough that restric
tion of privileges to capital is precisely
what wa dp not want. The mortgage tax
lav and othar advene legislation in Ore
gon ssatcapltal into this territory, which
hna prospered beyond all territorial pro
cadent, and wa now seem to have tho
opportunity to go into statehood with a
momentum that prom ins wonderful
growth lathe next few years. Capitalists
arson tha ground surveying, aad looking
up project* far investment and an tha
vhela finding everything aa good aad in
many instances batter than they had
hopad. Than is, however, a momentary
halt, aad surveying parties an resting,
while the capitalists gather at Olympia to
watch tha performances of the political
■ftsaaien, fearing from what they have
■sen already that tha constitution will
make h impossible to legislate in favor of
assay of the projects that are* necessary
to build rsiboaefa end other large works,
which private capital can not com pom to
tha extent ainmary to profitably com
pete with large corporations which now
have vested rights here. Of course it
may be mads to arena that, leaving the
legislator* free to somswhat favor future
corporation* aad capitalists, la leaving
it free to favor the now doing
a somewhat arbitrary line of business
among ns, but it don not appear at the
first glance as it should, that without
such possible legislation the existing cor
porations will moot certainly have It their
own way and we can never hope to be en
tirely free bom their clutches. It is much
tkimmlvs as they an than to exert
tbemasivm at each session of the legisla
tive to fight competition.
Thu error at this time of legislation
which would atop the influx of capital
should be apparent to everyone members
el the constitutions! convention as well
aa timir eoMtttasnta. No man who has
iuritimnts la land, no man whe has
projects for manufacturing, no man whs
wishes large sain for his crops with a
awn profit, no man who hopes to an
great development of onr mineral re
sources, and in fact not one of the gnat
{ army who expects to go on toward wealth
hi tha next few yean can regard tha ten
dency at Olympia otherwise than with
fear aad tnmbUag. The only hope is
that tha retrognative tendency maybe
checked beflon the mnatltntifm shill have
bran encumbered by anything mlachtev
ana In this direction.
It ammo to many, on this side of tho
mountains at I fast, that counties should
be loft free to bond themselves lor enter
prism 100 grist for private capital, if they
should era fit to do ee. If the require
ment is mode of a two-thirds vole and a
* per rentage of possible taxation, properly
restricted, the result of such privilege is
ran to be salutary. The people hen
who hove large irrigation schemes In
prospect, aad who may desire to own
their own node Into canyons rich with
cool and othm minerals, certainly should
know what they want as well as any one
In the Constitutional convention can pos
sibly know. A few old Missouri citations
of cases where in the old days when
bonds wan sold before the roods wen
boOt and some barm had come to the
communities have served thus far to keep
duet la the eyes of too many who will
bar*' a role* in tkia matter. Hie in
ataacra where oooattM and dU(m have
been developed and bare came tn i to
large prosperity by reaaooa of oonatitn
tbma that admitted of liberal legislation
are apparently loet right of, and it may
be verbal! be deprived of the privilege
of developing oor own roonty la our own
way. We hope not. We have doaens ol
projects that require aocb concerted action
jm may not be bad nader an Ipblbltorv
raaehtatlaa WUh aocb a maatituUon
«• eon net liter do H oaraelvee, nor hope
to ialirret aotabie capital. From each a
peaapaet wa shrink; dreading a atagna
float wane, perhaps, than that from which
- wa km nMßtlf nw.
With the people storting Ibelr own leg
ktotan and le manage their anomalies,
vnhritoea-ledtodoaabyoarlrithlallis
Imdran people to (oven themselves—
•hat m bum can «M from leaving
■aril, il not everything involved In thla
q oration, to Uu futon, Hint fatnn action
jiar ibo> SI lm aura time.
nmtRRT *F fAKIMI.
Raianl VMlm ilwt MMUnI
TMMlMwikfltaUMMirarfc-
TMtirmaAnr*! iktTkUR.
The papery of the coaat often are filled
with (lowing accounts of the beauties of
Yoeemlte. nr the natural wonders of the
National Park. We hope that some com
petent, inspired pen may he found to suit
ably portray the sublime wonders of na
ture almost at our very doors. Within
fifty miles of North Yakima, easily acces
sible, at the head of the north aad south
forks of the listen, in and about Ug Icy
crest of Mount Kaye, ate natural wonders
and scenery that out-rival Yoeemlte or
the “Park* of the Nation.
Riding out from North Yakima to that
Bet heeds of the northwest, the Yakima
Soda Springs, thence a pleasant horse
back rids over a romantic ridge and under
the shade of the fragrant fir and lordly
pine, brings tha tourist to the crest of
Darland mountain; pausing for a mh
ment to breathe the bones. Immediately
before the traveller is a scene of unpar
alleled grandeur. Almost at hand sn
tha mighty peaks of Tacoma, St. Helens,
Hood, Adams, and the older Mount Kaye
directly in front, all glistening in the sun
as they reflect back its noonday rays,
from their shining glacisn; then tbev
stand, like so many mooarchs of old,
glinting the rays of the summer sun from
their burnished casques. We see water
falls la the distance, dashing like threads
of silver down the mountain side from
the Ice fields. We mark the course of the
avalanche, aa in the winter storms it has
tom down the precipices, sweeping away
hundreds of sens of forest in its mad
career; and almost beneath us, but miles
away, is Wiley’s beautiful valley, which
should be onr camp for the night; where
we arrive, after a few boors’ ride down s
t«fe and comfortable mountain trail, al-
D'ost at the bead of the sooth fork of the
Thian. In this valley is one of the moat
charming spots for s mountain summer
resort imaginable—a large, wide valley of
rich, lose loos grass, dotted with groves of
flr trees, giving it a park-like character;
the joyous, rollicking Tletan, bowling
through itscentar, full of babbling brooks,
gushing springs; tha home of the deer
and mountain grouse, its beauties walled
in by the mighty mooarchs of the Cas
cades; old Mount Kaye, with its eternal
glaciers, like a stem, silent sentinel at its
bead; no more attractive place for the
lover of the sublimity of nature exists.
A short ride the next morning through
this valley, up a sharp backbone ridge
that again divides the south fork, the
branch on the left leading to the well
known Cispos pass, which most soon be
utilised by tome one of our great traas
cootinental railroad lines, a pass away
below the snow line, of gentle slopes and
with a beautiful little mountain lake, foil
of trout almost on its very summit; the
other branch, on the right, which we (ol- 1
low, directly bearing up to the everlasting
glaciers, where one soon arrives. Here I
are innumerable grassy living
ice cold water, for, anomalous as it may
seem, in the summer we find rich, succu
lent grasses in these mountains, high up
above the timber, flourishing and growing
luxuriantly immediately alongside the
gaciers. Turning the hones loose to
grass and grasping an iron-shod staff,
one cad now have Alpine travel to the
surfeit. Around and about the sightseer
are thousands and thousands of acres of
glaciers. You can explore, along the
the edges, icy caves in which a whole
train load of saddle horses and riders may
camp; you can travel over the ice fields,
Jump mighty crevasses, throw rocks down
into their dark, Impenetrable depths,
listen to the rush ol streams far below the
sight of human vlaion, study the effects
of the grinding ice on peak, hillside and
ledgh, look with wonder on the thousands
of tons of rock that have tumbled from
the towering ledges above to the bosom of
the glaciers, crawl along the sharp two
foot ridge dividing the summits, where a
single misstep or a giddy head will plunge
you a thousand feet below; walk over on
the glacier to the north fork and see the
entrancing falls of the ‘‘White Swan,"
that dash fifteen hundred feel into the
abyss from its glacier home; or. If ven
turesome, eUmb high above the snow on
to the sharp rocky peak of Mount Kaye
and feel as if yon were separated from the
. world, alone with nature and its author,
and wonder at your own daring, for one
false step will plunge yon a shapeless
mam; and than, if the hunter’s blood
courses la your veins, gun in band you
can pursue the mountain goats, who in
habit these solitudes of Ire. rock and
snow la large bands and fortunate la the
sportsman shoes nerve and aim Issleadv
and sore enough to gain one of those
prises. Wearying of Alpine travel, the
mind actually tired by so much sublim
ity, homeward bound (or North Yakima,
a short rids down the Tietao, passing the
Lion tails tumbling over huge basaltic
boulder*, leaving the Devil’s Head on the
right, with it* mighty columns, shafts of
basalt, hundreds of tect high, as straight
as an arrow, piercing the Hoods, erected
by a mighty architect and, rights at the
foot of Hound Top moan tala, is found the
wonderful Tietan Chalybeate Hpring.
which for Its miraculous curative powers
la destined to haw a worldwide reputa
tion, and bring health and vigor to tans
of thousands ol afflicted humanity. All
l of this is no fancy picture. Tbs editor of
Herald has not drawn one particle on
his imagination, but it Is all an actual,
living, existing reality in the Tietaa
basin, just west of North Yakima. We
would that vs h«4 s pen to fittingly por
tray the brautles of that region. AH we
can say is, visit it and be convinced that
the truth has not half been told of ft.
In no ooc nepart have the people awn
occanioo lor complaint egrinet the mao*
•getaeat ol the Northern Pacific than la
ka keeping car accommodations, or nthcr
in the lark ol cock arcommodaliooa. It
la the exception when the trxwiicr can
■aeon a berth (com Yakima or F.Uena
borgb to Ike fiaaad. Tetogrtme to Spo
kane Falle for the teeervriloa of a berth
oe aeectlon from that point to the Hound,
to 1« occupied from North Yakima, he
qucolly receive no attention whatever.
Ladle* who are kerely aide to eland the
trip under the Most favoralde circum
stances are rnmpriteil to spend the night
la a day coach and at this reason of the
year such hardships are aid to result la
[ serious consequence*. The local travel
. between Pasco and Tacoma la so great
that the placing of another “ sleeper" on
the road would be a matter of no incon
tiderable profit to the company for H
would ha constantly filled and would re
run in many mote taking atrip that la
now abandoned on account of its hard
ship#.
ughlattas TSwagh Csawimitmsl
Rssciawsu.
Kditob HaaALo:—l thought wa hod
on election la May lor datapln to a con
•tUntioatl convention, botrioce tb«gath
ering of the clam It wem. to ran In tho
way of a btftl.tu.-e lnotca.l of a consti
tutional oowvoolku,.
My undemanding (sad I think it is
tha MUM with nine tooths of tho mien of
tho territory) la that tho man wa toot
there won to giro no a cooatltotioa em
bracing nothing man than rales of gov
ernment that wera tally tried sad estab
lished, aad would not bo likely to hare
to he changed, hot instead of thet it tp
peon to he the dsoln to make a com
plete code of laws and a gnat many of
them tried and doubtful experiments.
Why can’t that body of men sent then to
form a constitution profit by the exper
ience of some of tha older state, end
avoid aa tar as puoeible the insertion of ar
bitrary provisions which may give gnat
trouble to get rid of after n trial. It
should ho remembered that it It tome-
Umca vary bard to chaago a consti
tution and to insert a lot of principals
that an not folly aad fairly established
into it would he l very risky business aad
therefore it isheat to make tha organic
law of only well defined principles for the
guidance of law making powera, and an
pecially la arold mandatory prorloioos,
which might be good enough jam now but
after s time become very obnoxious tad
opneaMve. II tt la found after a while
that then are aoue necessary peoviaiou
left out it would he eery stay to have
them inserted.
Thera are at least half a dosan states
that ara trying to gat rid of constitutional
provisions which have proven detrimen
tal to their welfare. The precautions
which ara takan to insure the stability of
the constitution make it a matter of diffi
culty to get rid of unpopular portions of
tt. And all state* have found tt danger
ous to legislate through constitutional en
actments. Provide a sets aad conserva
tive basis of legislation and avoid nsurp
ing legislative functions. We do not
want municipalities deprived of the right
to borrow money for public improvements.
We do not want the constitution to estab
lish onr laws on irrigation lor that is a
principal that is not thoroughly worked
out yet. We do not want our school
j land held perpetually by the state. We
do not want lien laws entered in the con
stitution, for the principle is not well de
fined yet and changes are necessary from
time to time until it is fully settled.
The Northern Pacific Railroad Com
pany would love to have a constitutional
provision restricting municipalities from
goiag in debt or granting any subsidies;
that would perpetuate its monopoly in
this, our county.
It might be well for the members of the
convention to consider that there will he
men fifty years in the future whe will
have as good judgment as any we have
now for making law# and ran have profit
ed by their experiences. Fabxkb.
Trackers* luwlmUm,
Notice is hereby given that a teachers’
examination will be held at the court
house North Yakima, August 14, begin
ning at 9 o'clock a. m. Ike members of
the examining board are J. G. Lawrence,
W. E. Lawrence aad Hilda A. Engdabl.
Hilda A. Emdahl.
td County School Superintendent.
James Averill and the notorious “Cat
tle Kate” Maxwell worn lynched, on
Sweetwater river, Wyoming, teat Run
day night by the neighboring cattlemen
aad ranchers who could no longer brook
the branding of their yearlings by this
remarkable pair. “Cattle Kate” it will
be remembered added to her notoriety a
short time siacc by riding into a gam
bling house possessing herself of the
money in the faro hank, deepening the
gamblers and burning the saloon.
Chaa. C. Grant, a men well-known
about Spokane Falls, aad formerly pro
prietor of the Kitchen at that
place, was murdered at Tacoma on Fri
day teat by one David Martin, hia room
mate. Grant was the poeewns of sev
eral thousand dollars, which he carried
with him. Martin entered Great’s room
and attempted to possess himself of the
mooes, when Gnat awoke aad resisted.
Martin then struck him over the head
with a along-shot, and subsequently shot
him through the neck, the wound being
immediately fatal. Martin then grabbed
the money end stopped. Martin was
captured Wednesday at Kalama.
—Mg line ol stoves at coat corn# rarly
Vining A Bilg*r>.
—gabber how all slaw at coat at Vin
ing A Bilgir'e on acntwnt flf removal sale.
—Money to loan in any aiaouma, on ap
proved wonrity. by B. Wrohach. North
Yakima. If
—Ladien' Silk niltto, rolwol from 50c.
n pair to 25c —<loo’t mice thin opportunity
-at the Onto I-X-L. •
-Penooe Jaririag tnneportatioo .Unit
the dty or vicinity can bn aocumaiodaMd
by leevlng ocdcci at Allen A Chnpamn'a
tor Staaton'a back line. t(
—Go anil examine thoec llcgent gold
vatchae at Itedfleld's. They an dairies
and*, cheap! Betnetnbcc, Iber an war-1
noted m ry prevented of no trade.
- Bert bold flcoc . wilt not be nadenold
in anything—dry good*. clothing, fornlnh
lag goods, bocte and short, hata and cppVi
omckny, xroorice. and in (act everything
kept in • flrst-Haer etof*. •
MilfMt TU List
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- 1 " 5:: $
“ 4 44 4 ao .37
44 5 44 20 .37
44 6 44 30 .37
44 7 44 30 37
. '• 8 44 SB.. .... 'J7
* 9 44 30 37
44 10 44 30 .37
44 11 44 99 37
“ 12 44 30 .37
44 I 44 21 37
44 2 44 21 .37
44 S 44 21 37
44 4 44 21 37
44 6 44 31 .27
44 « 44 21 37
44 7 44 21 .87
44 8 44 21 .37
44 9 44 21 .37
44 10 44 21 .37
44 11 44 tl *7
44 12 44 21 .37
44 I 44 22 .37
44 2 44 22 .37
44 3 44 22 37
44 4 44 22 37
44 6 44 22 .37
44 •« 44 23 r 37
44 7 44 22 .37
44 8 44 22 .37
44 9 44 22 87
44 10 44 22 .37
44 .11 44 22 37
44 12 44 22 37
44 I 44 2 8 .37
44 2 44 23 .37
44 3 44 23 .37
44 4 44 28 37
44 5 44 28 37
44 « 44 23 37
44 7 44 21 .37
44 8 44 23 37
44 9 44 28 .37
44 10 44 23 87
“ 11 44 23 87
44 12 44 23 37
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44 3 44 24! .■!!'. .37
44 4 44 24 .37
44 5 44 24 .37
44 « 44 24 37
44 7 44 24 .37
44 8 44 24 87
44 9 44 24 37
44 10 44 24 .37
“ ll 44 24 .37
44 12 44 24 37
Lot 1, block 25 .87
” 2» ” 25 .37
” 3. 44 25 .37
” 4, 44 25 .87
44 5, 44 52 87
44 7, 44 25 37
” 8, 44 25 37
44 9, 44 25 37
” 10, 44 25 37
” 11, 44 25 87
” 12, 44 25 .37
Lot 11a Moca IS
44 3 44 » .87
44 « 44 M 87
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“ 1, “ 37 .37
“ 3, “ 37 37
“ 3, ** 37 37
“ 4, “ 37 37
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“ 7, “ 37 37
“ 8, f 37 37
“ 9. M 87 37
“ 10, “37 37
“11. “37 -7
“If, “38 .37
“ 1. “ 38 .37
“ f, “ 88 37
“ 9, “ 38 |7
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“ 8, “ 38...... .37
ii I ii I
Lot 9. blk 58... * 07
£ 10, "S3 87
"11, 14 38. y
"12 38- - - .37
1, " 39 - - - .37
"2, H 39 - - - - .37
S. " 39 - - - .37
” 4, ” 39- - - - .37
’’ 6, " » 37
H «. ”39 37
” 7, ” 39 , 37
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“ 4, ” 40 37
”8. ”40 .87
” *. ” 40 .37
” 7. " 40 .37
” », ” 40 87
”9, ” 40 37
”10. ” 40 jej
”11. ”40 37
”12. ”40 37
North Yakima—Huaon's add,
lot 11. blk 129 . 1.40
”12, ”1» 1.40
” 3, ” 110 1.40
North Yakima—
Lot 5. blk 50 5.75
” 0. ” 50 5.76
” 1«, ” 51 6.75
”1», ” 51 5.75
”29, " 51 5.75
"30, ” 51 5.75
” V. ” 52 6.76
”10, ” 52 5.75
”11. ” 52 5.75
”12, ” 52 5.75
”28, ”52 6.75
”29, ” 52 6.76
”30, ” 52 5.75
”31, ” 52 5.75
” ”62 7.03
” 8. ” 85 2.38
” 9, ” 85 SM
” I, ■ ” 87 2.36
” 2, ” 87 1.40
” 3, ” 87 1.40
” 4, ” 87 1.40
”11, ” 87 1.40
”W, ” 87 1.40 j
”1«, ” 91 2.36'
” i 3, 44 207 l.« 0:
“ "tit 3.71
" 7, 44 234 140
“ 8. 44 234 2.36
” SI, ” 51 6.75
”32, ” 5/ 5.75
“ 7, 44 208 1.40
“ 8, 44 208 2.36
“ 5, 44 85 /.40
“ 6, 44 85 1.40
” 7, ” 85 1.40
”15. ”106 i.40
“ 6, 44 209 i.40
44 1, 44 208 2.36
44 2 44 228 1.40
”14, " 86 1.40
”11, ” 86 1.40
44 38. 44 20 5.70
44 1, 44 27 2J6
44 2, 44 27 /.40
44 3, 44 27 i.40
44 11, 44 25 i.40
44 4, 44 i 2 5.75
44 3, 44 70 6.75
44 4, 44 70 6.75
44 7, 44 71 6.75
44 8. 44 71 6.75 i
44 K, "71 5.75 ,
44 19, 44 71 6.76 ,
44 3i, 44 71 5.75 ,
44 32, 44 7/ 7.03 i
44 5, 44 /37 1.40
44 6, 44 137 1.40
44 7, 44 137 i.40
44 8, 44 127 2.36 ,
44 J3, 44 /27 1.40
” 14, * 127 1.40 !
”16, ” i 27 1.40
” i 6, ” i 27 2.36
”27, ” SO 5.75
44 3, 44 12 5.76
44 25, 44 II 6.75
”36, ”11 5.75
” i 4, ” 1/ 5.75
”15, ” 1/ 5.75
”19. ”10 6.75
”21, ”70 6.75
lot 6, ” 10 5.75
"24. ” 9 5.76
” 4, ” 6 1.40
” 5, ” 6 1.40 |
44 6, 44 6 1.40
” 0, ” 8 6.76
”10, ” 8 6.75
”11, ” 8 6.75
”12, ” 8 6.75
”18, ” 8 6.75
"14. ” 8 5.76
” 16, ” 8 5.75
”16, ” 8 7.02
”25, ” « 6.75
” 38, ” 8 5.75
” 88. " 9 5.76
”27, ” 9 5.75
” 9, ” 25 2.36
”10, ”25 1.40
” BU. ” 29 5.75
” 18, ” 3) 5,75
” 5, ”47 . 1.40
44 6, ”47 . 1.40
” 13, ” 67 . 1.40
” 14, ” 67 1.40
” 7. " 88 1.40
”12, ” i 29 1.40
44 2, ” 8 1.40
of swjtfssc 14, two 13, r 18,
40 acres 0.76
n X of iwJig ne*rf, sac 34, twp 18,
rifle. 20 seres 5.04
ii Umber ad to Yakima city .62
Lo?6, blk 17 ” " ” ” !ao
H *.”17" 39
" 9," 17“ 39
” 10, ” e “ 39
" 1,” IT" , . . .39
M 2. M 17“ 39
all of '* 18“ . . . . ,96
U* 8 “ 17 “ .39
•X " » •« 82
n£ "96 “ .02
n* " 17 “ 02
mk "V “ . . .48
nwW ’• 88 “ . . . .46
IWM “28 “ . . .46
nstf “28 “ 46
•X “ » “ 82
■H “ 29 “ 82
lot 2, “31 “ . .82
“ 3, “ 31 “ 62
“ 4, “ 31 39
“ 5, “ 31 “ .39
“ 6, “ 31 “ • .39
“ 7, “ 31 “ 39
'/ ». '* 31 •• :k»
” 9, “ 31 “ 38
” 10, “ 31 “ 38
as qr of sac three, tptwelve, range
sixteen, one hundred and sixty
acres j.47
nw qr of sw qr of sec nv«, tp
twelve, ransixteen. forty acres 1.09
ne qr of aw qr of mo eleven, tp
twelve, r seventeen, forty arvw 1.U9
nw qr of aw qr mc three, tp thir
teen, r seventeen, tortv acres... I.n»
nw qr of nw qr eec eleven, tp
thirteen, r seventeen, fbrty acres 1.09
w M of ne qr A se qr of ne qr see
three, tp fourteen, r seventeen,
one hundred and tweotv acres.. 2.67
w bf of nw qr, nw qr of sw qr 4
ne qv of aw qr seu thlrty-qpa. tp
fifteen, r seventeen, one hundred
sad sixty tores 3.47
nw qr of nw qr eso thirty-three,
tp sixteen, r seventeen, forty
acres 1.09
sw qr sec nine, tp thirteen, range
eighteen, one handled sod sixty
acres.; ,3.47
neqrofnwqr As hfof seqr sec
three, to fourteen, reighteJ. one
hundred and twenty acto. I.Of)
n hf df nw qr sec twenty-nine, tp
fourteen, r eighteen, eighty acres i.ag
7 eighteen, eighty am* I.KB
7 nw qr, ne qr AeLiof se or nee
’ I thlrtv-five.tp fourteen, r eighteen,
7 four hundml acres g.m
7 whfofnw ur aec twenty-one, tp
7 thirteen, r nineteen, eighty acres I.hs
nw qr of ee qr me iwenty-eeven.
7 tp thirteen, r nineteen, forty acre* 1.09
7 j mw qr of nw qr nee tliirtyune, tp
7; fourteen, r nineteen, forty acre*. 1.09
7 1 ahfofaw nr hot fifteen, tpeleven,
7 r twenty, eighty acres 1.88
7j w balof nw qr Aneqrofsw qr it
! lota one, two A three aec thirty
7| one, tp eleven, r twenty-one— I.HB
I I aw qr aec aeventcen. tp eight, r
f twenty-five, one hundred and
r eixtv acrea.. 3.47
n hf of aec twenty-one, tp eight,
r twenty-five, three hundml and
twenty acres ti.«s
a hf of aoqr of aec fifteen,tpaev *n,
r twenty-six, eighty acres 1.88
e hi of sec aqyen, tp eight, r twen
ty-seven, three hundml and
twenty acres 6.fiS
ne qr of see twenty-five, tp eight,
r twenty-seven, one hundml and
sixty acres 3.47
i seqr A lots one and two, hoc
i thirty-five, tp nine, r twenty-nine f».04
e hf of se qr sec seventeen, tp
seven, range thirty, eighty acres 1.88
a hf of ne qr and a hf sec twenty
seven, tp seven, r thirty, four
hundred acres H. 19
w hf of sec thirty-three, tp seven,
r thirty, three hundred and
twenty acrea «.63
s hf sec thirty-one, tp eight, r
thirty, three hundred and twenty
acrea fi.gs
VanSyckle. Oscar—Lots one, two A
three, blk twenty-four, Yakima
City, Lauber's add, commencing
eleven chains north of sw corner
of ne qr of se qr of aec five, tp
twelve, range nineteen, and from
them* north twenty-one rods,
thence east twenty-three A onc
hatf rods, thence south twenty
one rods, thence west twenty-three
and one-half rods to beginning,
sec five, tp twelve, range nine
teen, three acres 124.26
White. O W—YakimaCity, Barker's
add, block two, and lots one, two,
three A (our in blk nine, and lots
four A five in blk ten 21.90
' Wilson, W T—Lots three and (our,
1 sec eighteen, tp twelve, range
I sixteen, sixty-five acres 20.01
1 Whelan A Coeger—Yakima City,
Geo W Goodwin’s add, lot six,
block three 2.08
Wood. C. E. 8. - North Yak Ibis. Huson's
Addition. l>ot 4, Block 149 93 IS j
Lot S In Blpek 149 1 40 I
“7 " 144 1 40
“ « “ 140 m
“ft “ 161 , 140 ]
“ « “■ 1M 1 40
“7 “ 161 1 40
“8 “ Iftl 2 «S I
“I “ 170 2 »'
“2 - ITS 1 401
“3 “ 1» 1 401
“4 “ ITS 140
“0 “ ITS 3 OS
“M “ MB 1 40
“11 " ITS 1 40
“ 12 “ ITO 1 40
“I “ 171 2 IS
“2 “ 171 1 40
“ S “ 171 1 40
“4 “ 171 1 40
“6 “ 171 1 40
“6 “ 171 1 40
1 hereby certify that the above and foregoing
U the delinquent tax list. to*ether with a
description of the land* to be *old and the name*
of the supposed owner*, with the total amount*
due from each perron. D. K. I.EHII,
Sheriff and Ex Officio Tax Collector of Yakima
County. W. T.
—The Gnwt I-X-L Co. arc agent* tor
Butterkk Pattern Co. *
MASON’S OPERA HOUSE,
Tuesday. J~ laly 30.
FIRST PRESENTATION IN YAKIMA OF
AXX4. WIId.IAM JT. GILMOHIiTW
Grand Spectacular Triumph,
ITWELVE TEMPTATIONS.
Rewritten aid Revised bj Chas. R. Tale.
The Bcencry by (Iris, Mem Ac Bell. Costumes by Bn I she of Union.
nspertlM by Hams * C*., Undsn. ( snpanf comprising «* pcsplr.
Fumsus Premlrrrc. Asiawndlng nyrrialtlr*.^
TkW European Ballet Troupe m
“The Policeman and the Flirts,”
“The Ballet of the Nations,”
“The Ballet of the Live Cockatoos.’”
—and the —
GRANDEST OTIS EIV SCENE
EVER CONSTRUCTED.
t T) v - v TtiPPßfffw' m f
SALE OF SEATS COMMENCES
at -AJ.l©n &c Oliapman’a
Saturday, July «T.
At trim hr Itb bcwtant ifl b MriMeJ m anti Mm;
Gallery, $1; Parquette, $1.50.
WOTII'K IOH n MMt tT'UV.
I U. s. Lamp orrtca At Vostm Yakima, W. T
July 21, lass. |
{ IJKFOKK Till: HON. R MUSTEK AMI RE
IIJ eslvcr of (be I. S. IbMrlct Land Office.
1 ApfHration of Acgldlu* -lunger. HUhup u( Die
Dloceae <>f Mmiiially of the Roman Catholic
( Church, for a Patent ui the (’nited state* to lanue
to ■aid Aeeldln* Junaer and hi* aucceMora in
uffire a* Mhlioim of the |il»imc of Manually of
«ld Koiuhu Catholic Church, for the land* em
braced In the nald St. Joseph Catholic Mi-alon
Claim, the imn« Im*lok In Yakima County afore
aald, and In Hie Jurisdiction of said PUtriel
Laud Office and within the JurUdh lion of the
! Dtoeeae of Manually of the Roman Catholic
Chnrrh.
.W. Rglhy. that I. A raid Iu» Ju osier. Roman
CatfcuUc Rialiop of the Dlocem-of Ninoually (of
the Roman Catholic church) In Waohlnrtou Ter
ritory, do hereby wake application a> ■ueb
liiahop to the Hon. Register and Receiver of Hid
District I -and office, to prove my rlsht a« Bishop
of Hid Diocese of the Roman catholic Chnrrh
and of my werroon In office to the tract of laud
herein deacrlhed a* that certain minion ciuliu,
commonly known a* the S». Joseph catholic
MUaiou Claim, In Yakima County, Washington
Territory: That Mid application and claim is
made under and by \ irtue of the Acta, aforeuid.
of the Congress of the Cntted Staten of A usual
M. IMS and March 2.1 A.5, and the rlsht* therein
and thereby conferred and vealed.
The land* claimed by me. the raid Acsldin*
lunger, Hiabop a* aforvuaid, tains ami more par
ticularly deacrlhed a* follow*, to-wit: Hcgin
nlns at m point on the north bank <m the Abtau
um River in Section Eighteen (la), Township
Twalva (U) North of Range Seventeen (17) East
of the Willamette Meridian, In Yakima County,
W. T.. <7 cliaina south of the quarter ««s tlon cor
ner on a line between Section* 7 and la. and
runplns theuce north «7 chain*; thence wcat
90 chains; thence aonth a - , chain*; theme west
M chain* to a point « chain* *ontb of the quar
ter nee! (on comer on line hetweeu Sections 12
and 13, In Township 12. North of Range IS. Ka*t
of Willamette Meridian; thence *onth JO chain*;
thence west *0 chain* to the west boundary line
of Hid Section IS; thence »»uth on Mid weat
boundary line of Mid Section IS to the north
bank of uld Ablanura River, and thence hr the
meander* of the uld Ahtanum River down
atream on the north bank to the place of twin
ning, containing Four Hundred and Seventy-
Hvcn (477) acrea, more or leu.
“ vs**/ wre vr iv«.
I hereby give notice of ray intention to make
proof and to establish the rbdin of the aaid
Roman Catholic Church In and t«» the laud em
braced In the M. Joseph Catholic Mission claim,
by proving the occupation and h«v of the name
by the Father* of uld Church for mlsslnuary
purposes a* provided lu raid Art* »o a* to entitle
a patent to Issue therefor from the Culled stater
to me. Aegtdlus J linger, and my rncccsaorr In
©dice. a* Bishops of life Diocese of Nlsquullv, in
tm*t. for the use*. pnrpoae* and l>encflt of the
Roman Catholic Church: raid proof to lie made
before the Hon. Register and Receiver of the
United state* District land Office at North Yak
ima. Washington Territory, on the I'Jth day of
September, ISW*. at 9 o'clock of that day, by the
; testimony of the following witnesses, to-wit;
Eugene Caslmere < hlonise and l/nils Joseph
D'Herliomex. of New Westminster. British fol
urobia: Howard Crate. o| The Dalles city,
state of Oregon; Napoleon Mcoilllvary, of the
City of Vancouver. Washington Territory; Peter
i 11. Fox, of the city of Astoria. Mate of Oregon;
Webster 1.. .Stabler. Anthony llerke and Daniel
l.ynrb, of North Yakima, Washington Territory;
Andrew Oerval*. of Yakins City, Washington
I Territory; and Indian Eneas and Indian .
.of Hlmeoc, Yakima County, Washington
Territory, and documentary evidence to be sub
mitted on the hearing o( the matter.
AKtJinil H JI'NOKR.
jylft «t Bishop of the Diocese of Nlsqually.
IRA M. BRUTE. Register.
NMDr Far Fnltllrallsiu
I. AND Orriu AT Nokth Yakima. W. T.,f
July 24, UN. i
"VTOTICE Is hereby given that the following-
IT named settler has (lied notice of his inten
tion to make Anal proof In support of his claim,
and that said proof w 111 he road - before Register
and Receiver of U. 8. laud oflW at North Yak
ima, W. T., on September 14,18», vlr:
GEO ROE KKIt,
Of Moxee, W. T.. who made D. 8. No. BUB for the
NE«4 of Bec. 10. Tw n. |g, north of Range 21 east.
He naascs the following wltneaaM to prove his
continuous residence upon and cultivation of
Mid land, vix; George White. B. A. Tuning,
bane. C. v. Hyland and James Grover, all o
Moxee. Washington Territory
Any person who desire* to protest against
the allowance of surh proof, or who know* any
substantial reason, under the law and regular
tlons of the Interior Department, why such
proof should not bo allowed, will be given an
opportunity at ihe above mentioned time and
place to cross examine the witnesses of said
claimant, and to offer evidence In rebuttal of
that submitted by claimant.
jy'Jfi6t 'HA M. KHUT/.. Register.

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