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The labor journal. (Everett, Wash.) 1909-1976, April 15, 1909, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085620/1909-04-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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"A labor papat is a far bettor
advertising method than any ordin
ary newspaper in com pa risen with
circulation. A labor paper for ex
ample, hairing l.'hOO subscribers is
of nion' value to the. business man
who advertises in it than ordinary
papers with in.txx) subscribe™."
VOL. XIX
Everett's largest and most com
plete HOME FURNISHING
Establishment solicites your
patronage on the broad basis
of-
"Courteous Treatment,
Prompt Service and
Best Values Obtainable"
We trust all — Deliver goods.
Charged prepaid and guaran
tee satisfaction or your money
back.
Barron Furniture Co.
2815-17 Colby Aye., Everett
MURRAY'S SHOE STORE
Union Made Shoes
For the Whole Family
Ask For
Huiskamp Bros. Shoes
For Women and Children
Ask For
Brennan Shoes
For Men
MURRAY'S SHOE STORE
1707 HEWITT AYE. Phones; Ind. 299Y, Sunset 1162.
Call for them
Have You Tried the
Wm. Biackman
Cigar
It is an ideal UNION MADE cigar, as good as tho name.
UNION MADE SHOES
A. J. BATES SHOES
$3.00, $3.50 and $4.00.
KNEELANDS SHOES
$4.00 and $5.00.
Alden Walker & Wilde Shoes
$3.50, $4.00 and $5.00
STACY ADAMS SHOES
$6.00.
UNION MADE WORK SHOES
$2.50 and $3.00
Home Shoe Store
"Owned in Everett"
R. E. BROWN R. W. MANNING
THE LABOR JOURNAL
The Official Paper of the Everett Trades Council
The
Largest
Stock of
UNION-MADE
SHOES
in Everett
DEVOTED TO THE INTEREST
KVERETT, WASHINGTON, THURSDAY, APRIL 15, 190!)
WHERE YOU SHOULD
SPEND YOVH MONEY
Every Dollar You Spend With These Mer
chants Boosts This Paper.
h may be unethical to talk "shop"
through the news columns of a paper)
but necessity and ethics do not always
travel well together. This is addressed
in you, Mr. union man, We are going
tn ask several favoea of you and the
first one is that you read every word of
this article. When you have finished,
we think you will agree that wo are
justified iii making this direct appeal
In you. We are linn believers that the
iiest way to obtain support from the
I pic un anj proposition is to tell
them iii plain Words what you want.
and why jmi want it.
We are) going to ask you to patronize
as much as you can, the advertisers who
use the Columns of this paper. And we
are going to give you a few reasons why
it is tn your interest to do sn.
You demonstrated by the magnificent
response to our appeal for subscriptions.
you gave when we took the management
of the .Journal, that you wanted a labot
paper to remain in the field. We are
trying to show our appreciation of that
support in the quality ot' the reading
matter we give you.
\'o paper ran exist, alone on subscrip
tion. It must havq'live advertising. You
have made it possible for ns to prove ti>
our advertisers that the Journal is a
good advertising medium, because it
reaches the working people of the city.
We wanl i" hold these advertisers and
I lii— ran be done it they begin to sec
tangible result- from their investment
In thfl, shape nf increased patronage. Dn
you begin tn see the point? The bus
iness man likes to know where his
money does him the most good and it' he
knows that you patronise him because he
advertises in this paper he is going to
eon-dor it a good investment,
Another thing: No unfair firm will
he allowed to advertise in this paper.
Many of our advertisers make a spe
cialty of union-made goods and take
pains to attract your attention to them.
Yon may -ay it is strictly a matter of
business with them. Probably it is to
a certain extent. Dollars and cents is
the stimulating factor ill nearly every
thing. You organize I" maintain and
increase if possible, your daily wages.
Mut the very fact that they are fair to
organized labor and talk the merit of
their goods to you through the medium
of your publication, untitles them to your
consideration. It doesn't cost much to
mention the Jburnal to your merchant
and to mention our advertsers to your
friends.
We publish below a list of the persons
and firms who advertise in the Journal.
It will pay you to look this list over.
It will help the merchants and help us
to keep the Journal on the firing line.
And we'll all he happy.
No -pirit of criticism actuate- us in
pennng thrtse line-. lust a desire to
show you in concrete form how you can
aid your paper. The union people are
not really indifferent to any phase of
the union movement. Hut in the worn
and work incident to the grinding out of
a living, they don't study these things
out. And that is why we have seen
tit to depart from the usual order of
thing- in the new- columns of this pa
piy; to bring the matter of boosting
and supporting the publication that
-lands for your welfare to your at
tention in a few plain words.
Head this list of wide awake busl
lies- people that want your trade.
FURNITURE AND HOUSE FURNISH.
INGS
Barron Purnture Co.. $815-17 Colby.
White a Baokett, 2914 Rockefeller.
BOOTS AND SHOES
Murray's Slim- Store. 1707 lle.witt.
Home Shoe Store. IMS Hewitt.
E. '/... the Shoeman, Hewitt.
.Mm Goldthorpe, ims Broadway,
TEAS, COFFEES AND SPICES
Imperial Tea Co.. 1407 Hewitt.
CIGARS AND TOBACCO
Win Hafcrkorn. 1681 Hewitt
GROCERIES
Ridgeway Grocery Co., 1318 Hewitt.
W. F, Hall. Colby.
BANKING
Hank of Commerce. 1700 Hewitt.
Kverett Trust 4 Savings Co., corner
Hewitt ami Colby.
OF ORGANIZED LABOR
TRANSFER AND BAGGAGE
Northern Transfer Co., 2f130 llrond
way.
I nion ["ransfer < o„ corner Grand and
t alifornin,
GENTS' FURNISHINGS
Eager & desdahl, 1618 Hewitt
Edward Wahl, mo? Hewitt
Boston Clothing Co., Dorchester bldg.
PAINT AND PAPER
Huh Wall Paper Co., 2S-J'i Rockefeller.]
Glob* Wall Paper Co., 1.">1., Hewitt. :
Dobbs Wall Paper ami Paint Co., 29331
Colby,
(I. McAllister, 2314 Hewitt.
DRY GOODS
W. P. Hall Dry Goods Co., Colb) Bldg.
Chicago Outfitting Co., i in; Hewitt.
SPORTING GOODS
A. A. Baily, Ism Hewitt.
MILLINERY
Miss M. Johnson, 1717',. Hewitt.
TAILORING
The Broadway Cleaning Parlors, 283V/ t
Broadway.
P. Wagner. 2004 Hewitt.
•I. 1.. Morrow . -_»!Mi7 How it i.
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Re|iance Realty Co., \l*S'> Colby.
Hudson & Booth. Scandia Hank Bldg.
John Mcßae, Fobes Blk,
Huhsaker & Rogers. 1717 Hewitt.
FLORAL AND SEED
W. Wftllmark, 1916".. Hewitt.
PHOTOGRAPHS
Brush Studio. 2801 Wetmore,
PRINTING
News Publishing Co.. Rockefell
or.
THEATRICAL
(■ and Theat re.
Kcenio Theatre.
Dreamland Theat re.
OPICAL
Everett Optical Co., 1914 Hewitt.
TIN AND SHEET IRON
Andrew Eckstrom, i2sip Cedar.
Broadway Sheet Metal Works. 293S
Broadway.
PLUMBING
Il c. Brown, i:>>\ Hewitt.
LIQUORS
Everett Brewing Co.. 35th and Paine.
Viaduct Saloon. -Jl lii Hewitt.
TONSORIAL
Everett Hath-. jvJl Wetmore,
UMBRELLAS
Foley's Umbrella store. 1807 Hewitt.
COAL AND WOOD
\. c. Little Fuel Co., corner Pacific
and Virginia.
ABSTRACTING
Snohomish County Vbstrnct Co.. Wet-J
nion- Aye. 1
UNDERTAKING AND EMBALMING
.b in I-'. Jerrend 2939 Broadway.
K. B. Chatlaeombe, 2818 Rockefeller.
LIGHT AND POWER
Evfcretl Rj*., Light ,V Water Co.
WIRELESS WONDERS
About seventeen years ago the Wis
nurd of Menlo Park star led the, world
by carrying on telegraphic communica
tion between a moving train and sta
tions along the railroad without any
wire connection therewith, The system
employed was to mount a hoard covered
with tinfoil edgewise mi tin- oar roof.
Tin- tinfoil formed pari of a local tele
graph circuit, which inductively affected
the telegraph wires that paralleled the
bract, ami in this way the messages
wcte made to "lean" from the train to
the telegraph lines. The recent experi
ments .on the l,ake Shore Railroad
where messages were exchanged between
an operator on a fast-moving train and
operators in Toledo, KlMuirt. and Chi
(•gal were of a different character; that
in. the Hertzian waves wore used, which
transmitted the messages directly to the
receiving stations, ami not to the tele
gra|*i wires along the track. The vnl
tie oi such coniniunicat ion between trains
and railway stations was illu.-trated at
the very outset of tl xperiments. On
one of the train- a truck broke nt
sonic distance from Chicago, and hy
means of wireless telegraphy a repair
trait was called from Elkhart. —Scientif
ie American.
EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES
FLEECE WORKINGMEN
Legitimacy of the Business Destroyed by a
Few Rapacious Men.
The fe. employment office privately
operated for private gain i- fact becom
ing a public nuisance, which is stating
the ease very mildly. The employment
office should he. and. in some eases, is.
a happy medium, between tin- working
man "nut uf a job" and the employer
"shy nf help." But human vultures
have seen in this business a chance tn
skin the laborer neatly and artistically
with the chance nf punishment reduced
tn a minimum and are fast crowding
deecnt, honest men nut nf the business.
There seems tn he no way tn reach
them. Test eases of city ordinances
regulating them have been taken to the
courts and the hackneyed word "tin
■ constitutional" invoked successfully to
beat the workingman.
Stories have been told from time to time
about the methods used to rob the job
seekers and they have been more than
mere ruinois. Cut it is a different mat
ter to get the men who have been fleec
ed to take legal -tops to defend them
! sehes. There i- no doubt that charges
of "extortion" or "obtaining money
under False pretenses" could la brought
ami proven ii the average workingman
did not fear the courts worse than he
fears anything else. And that is the
secret oi tin- employment man's graft.
He know, that only men who are in
I tight circumstances as -\ rule, turn to the
j employment office- for a job. He knows
j further that they will lose'their dollar
ior two they have paid to him rather
than complain to the authorities. And
he uses ths knowledge to his own pe
cuniary profit.
I'll.- write: lias heard many stories
from the men themselves of the treat
ment they have received. Only last
week a laborer came to the Journal
office and told the following story. He
had paid .Sl.."it) to a Seattle employment
office for a job near Snohomish. A re
ceipt for his money was given to him
and a. letter to the Lumberman's Em
ployment office of this city, the pro
prietors of which wen-e to <o\\il him out!
to the job. ile was blunth told that I
there was no such job for him. He
then asked that the lee be returned to 1
him. This was refused. The proprietor
then asked the man for his receipt or
ticket from the Seattle office and upon
receiving it threw it in the stove.
the laborer wanted to know what he
could do. The writer sent him to chief,
Marshall to whom he told the same
story. The chief was impressed with
the straight, forwardness of the man's
story and sent him to prosecuting At
torney Hell. Mr. Roll refused to prose
cute the case, claiming lack of corrobor
ative evidence.
Thi- is only one of the many, many

mst auces that have conic under the ob
; -t nation of the police department. Chief
Marshall has had continual trouble with
the owner of thj employment office and
a short time ago was given the promise
of the member* of the city council that
they would refuse to Issue trim a li
I ecus,.. When it same t<> a showdown
councilman Philips wa* the only man
(who stood pat for the interest of the
working people. An opinion by the city
attorney that they could not refuse thi
application for a license stampeded them
like a flock of sheep.
And the tortuous twis'tings of a law
that compels the city council to issue a
Ilicense to a man that will outrage all
i sense of decency and justice is beyond
i the understanding of anybody but a
i; law yer.
It his been -aid ninny times, although
J it might he difficult to prove the us-er
tiim. that a Systematic game is worked
between a great many employment of
fices and mill foremen or yard Superin
tendent*. According to stories told by
'laboring lmfi. this is how the game is'
worked: A foreman sends to an em
ploymeut on ice for men. The men pay
their dollar and are sent to the job.:
They work two or three days and are
laid off and the foremen sends to the
agency («>r another batch. This process
continues lartaf laltal/ ami Mm money
(utid to the agencies for the jobs is
w%aah.nl up. HYw of tlio iiaaan of the
phut* of this practice know ahout
it or would count franco it.
Manx foremen are above such
ilc-picahlf methods of fattening their
The merchant who does not ad
vertise at all may or may not bo
your friend, fellow-worker, but it is
ii foregone conclusion that he who
libera 11 v patronizes the columns of
all other papers and refuses to ad
vertise in the labor paper, is not
looking for the workingman'a pat
ronage, does not wish it, nnd is not
desirous of your friendship.
I hank accounts, hut it is undoubtedly
true that enough of them do work the
game to make it a lucrative proposl
t ion.
It is a common habit nf unscrupu
lous employment agencies tn advertise
jobs that never existed and sell the same
job in a half dozen different men. As
was stated before in this article, only
men at the lowest ebb financially or
strangers in a strange land, who do not
| know where tn turn tn look for work,
will patronize these offices. What can
he mure mean or conteinptuoua than
tn fatten like a vulture off the; neces
sities nl a laboring man.
A state license law for employment
agencies would protect the honest man
in that business and thank Heaven
there are some such men—and give tlio
authorities power to discipline the dis
honest ones or put them out of husi
tioss. Tiio recent legislature refused to
give us tins law. They could madly
squander the people's money in extrava
gant appropriations lint it wasn't worth
while to proteel the humble laboring
man who is down and out andatthe, mercy
ol' these gentry.
For the man who honestly engages in
thi- business ami conducts it in a squsvre
manner, we have no reproach. It is the
aluise of the business that needs correc
tion. If there is no law
mi tin- statute hooks that will remedy
evils, and in the absence of such law no
step- can in- legally taken to curb their
capacity, then public opinion must step
in and do what the law cannot. Pub
lic opinion, properly eoncetat rated, pan
force these people to be good or go out
of busness. They should not be allow
ed to fleece tin- working people of their
hard earned money and if nothing else
will serve, the la-h of public -corn must
be brought into use.
RECENT APPOINTMENTS
PORTLAND, <>>~.. April 22, The For
est, Service ha- just announced the fol
low im; appointments on National For
ests in Washington and Oregon dis
tricts:
Guy P, smith, assistant foresl ranger
on the Washington national forest:
Sherman A. Brown, Earl Abbott, Carl
M. Ewing, and Games tl. Looney, as
sistant forest ranger on the l-'retn, -it
national forest; Martin .1. Gribble, Clar
ence 1.. Benson, F. W. Stalman, Marion
Burlingame, O. s. Callison, George Led
ford and ti. M. Talmage, assistant for
est rangers on the Oregon national for
est.
Theodore K. Cadle has been restored
to dot\ on the Fremont natonal forest)
Deputy Forest Hanger John li. Sena
cal and Assistant Forest Ranger, Roj E.
Thomas, who have been on furlough have
been restored to duty on the Oregon
national forest; -lame- Allen, assistant
forest ranger, who has been attending
the ranger's course at the, diversity
of Washington, ha- been restored to
duty on the Washington national for
est.
The resignation of Maurice Hamilton,
assistant finest ranger on the Washing
ton national forest has been accepted.
WOULD HELP SOME
Atioriuw I), c. Lewis oi BelHnghara
i- endeavoring to sec If it is not poaal
hie to lut\e a clause inserted in the
coining tariff hill to the effect that any
manufacturing plant that pays for hon
est and capable help less than two doll
ars per day or that employs Asiatic la
bor shall not n ive the benefits of
the taritl law Every labor paper in
the United States ought to clip this item
and -tart the ball rolling.
Mr. Lewi- says he fully realizes there
is no power or authority vested in eon
gre-- to saj what rate of wages wage
earner- -hall receive, but doc- think
.•ongro-- Ma find -mile Va]f out of the
difficult} by Saying who can have the
benefits of the law and who cannot.
He nl-o -a\- there ought to be some
penally attach)*! to factories receiving
the benefit- ut the law that close down
iu-t to squeeze the laboring men into
submission. Maple Kalis Leader.
No. 14.

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