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The labor journal. (Everett, Wash.) 1909-1976, April 15, 1909, Image 2

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085620/1909-04-15/ed-1/seq-2/

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The Labor Journal.
I'l BLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
Labor Temple, Everett, Wash.
Entered at the Post Office in Everett.
Washington, as second class Mail Mat
ter,
E. P. MARSH Editor.
J, E. CAMPBELL.. .Business Manager.
Phones Sunset 148, Ind. 881 Y.
Subscription $LOO Per fear In Advance.
Advertising Hates on Application.
UNION DIRECTORY
Jf-
American Federation of Labor.
Samuel Oompers President.
James Duncan First Vice President.
John Mitchell Second Vice President.
.lames O't fennel..Third Vice President.
Max Mollis Fourth Vice President.
Dennis A. Hayes..Fifth Vice President.
\\ m. 1). Huber Sixth Vice President.
Jos. E. Valentine.Eighth Vice President.
John B. Lennon Treasurer.
Frank Morrison Secretary.
Washington State Federation of Labor.
President -- C. R. Case,
Seattle.
First Vice President Fred Hudson,
Bellingham.
Second Vice President.-Thos. Maloney.
Spokane.
Third Vice President L, F. Clarke.
Walla Walla.
Fourth Vice President._H. A. Livermore.
Hoquiam.
Fifth Vice President W. .1. Bradford,
Tajji una.
sixth Vice President Jas. Durham.
Raventdale.
Seventh Vice President—J. E. Campbell,
Everett.
See.-Treas Chas. P. Taylor,
Tacoma.
Organizer C. 0. Young,
Tacoma.
Eveictt Trades Council.
A. I{. Garner President.
das. Ballew Vice President.
>V. .r. Fox Treasurer.
li. F. Straka Secretary.
E. P. .Marsh Reading Clerk.
Thole who have been fortunate
enough to view the scene* in the Chi-
cago "wheat pit" will never forget it. A
boiling, seething caldron of human be
ings fighting like wolves for the elus
ive dollar. Gambling on futures, .some-
thing that never will exist as far as
they are roneenufl, the coming wheat
crop. They never owned a stalk of
grain, perhaps some of them never saw
a wheat field. A rumor spreads through
the "pit" that Europe will call heavily
.'it us for wheat. The crop in the Ar-
gcntine Republic promises to be a fail
ure. Government forecasts predict a
shortage in our crop These rumors fly
Murk and fast and the "shorts," the
men who have sold wheat for future
lelivery and haven't got it, hush mad
ly for cover. Someone has heftn quiet
ly cornering wheat and he proceeds to 1
squeeze the ''shorts" who must deliver
chat they have sold "lu-n it is called
for or go into bankruptcy. So the price
of wheat mounts to the skies. What
hie- ir matter, if the farmej-s profit by-
Two thousand miles away from the
"wheat pit" ot Chicago lives an army of
nun and women who must buy that
wheat to main!, in life. They work in
mill, and factories, in store and work
-hop. anywhere they can find employ
ment. The most ot them are unskilled
laborers, receiving barely enough wages
.0 keep body and soul together. Every
one in the family must labor. The hoy
■ r girl who should be in - hool is placed
:n 'he mill or factory. They dare not
l< a lay. 1 ley are trying to pay for
a little home for that is the hope of
every man to have a roof over his head
thai be may call his own. They have
to count their pennies for five cemts
'.' !- on a sack of Hour nn-ans that
there 1- something they need tliat they
niii-t go without foi their payments
must 1,.- met. I lour has been raised
t" |1,70 a is k .uid the average mill
hand receives from $1.75 to $2.00 per
day. Ask him how far a sack of flour
es among a family of five.
Now. flour isn't really worth a penny
a -a. k more than it was two years ago.
Wage- are leas. We have scarcely
emerged from .1 money panic that
brought idleness to the workers. Why
then should the workers pay tribute on
one or the main necessities of life, flour?
'1 he humiliating answer seems to be
thai a group of men 8000 milaj away
who toil nor -pin not" who never pro-
duced ■ dollar* worth of wealth, may
satiate their gambling instincts. It is
just gambling pure and simple, legiti-
matized by public consent. Whether it
is in the wheat pit of Chicago or on Wall
street, in V V. City, it is just the same.
\ whole nation suffers the consequences.
rha common people pays the price by
the sweat of their brow They always
pay.
IVe are often Mmaad of bring unrea
•ouable in our dennda of being arrog
ant and tyrannous and trouble breeders.
Our accuser- seldom are fair enough ,
to try tn as-crtain what these demands,'
GRAND THEATRE
Ind. "Phone -MIX. ISOtl Hewitt Aye.
"The House of High-Class Entertainment.
ENTIRE CHANGE OF PROGRAM
SUNDAYS-TUESDAYS-FRIDAYS
Continuous Performances, Admission lOcts
really are. however. John Mitchell in a
tew wolds sums up tho wants of the
people when he says:
"Tin- American workman wants an
eight-hour day. He wants n half holi
day on Saturday. He wnnts a Sunday
of rest and recreation. Ho wants a
home. He wants comfortable surround
ings. He wants an income sufficient to
clothe his family and feed them. He
wants to educate his children. And
aside from that he wants an income
which, with reasonable frugality, will
be enough to provide, for maintaining
him in sickness and old age."
There is nothing very awful about
that, is there? Nothing that any fair
minded man could deny is right ami
just. Academically the mont avari
cious employer of labor admits its all
right but when the power of organisa
tion is invoked to bring these things
about, he finds his toes tramped on nnd
lets out a yell about the "arrogant de
mands of labor."
"There ate rascals in the union." Yes.
also in the churches, yet we still admire
tun- piety and reverence (tie Christian
religion. Rascals have been known to
creep into fraternal soceitles, yet we
freely acktiowledke the uplifting power
of the great fraternal orders. Bad men
have found their way into every known
form of human activity since the world
began, and will probably continue to do
SO while the world stands. We would
be ignorant, indeed, to condemn the
whole human race because a part of it
was evil. You must not condemn the
union because t hern are "rascals in
it."
The union people of the "City of Des
tiny" have launched a weekly news
paper named the Tacoma Labor Advo
cate, the first copy of which is upon our
desk. The name of C. I). Ball appears
as publisher and he has given to the
unions of that city a paper of which
they nave reason to be pround. Taco
ma has long needed a fearless publica
t ion to uphold the cause ami
we congratulate- our fellow unionists on
w. o. w.
Carnival
Queen Contest
Is open for all contest-
ants. Anyone desiring to
enter the contest can
make application to Mr.
Fred Buell, 2916 Colby
Aye. Contestant secur
ing the greatest number
of votes will receive a
$350.00 piano.
Candidates for Queen
are now:
Miss Hazel Campbell.
Miss Julia Moody.
Miss Tillie Freeman.
Everett Paint. Paper & Art Co.
Kverett Taint. Paper A Art tV
Come and
LOOK!
atourWALLPAPER
2808 COLBY AYE.
Ind. 66X, Phones:
Kverett Paint, Paper & Art Co.
-SEE—
Hunsaker k Rogers
I 717 Hewitt Aye.
FOR BONDS OF ALL KINDS
Fire Marine and Liability Insur
ance. Heal Estate and Rentals.
Phone 145.
i
the successful launching of their publica
tlon.
The office boy will 'bury his grand
mother" daily for the next sj\ months.
The business man will put a "back in
tin- morning" sign on his desk each af
ternoon. Politics, war scare, everything
will now be forgotten in one mad rush
lo the ball park, where pennants will be
won and lost. This will happen every
where, but in Kverett. Our people will
take theirs from the score board at the
cigar stand.
Carryng n paid up card does not ful
fill your mum obligations, Therrt is
mi efficacy in a mere piece of paper;
ii must lie backed up by a clear under
standing of one's duty towards his fel
lows and a will and purpose to carry it
out.
Koch der School Board; Us nnd God!
Taken from the opera "the people be
ll d" now being sung by the Everett school
direct ol's.
EVERETT
TRADES
COUNCIL
The Trades Council met In regular ses
sion last Wednesday evening with a fair
attendance of delegates.
Dan Werner, of the Cooks' & Waiter-,
W. ('. Hall, of the Laundry Workers and
l oin ODea, of the t igni makers' were
obligated ami -rjnted as delegates. Com
munication from C. I!. Case, outlining
proposed mass meetings throughout the
state to discuss labor legislation, as
handled by the late legislature was read
and ordered filed.
The fait that then- v\a- a Japanese
restaurant hen- and that Japanese were
etnployed in the largest hotel in the
city was brought forcibly to the atten
tion of the delegates and they were re
quested to urge upon the members of
the various unions thai all Asiatic labor
was obnoxious to organized labor, and
it was their duty to use all law ful means
towards making this a white man's coun
t ry.
The matter ot' forming a sectional
Trades Council was laid on the table.
The Cooks' & Waiters' reported that
all differences between their local and
the Virginia hotel had been adjusted
and by motion the house was ordered
removed from the hoard and from the
Trades Council unfair list, published in
the Labor Journal.
Peports by unions:
Shingle Weavers, 2 initiations. I ap
plication.
Cigar Makers, 1 by card.
Laundry Workers, 1 application, I in
itiation.
Painters, ,'t initiations. 5 applications,
Engineers, 1 application
Carpenters, 1 by card.
Look at the number on the meat. If
it is 224, pass it up.
The city of Budapest lias a miws tele*
phone service with which news items,
music, etc., are transmitted to the var
ious subscribers. At about nine o'clock
in the morning a buzzer is sounded for
about fifteen seconds, after which t'te
correct time la nnnounced. Then the
subscriber is told the programme of the
day, which is carried out on n tine
schedule, Fust therq are stock
tions and news items; then the parlia
mentary news, closing prices of stocks,
th ,* weather forecast, etc. Towards eve
ning the subscribers can listen to muiic
at the cafes or gardens, and in the eve
ning to the Royal Opera or one of the
theatres. The service costs $7.lf] nj|
year. -Scientific American.
Kverett faint. Paper & Art Co.
.Tin M Stokes Bldg. Notary Public
WM. SHELLER '
Lawyer
Sunset Phone 204 EVERETT,
Independent I'hone 257 X. WASH.
Sun. 1959
THE LABOR JOURNAL
NEWS A LA MODE
THE ONLY WAY
TThe grange and t he labor unions -hould
drop all other lastMS and pledge (audi
dates for the next legislature absolute
ly, definitely and literally to pass the
referendum and initiative. Of course if
they do not want it had enough to
go for it to the exclusion of everything
else, they may not deserve to have it.
There is no other way. Portland Labor
I'ress.
FOR Tl N AND
SHEET IRON WORK
CALL
ANDREW ECKSTROM
Union Shop.
Ind. -iI7Z Sunset :?86.
2819 Cedar Street.
Plumbing
Gas, Steam and Hot Water
Fitting, Jobbing Promptly
Attended to. :
Phones Sunset 1222; Ind. 104 X
H. C. Brown
2521 Hewitt Aye. EVERETT
J. L. MORROW
THE TAILOR
FULL LINE OF WOOLENS CAR-
RIED
Cleaning and Pressing.
2907 Hewitt Aye.,
E - Z,
the-
SHOEMAN
Ralston $4.00
Union Miut*
Fellowcraft $3.50
Union /V\ade
Nettleton $6.00
THE BROADWAY
Cleaning and Pressing Parlors
4 Suits Pressed and Sponged for
$2.00.
SUITS MADE TO ORDER
Absolute Satisfaction Guaran
teed in Every Respect.
2937V 2 Broadway, Phone Ind. 45Y.
H. G. Swalwell. Richard Cary. W. N. Riley
Reliance Realty Co.
(Watch for the Red Pennant.)
FARM and CITY PROPERTY
Insurance and Rentals.
We have a long list ol' homes
that can Ixi bought on small pay
ments.
2823 Colby Both Phones 752.
UNFAIR LIST
MITCHELL HOTEL, Barber shop.
Bar and Cafe.
C. R. SCHWEITZER, Plumber.
WAHLGREN ELECTRIC CO.
MODERN PLUMBING & HEAT
ING CO.
R. Springer, of Springer's Bazaar,
1313 Hewitt avenue.
Warehouse foot of California
street.
P. Sampson, cohtractor.
CARPENTERS -J. M. Harris, D.
Jardine, C. J. Hand, Piatt, Pad
dock, Ridgeway, Wold (House)
1402 Grand.
PAINTERS — John Engblom.
Thos. J. Mort, r. E. Merrifleld,
J. W. Moon-. V. Hunt.
PLASTERERS —W. A. Allyn,
W'illaril, C. Wheeler, A.E.Wright.
Booth.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS- Thos.
Storrey.
AMERICAN PILE DRIVING CO.
BARBER S—Wm. Whittaker,
Lowell.
MEATS- i'hi at ens Pac king Com
pany.
Meal .Market at 2006 Hewitt. All
meat with Gov. stamp No 224
la uut'air.
By order EVERETT TRADES
COCNCIL.
Everett.
Men's half soles, sewed or nailed
75 cents
()'Sullivan Kubber heels
40 cents
Canvas gloves 4 pair 25c
70c per doz. Full line men's sox
John Goldthorpe, Prop.
Phone Ind. 731
2938 Broadway Aye.
See that the union label i- -cued in
your hnthnnd.
If its Right the
'Boston"
sells it
The "BOSTON" is the home of all the besl
union-made lines of clothing nnd Hats. Brother
hood Gloves', Keystone Overalls, Cones Overalls,
Pants and Shirts are here Por you. The "Boston"
is for Men, Younß .Men and Boys.
The Boston Clothing Co.
"WHERE THE GOOD CLOTHES COME FROM"
Taints. Oils, Class. Brushes, Pictures, training. Moulding, Screen Doors,
Window Screens'.
"Strictly Union Shop"
Telephones: Sunset 1221, Ind. 197 X. Res. Ind. 474, Sun. 601.
ESTIMATES GIVEN ON PAPERING AND PAINTING
Cut Flowers and Floral Designs, Flowering Plants, Seeds,
Bulbs and All Kinds of Shrubs and Nursery Stock.
City floral and Seed Co.
W. WALLMARK, Prop. •
Salesroom and Office: 1916% Hewitt Aye. (Opposite Mitchell Hotel.)
Greenhouse: Cor. 43rd and Broadway.
Rates Reasonable. Goods Delivered.
Salesroom, Sunset 100'J; Ind. 758 V Greenhouse, Independent 137 X
WE LEAD while others follow
FOR FINE PHOTOS
Tbe Brusb studio
2801 Wetmore. Phone 700.
Thursday, April 15, 1909.
Wall Paper Co.
N. T. NASLUND, Prop.
282fl Rockefeller Aye.
EVERETT, WASH.
C. A. Hudson, Scandia Bank W. R. Booth.
Building.
Hudson & Booth
Timber Lands, Logged Off Lands
Real Estate, Insurance and Loans.
Phont Sunset 102.
CONSULT US ABOUT YOUR EYE
TROUBLE
We don't |>r<>Hcril><- glasses unless you
neeil them. We make our own glasses
ami sell I loon at moderate ,-ost, nml
guarantee tlieni.
EVERETT OPTICAL CO.
EVERETT.
1914 Hewitt \\r
Everett, Wash.

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