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The labor journal. (Everett, Wash.) 1909-1976, March 20, 1914, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085620/1914-03-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE LABOR JOURNAL
Official Organ of the Trades
Souncil, is read by the laboring
kn and women of Everett.
VOL. XXIV.
COMPLETE MEN'S AND BOYS' STORE
Mechanic's Clothes
Union Made for Union Men
This store's particular pride in supplying the working
men with the .best made garments is shown by the increased
business we enjoy in this line.
SHIRTS, MACKINAWS, HOSE, CAPS, LOGGER SHOES,
WORK SHOES, CRUISERS' SHOES, WATER-PROOF SHOES
Fully warranted to fulfill all requirements to your entire
satisfaction.
(See our lines before buying anywhere)
The Brodeck Co.
1701-3 Hewitt Aye.
CARHART AND BOSS OF THE ROAD OVERALLS
Savings Made and Deposited
With this strong hank regularly means not only 4 per cent interest
added to the amount, but a fund from which expenses can be paid
later for
EDUCATION, TRAVEL, BUSINESS OR ADVERSITY
Money never outgrows its usefulness, so keep saving and deposit
ing it with this bank.
BANK OF COMMERCE
4 Per Cent on Time and Saving Deposits
Riley-Cooley Shoe Co.
FULL LINE OF UNION MADE SHOES
Both Phones 766
Klein Distributing Company, Inc.
J. F. KLEIN, Prop.
Agency for
ITALIAN SWISS COLONY WINES, PORT, SHERRY, MUS
CAT, ANGELICA
From $1.00 to $3.00 Per Gallon
Our Brandies are from the Italian Swiss Colony made of the Purest
of Madera Grapes.
Our leading brands of whiskey are Edgewood, Barbee, Yellow
stone, Harper, Sunnybrook and Burclay "76" and our brand —
"LITTLE OLD FASHION WHISKEY"
Delivery to any Part of the City S. S. 385 —PHONES —Ind. 636
COR. HEWITT AND OAKES EVERETT, WABH.
NORTHERN TRANSFER CO.
Office and Storage Warehouse Across from Great Northern Freight Deaet
Suaset 191, lad. Sos
Mr. Union Man:
Stop and Think!
Do you buy everything you can that is UNION MADE?
We sell everything that is to be had that 's Union Made.
Bachelder & Corneil
BETTER CLOTHES—UNION MADE
Those old daugerretoypes of grand
'it her and grandmother and Aunt
Mary and mother taken Just after the
war—and then the quaint pictures of
father —money wouldn't buy them
[Cor. Wetmore
from YOU. Are you forgetful of the
fact that future generations will cher
ish such pictures o you? Photograph
er B. J. Brush. 218-19 Healty Bldg —
Adv.
The Labor Journal
SEVEN SISTERS
CAMPAIGN ON
PETITIONS ARE OUT AND CIR
CULATORS WILL BEGIN
WORK IN EVERETT—FED
ERAL MEDIATOR FAILS TO
SETTLE LOCAL TROUBLE.
The Universal Eight Hour League
sounded the sentiment of the voters of
Seattle on the question of an eight
hour day when circulators secured 22,
--000 signatures at the polling places on
city election clay. And forty precincts
were not canvassed at all because of
a lack of circulators. The people have
made up their minds to try out this
thing called direct legislation, despite
the warnings of the State Employers'
Association. It will not be as easy a
task to get the signatures for the
Seven Sisters because of the multiplic
ity of the measures and the necessity
of going more or less into explanation
of their purport. Everybody knew
what the eight-hour bill was and were
either for or against it. Argument
wasn't necessary. The Seven Sisters
will require systematic organization of
our union and grange forces and we
ought to be terribly busy right now.
What are the unions In your locality
doing? The blank petitions are being
distributed now from our Seattle head
quarters and the campaign must be
pushed energetically to a successful
conclusion. An hour or two each
evening in your own neighborhood
where you are acquainted will turn
the trick. Go to your campaign com
mittee and enlist for this campaign.
If you have a friend outside the labor
movement who is interested and will
take a petition around, mail his or her
name and address to our headquarters,
1518 Sixteenth Aye. N„ Seattle, Wash.
See that your friends are registered.
AND DO IT NOW!
For the first time in the history of
this state the federal government has
taken a hand in bringing about an
amicable adjustment of an industrial
|dispute. T. W. Boyce, an agent of the
Bureau of Mediation and Conciliation
attached to the Department of Labor,
was sent at the request of organized
labor to Raymond and Everett to ad
i just if possible the trouble between
mill owners and employes in those lo
calities. After two days continuous
conference in Raymond a settlement
was reached agreeable to both sides
and virutally the. conditions obtaining
prior to the lockout were restored.
There will be no further discrimina
tion against union men, and, in the
two mills operating with scabs, the
men employed at the time of the strike
will be re-employed as fast as open
ings can be made for them. In place
of shop stewards a committee from
the union will in future take up with
the management any dispute that may
arise. These are the terms of settle
ment which the daily press distorted
into a complete victory for the mill
men. We are perfectly willing they
should have that kind of a "victory."
In Everett the government agent
could do nothing, the Robinson Co.
taking the Insolent attitude that it had
"nothing to arbitrate." NOTHING TO
ARBITRATE when, the company de
liberately discharged its men for no
other reason than that they had as
serted their right to organize. This
"public-be-damned" attitude of some of
our large employers of labor may tide
them for awhile but cannot stand
much longer against a changing pub
lic sentiment. "Upon what meat hath
this our Caesar fed that he hath grown
so great?"
1712 Hewitt
A prominent mill owner in this state
is very hitter against the Democratic,
administration "May fire and pestil
ence, (amine and drouth, sweep this
United States from border to border as
long as the Democrats remain in
power." lie exclaimed to a group of
friends the other day while discussing
the "free tolls" question which is agi
tating congress. And he has done his
little bit towards bringing about this
calamitous situation. His plant, which
employs two hundred or more men
when running nominally, has been
idle for several months. Of course It
was market conditions that kept his
plant closed and not a desire to be an
instrument of vengeance on the Demo
cratic party. Hut he stands for a type
of men that care no more whether the
working people as a class sink or
swim, survive or perish, than does a
wooden Indian cigar sign. I honestly
believe that this little old United
States would get on just as well if we
had a few industries less managed by
that type of men ]■:. P, MARSH.
have: you signed seven sisters?
THE OFFICIAL PAPER OF THE EVERETT TRADES COUNCIL
EVERETT, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 1914.
HI GILL TELLS BUSINESS MEN
WHY HE IS MAYOR.
The following is an extract from a
speech by Hi Gill, given in his honor
by the business men of Seattle at the
New Washington hotel last Monday
evening:
"You business men," said he, "he
you banker, merchant or what not,
you must realize that as political af
fairs stand today, you are one and the
same with the poor laundress. You
are. one and she is one on the ballot,
and perhaps she has this advantage
over you, that she can vote her hus
band and you cannot vote your wife.
"In the last ten years there has
worked a revolution in the political
affairs of this country greater than
the French revolution, though not one
drop of blood was shed, t hat revolu
tion left you, Mr. Business Man, with
one vote, no matter how great your
business may be, while the little busi
ness man in Green Lake, whose trade
amounts to but $2.75 a day, is your
political equal inasmuch as he has one
vote.
"You have not come to see this yet.
You did not see it in the last election.
But I did and that is why I am mayor."
MERCANTILE CONFERENCE.
The Industrial Welfare Commission,
at a meeting held on March 10 and 11,
has set a date for a formal convention
for the purpose of establishing the
minimum wage for women employes
in mercantile industries of the state.
The date set is Tuesday. March 31, at
9 a. m„ and the place of meeting will
be the senate chamber, in Olympia.
Following is a list of the delegates
chosen to this important convention:
Representing the employers are J. L.
Paine, Spokane Dry Goods Co., Spo
kane; Edward D. Frederick, Frederick
& Nelson, Seattle; George J. Wolff,
Aberdeen, Wash.
Those selected to represent the em- \
ployes are Mrs. E. Mulr, care Chris
toff erson's store, Taconia; Mrs. Flor
ence Dock, care Rhodes Bros., Seattle: i
Miss Mayme Smith, care Wonder
store, Spokane.
The public will be represented by
Prof. W. G. Reach, University of
Washington, Seattle; Mrs Frances Ax
tell, nellingham; Mr. .1 D. Fletcher,
Fletcher & Evans, Taconia.
LABOR NOTES FROM THE WHAT THE LABEL MEANS TO
CAPITOL. THE UNION SHOP.
The state factory inspectors were in
session March 14 and Pi, and among i
various matters considered a determi
nation has been reached to standard
izo all safeguards. The labor commis
sioner called the com cation in the
matter of Organizing safety commit
tees in the mills of the different parts
of the state.
The stute labor commission* r made i
a flying trip to Bverett Friday after
noon and had a conference with Conn- 1
ty Prosecuting Attorney Faussett to <
see what could be done in a legal way
towards preventing the mill owners
from discriminating against organized t
labor. The question tit issue having
arisen through an Ultimatum delivered
by the employers declaring against the t
employment of any ono> wearing a 1
union button. Prosecuting Attorney I
Faussett has consented to act on the 1
evidence submitted to Iti in. jt
ARE YOU IN THIS FELLOW'S CLASS?
Trades Council
The Trades Council held its regular
session last Friday evening with Presi
dent Smith in the chair.
Communication received from Kern
County Labor Council of Bakerafield,
Cal., asking for information as to the
attitude of the mills here toward union
labor In this city and promising sup
port from that section. Secretary in- ]
Btructed to notify California body as to
local conditions in mills.
Communication was received from
the Building Trades Council notifying
the Trades Council that it had con
curred in the action of placing the
Robinson Manufacturing company on
the unfair list.
Communication received from Seat
tle Central Council regarding the
eight-hour initiative petitions.
Brewery Workers —One initiation
and levied a 25-cent assesment on its
membership for the Michigan strikers.
Bartenders —Two initiations.
Machinists —Voted on machinists'
home proposition and eight-hour day;
[endrosed eight-hour dya.
Molders —One by card.
Plumbers —One application.
Painters —Two applications.
Teamsters —Four initiations.
Label League—Two initiations and
held grocery shower last week at the
home of Mrs, M. T. Alliman for the
benefit of the Striking Teamsters. Ten
members were present and three large
boxes of groceries were donated.
"If I were to give you an orange,"
said Judge Foote of Topeka to D. O.
McCray, "I would say, 'I give you the
orange'; but would the transaction be
entrusted to a lawyer to be put into
writing, he would adopt this form:
"I hereby give, grant and convey to
you all my interest, right, title and ad
vantage of and in said orange, together
with its rind, skin, juice, pulp and pits,
and all rights and advantages therein,
with full power to bite, suck or other
wise eat the same, or give away all or,
any part thereof, with or without the!
rind, skin, juice, pulp or pits, anything
hereinbefore, or in any other deed or'
deeds, instrument of tiny nature or
kind whatsoever to the contrary not
withstanding.' "
Promotes good citizenship
It elevates the standard of labor.
It abolishes unsanitary conditions
It protects the home and fosters fam
ily ties.
It forbids conditions which endanger
the health of the community.
It improves tho environment of those
who labor, thereby enhancing the
quality of citizenship.
It is hostile to the system of child
labor and is a factor in keeping chil
dren of school age out of the work
shop.
If you want the union shop, boom
the label.
Sam Allen, who recently underwent
an operation at Providence hospital,
has recovered to the extent that he
WM able to leave the above institution
last. Hrother Allen is still confined |
to his home but is doing nicely.
LEGAL LANGUAGE
Mention the Journal to every
merchant who solicits your pat
ronage through these columns.
SION ON INDUSTRIAL
RELATIONS.
Collective bargaining, conciliation
and arbitration as means of adjusting
differences between employer and em
ploye will be considered at the first
formal public hearing in Washington
of the United States Commision on In
dustrial Relations. The hearing will
begin Monday, April 6.
i Corporation officials and trades un
ion leaders who have negotiated and
", maintained trade agreements in five
of the nation's largest industries will
be called to testify.
The commission hopes to elicit in
formation that will disclose to what
extent improvement in industrial re
lations might be expected from the
general adoption of such agreements
in other industries.
The hearing will include systematic
efforts at peaceable settlement of dis
putes in the coal mining industry, the
railroads, the clothing industry, the
printing trades, the building trades
and the molders' trade.
At least two representative employes
and two representative union officials
in each industry have been asked to
testify. The list of witnesses will be
made public In a few days.
One session of the hearing will be
devoted to each of the five trades, and
the hearing will close with the testi
mony of witnesses whose experience or
study have been along broad, general
lines.
Among the trade agreements about
which detailed information will be
solicited are the agreements in the
anthracite and bituminous coal min
ing industries, the agreement that ex
isted for several years in the building
trades of New York City, various
agreements in the clothing industry of
New York City and Chicago, and sim
ilar agreements in the printing trades
and the molders' trade.
STRENGTHEN YOUR ORGANI
ZATION.
The writer has noticed from time
to time for the last twenty years the
efforts of those within and without the
ranks of organized labor to strengthen
their position. We must expect those
not within the ranks to organize those
of their class in an effort to defeat
the aims of organized labor. They do
not take the union people into con
sideration In any way whatever
Labor's needs, labor's dues, is nothing
to them Kven your right to wear the
emblem of the organization which has
made it possible for you to get the
conditions under which you work at
pre tent is denied you. Now we ha\e
a remedy for this evil The bulk of
the money spent is spent by those
who work for a living. Why not use
your head and remember those who
have to be fought by organized labor,
or those who take a stand with the
one who fight the cause of organized
labor. Then give your patronage to
those whom yon know are favorable j
to your cause Buy only UNION
MADE goods, and by so doing you j
will not only strengthen your own or-1
aanization, but be fulfilling your ohli \
Batten. This remedy carried on for a
[icriod of about ninety days by alii
members of unions In Kv*r«tt, w, be
H*T% would lessen the membership
n the organizations which have been
'ormed to fight the cause of labor
unions UNION SECRETARY
THE LABOR JOURNAL
LABOR TEMPLE
PLANS DRAWN
SKETCH OF PROPOSED BUILD
ING MAY BE SEEN AT THE
LABOR TEMPLE — ACTUAL
CONSTRUCTION NOW UP TO
THE UNIONS
We want a new Labor Temple in
this berg and we want it bad. The
present structure is deteriorating in
value every year and is no longer suit
able to the needs of our growing labor
movement. Like a suit of clothes that
were once serviceable but have been
outgrown and worn out, the present
building has served us well for many
years, but ought to give way to a new
and modern building. We have ex
pended a good deal of hot air on this
subject in the last few years and have
gone so far as to purchase and pay for
iwo sightly lots in a desirable busi
ness location, but that is all we have
done. One union, the Timber Work
ers, is right up against the proposition
now of being compelled to seek other
quarters, although they have over two
thousand dollars tied up in the stock
'of the Building Association. There is
i not a hall in the present, building large
enough to hold the crowd that attends
the weekly meetings and the union has
1 been compelled to rent Liberty hall in
; which to hold the same.
The directors of the association
have earnestly discussed plans for get
ting the new building under way and
it is up to the union people of this city
to say whether or not plans under way
shall materialize or not. Building plans
have been submitted and are now on
display in the Labor Temple. They
show a modern building taking up the
entire ground area of the two lots,
with either two or three stories and
basement. The plans provide for one
entire floor serving as an auditorium
suitable for any kind of public gather
ing and if built as planned would sur
pass anything we now have in the city.
The approximate cost of such a build
ing as planned, completed and fur
nished, ranges from $20,000 to $30,000
Plans are thoroughly modern, includ
ing the latest thing in lighting, heat
ing, etc. Both large and small meet
ing halls, reading room, ladies' rest
rooms, spacious ante and reception
rooms, kitchen, banquet hall, offices,
etc. If the project is carried out, and
,U Can be. it will assure to Everett un
ionists a spacious, beautiful home, the
equal of anything of its kind in the
West and a good revenue producer.
The big consideration is the raising
of funds and this entails concerted"
action on the part of the union peo
ple of Everett. Most of the building
trades unions have signified their
willingness to do most of the labor
and take stock in the association in
return, so the bulk of the Immediate
cash outlay would have to be for con
struction material and furnishings At
least fifty per cent of the labor cost
could probably be paid in stock, the
stock issued and called in the future
from the earnings of the building
A reincorporation will of course be
necessary and new stock issued in
both common and preferred form. The
preferred stock is interest bearing and
may be purchased by a union or by any
individual, whether a member of a
Union or not. Preferred stock in a"
building such as planned wmtld con
stitute a gilt-edge investment. Com
mon stock is dividend bearing but not
interest bearing, and can be held only
by union members in trust for their
organizations.
The Wednesday in April all the
stockholders of the association will
| hold a me. ting to discuss proposed
building plans and go into the project
in detail In the meantime every union
lin the city ought to take this matter
tip as a special order of business in
order that the stockholders when they
meet next month will have an id. a of
what the unions will do. Come in dur
ing the week and see the plans. Talk
the project over and try and inject
some enthusiasm into your neighbor
on the subject We ll never have a
new building in ninety nine yean un
less wt do somettiiiiL more than talk
•b<Wt it. If business and industrial
conditions are normal in this city dur
tng the Coming year, and the future
point! that way, wr can get the Tem
ple under vaj W. can do it if the
unions all get together on the proposi
tion and stay with it.
If you arc a good union man you
will see to it that each article of
your wearing apparel bears the
label.
Xo. (i.

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