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The labor journal. (Everett, Wash.) 1909-1976, April 16, 1915, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085620/1915-04-16/ed-1/seq-3/

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Friday, April 16, 1915.
TRADE ON ROCKEFELLER AND SAVE MONEY
Sale of Pretty W*sh Dresses
For Little Ladies 2 to 14 Years Old
10 doz. pretty Wash dresses, in
fine ginghams, percales, linens,
etc.,; values run from $1.00 to
$2.00 each, size;, 0 to
14 years. Sale piice..
SALE OF PRETTY
-35c WASH GOODS 23c
Beautiiul new Wash Goods in
printed voiles, Rici voiles, prim -
ed organdies and pretty silk
mixtures, worth 35c.
Sale price
15c PRINTED CREPES 12' 2 c
27-in. fancy printed Crepes,
white ground with floral design;
worth 15 cents.
Sale price
Mililnery Department is showing new Hats daily at $3.50, $4.00, $5.00
DOLSON & SMITH
THE STORE AROUND THE CORNER ON ROCKEFELLER AYE.
Every Season—We're Selling
More Hosiery--There's a Reason
MORE AND MORE WOMEN ARE CONSTANTLY COMING BACK TO
STONE-FISHER'S TO BUY HOSE "THE SAME AS BEFORE"
FOR THEMSELVES, THEIR HUSBANDS AND CHILDREN
THE REASONS ARE' A VAST ASORTMENT COVERING THE
PARTICULAR REQUIREMENTS OF EVERYONE, AND SU
PERIOR WORTH AT POPULAR PRICES, BEGINNING
AT 12 1-2 CENTS
STONE-FISHEK CO.
GARSTENS
PACKING COMPANY
Wholesale and Retail Fresh and Salt
U. S. Government Inspected
2820 Colby Aye.
Broadway Theatre
Do you know that no better program is to be seen
than in shown at Broadway Theatre at any price?
Monday and Tuesday of each weak you see the Semi-Weekly Pathe Nws,
with all the Current Events, and RUNAWAY JUNK, which was a part of the
Star program w hen we took it over.
Wednesday and Thursday of each week you see PERILS OF PAULINE
IN FOUR PARTS, featuring MISS PEARL WHITE AND CRANE WILBUR,
both stars, and on Friday, Saturday and Sunday of each week you will SEE
some good up-to-date drama, with SCENIC and EDUCATIONAL features.
These are part of the weekly program ol the CLEMMER In Seattle.
WE SAY again, no better program is to he seen in the city at any price.
We ask you to follow our program for one week, and then you will bo fully
convinced that our claim is based on facts.
Admission Only CENTS
PHONE 831
FOR YOUR WOOD SUPPLY NOW
Mill Planers Bark Slab, Block
H. W. SHAW
1609 Hewitt Avenue
Be Sure and ask for "S. # H." Green Stumps
Subscribe for The Labor Journal
The Paper That Stands for the Interests of the Workers
FILL OUT THIS BLANK
Enclosed find one dollar | $1.001 for one year's sub
scription to The Labor Journal,
Street Ad rest
City
State
10 doz. pretty Wash Dresses, in
ginghams, percales, etc, sizes 2
to 6 end 6 to 14 years; values
75c to $1.00. Sale
pi i; I
ASH DRESS GOODS
25c WASH GOODS 19c
Pretty new check Ratine, em
broidered crepes, also novel-
i v si rlpes; 27 in. wide;
25c value. Sale price....
23c
-T in. plain colored Ratine, col
ors white, blue mixed, tan mix
ed and lavender mixed; worth
12ic
23 (cuts. Sale »
price
MEATS
50c
19c
23c RATINE 15c.
15c
Both Phones 21
ON PICKET DUTY
(By Jay Fox)
What the Wise Gazaboes Said
Some years ago, when the question
of industrial unionism had become a
matter of serious discussion, the
opinion was held by many wise gaza
boes that the trade unions would
never consent to a change of form.
"As they were made so will they re
main till the capitalist system or the
'new unionism' sweeps them out of
existence," said the guy with the far
seeing eye.
"Look," said he, "at the army of
meal ticket artists who are deeply
entrenched in the offices of the old
unions; do you think they are going
to sit idly by and see their fat jobs
slip out from under them? For in
dustrial unionism means fewer un
ions, and fewer unions means fewer
officers. Therefore the officers are
going to 'wield all the power at their
command to the end that the caft
unions remain craft unions to tbe end
of time."
Choice Chunks of I. W. W. Wisdom
There were still others who sat In
their wisdom seats and handed out
the following chunks of folly to their
fanatical followers: "The old unions
are baked hard in their present form
they are crystalized and cannot
change their form no more than the
leopard can change his spots.
"The A. F. of L. was organized with
the aid of Mark Hanna and other
thieving employers. The craft union
has fulfilled its mission, —if it ever
had one —and must disappear. Those
who try to prepetuate it are the deep
est reactionaries, even thougli they
call themselves socialists, anarchists
or syndicalists. The craft union fost
ers strife and division among the
workers. It fails to conform in any
way to the development of produc
tion and exchange. It stands in the
way of progress and forms a bulwork
for capitalism. Those who hold that
craft unions will develop into indus
trial unions are ignorant of his
tory. There is no record of an or
ganization that has developed In that
manner."
Creating the One Big Noise
Fed upon that kind of mental alf
alfa for a while the radical element
In the labor world was ready to start
a "real" union, which indeed It did
amidst a flourish of trumpets in Chi
cago, in 1905. There was DeLeon,
Debs, Haywood, St John and a bunch
of other theorists,- all of one mind—■
that the A. F. of L. was a dead one
and only needed some one to come
around and bury it. Indeed many of
those present at the convention
thought that they were really attend
ing the funeral of the A. F. of L.,
"After we got this whirlwind ablow
ing" they said, meaning the I. W. W„
"the decrepit old Federation will just
have to go and make a coffin for
itself."
The I. W. W. was born in a storm
of oratory, each speech more fiery
than its predecessor, and all directed
at the A. F. of L. The I. W. W. was
a big noise to start with, and sound
is its principal ingredient to this day.
If the 1 3ise Is dying down it is only
because the number of its megafones
are getting fewer. As an organizer
of the working class It has been an
utter failure, and it is my conviction
that the workers as a whole are all
the better for that.
Workers Too Wise to Join
In the first place it is a dual or
ganization and its success would have
brought about the very evil Its pre
moters said it was destined to abol
ish. The strife that would arise be
tween it and the A. F. of L. did not
succeed in getting any great number
of the workers to join it, would have
been tremendous in its bitterness and
Intensity, and would result In the
greatest setback the organized labor
movement has ever had. But the
workers have wisely refused to join
it, and have thus saved their energy
and labor.
Have Not Repudiated Industrial
Unionism.
But, If the workers have repudiated
the L W. W., that does not mean that
they have put the stamp of disap
proval upon industrial unionism. On
the contrary, in every industry the
question of industrial action of all the
unions engaged is being agitated.and
in some instances plans are in opera
tion which insures joint action lp
demands for improved conditions. The
Water Front and Marine Worker's
Federation of the Pacific Coast is the
latest movement in this direction.
This federation had its birth in San
Francisco, and includes the unions of
sailors, riggers and stevedores, fire
men.marine cooks and stewards.flsh
ermen, bay and river steamboat men,
marine gasoline engineers, steamfit
ters, piledrivers, longshoremen, team
sters, caulkers, and hoisting engin
eers.
Experience has taught these work
ers the necessity of joint act ion.They
have learned that so far as their em
ployers are concerned they are all
the same—they are mere workers,
useful in the seafaring business, and
as such they propose to meet their
BUlpluyerß as one DOrty through their
federation. As wage earners they
have one common Interest, one com
mon set of employers, therefore the
organization that represents them all
ls the most efficient one, and will pro
duce the best results. That is Indu
trialism, and, as these various unions
learn more and more the superiority
of this method of dealing with the
employers, they will gravitate closer
together and eventually merge their
different unions.
Conditions Compel Change of Form
That is the natural, evolutionary,
met hod of progress the constant re-
THE LABOR JOURNAL
TRADE
COUNCIL
NOTES
Carl F. Bottlng and William Pylon
were elected to the vacancies in the
board of trustees.
A benefit dance for unemployed tim
berworkers has been arranged for by
the Barbers union to be given at Fra
ternal hall on the evening of April 21.
Delegate from Cooks' and Waiters'
union reported that his local had voted
for $25.00 of Journal stock; also $25.00
$25.00 had been donated to aid unem
ployed timberworkers.
Teamsters' union delegate reported
that his local had voted the sum of
$25.00 In aid of unemplyed shingle
weavers. The Tailors reported a no
nation of $10.00 In aid of the same or
ganization.
Beginning next week, April 21st, the
Everett Trades Council will meet on
Wednesday evening of each week, in
stead of Friday, as heretofore. Owing
to the fact that the Labor Journal
must go to press on Thursday it is
necessary to hold the council meet
ings the night previously in order to
afford our readers news hot off the
wire, so to speak.
Hence the change.
One of the functions of the Kverett
Commercial club, if not it's chief
(pretended) reason for being, was to
act as a conciliatory medium in the
event of labor and capital conflicts in
this community. Why does this body
not fulfill this promised function?
As a matter of fact, about the only
active part this organization has tak
en in the local conflict calling for
passing of a resolution calling for
more vigorous police repression of the
legal rights of the workers.
Why not rename this body of busi
ness men "The Spectator's Club?"
Attorney R. J. Faussett appeared be
fore the council and gave an informal
talk on the public utility situation in
Everett, plainly showing that illegal
rates upon the citizens of this munici
posed upo thee itizens of this munici
pality. A resolution of thanks to Mr.
Faussett was unanimously voted by
the council for his valuable services to
the city of Everett in exposing the
graft of the Everett Light ,t Power
Co., and for his energetic efforts to
obtain redress at the hands of this
greedy corporation.
adjustment to changing conditions
and the slufflng off of useless ap
pendages.. If there were no unions in
existence and we had the knowledge
we now possess, we would most like
ly organize industrial instead of
craft unions...But the craft union be
ing here the wisest method to pur
sue, it is to federate the unions in the
different industries and latter am
algamate them, when the turn of
events shall dictate such a policy.
Many are the conditions that urge
us, in self-defense, to ally our unions
closer together. No such conditions
ever existed before, so history can't
teach us in this line. The greatest
teacher is not the past but the pres
ent. When the employers organize
and hire a private army of spies and
gun-men to supplement the police, it
is time for us to get busy and line
up, shoulder to shoulder in one solid
mass and thus present a united front
to the masters. We must cease to be
mechanics or laborers. Being such
is merely a detail of our daily grind
Under this new condition we rlsfe
above art and craft. We become men
and brothers, all united by the fact
that we are wage earners struggling
for a better life against the combined
power of wealth. Thusly united in
industrial federations we march on
ward and upward.
SOCIALISTS VOTE TO
EXPEL STRIKE BREAKERS
DERBY Conn., April 10.—By vote of
236 to 6 the Socialist party of Con
necticut adopted an amendment to the
constitution providing that "taking
the place of a wage earner on strike
shall be deemed sufficient for expuls
ion."
STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP
Management and Circulation, Etc.
Required by the Act of August
24, 1912.
Of The Labor Journal published week
ly at Everett, Washington, for April
let, 1915.
Name of editor, Maynard Shipley,
1612 California street.
Name of managing editor. Maynard
Shipley.
Name of business manager, May
nard Shipley.
Name of publisher, Kverett Trades
Council.
Name of Owners, Kverett Trades
Council.
Known bondholders, mortgagees,
and other security holders, holding 1
per cent, or more of total amount of
bonds, mortgages, or other securities
None.
MAYNARD SHII'LKY,
Editor.
Sworn to and suhserihed before me
this 6th day of April. 1915.
PKTEH HUSBY,
Notary Public
Notary public in and for tbe State
of Washington, residing at Everett.
Washingt on.
My conimisison expires Oct. 8. 1916.
ENVIRONMENT AND
SOCIAL STATUS
The following extracts from an ad
dross recently delivered by Mr. Frank
P, Walsh, Chairman, United states
Commission on Industrial Relations,
before the City Club at Chicago, throw
flashlights on the industrial pro
blems confronting the masses of to
day. Coming as they do from a man
who is outside of the ranks of labor
they are all the more significant.
"The gtatotst influence In life," said
Walsh, "is caused by environment.
The only factor which enters into
environment is the economic factor.
The income of a family absolutely
determines its place of living and its
interpretation of life.
"You have no hesitation in saying
that there are various classes. What
are.classes? They arc human beings
of various strata. They actually
dwell on plateaus of various heights,
according to popular and universal
conception. Why? Simply because
of the economic factor in the lives of
the various classes. Each takes on
the color of its class according to its
income. The economic factor decides
for each class the texture and value
of its clothing, the quality of its food,
its place of residence, its associates,
Its tastes, Its amusements; indeed,
every outward aspect of lift? is lived
practically the same way by each in
dividual in each class. And the
economic factor enters more largely
into the mental aspects of the in
dividual than it does into his physical
aspects, His belonging to any of the
various classes practically determines
for him his views on morals, sociology
sin and suffering. If you will ana
lyze your views, you will find that
they practically coincide with those of
of persons of your own class."
IN COLORADO
The legislature of Colorado has
been showing its devotion to the mint
owning interests. With the brief ex
ception of the populist regime, in
which Gov. Waite and Lieut, Governor
Coates stood firmly for the rights of
the miners, the government of Colo
rado lias been in the possession of
the Mine Owners' association.
The present legislature has gone
to greater extremes than any of Its
predecessors In enacting laws to serve
the interests of the feudal lords.
Laws have been enacted which might,
well have been taken bodily from the
medieval sattutes enacted to keep the
serfs in subjection.
It has been made a crime to print or
write anything calculated to "incite
riot." A "riot," in the eyes of the law
consists of two or more workingmen
assembling to propose a strike, to de
mand higher wages or to protest
against the importation of strike
breakers. To "incite riot" may ba
anything from urging miners to
strike to compel the mine owners to
obey their own laws, to protesting
against the killing of women and
children by the uniformed thugs com
misioned by the state and employed
by the mine owning interests.
The legislature of Colorado has
made it a felony to "attack " a uni
formed thug. It likewise lias been
made a crime to refuse to obey the
orders of a thug, providing the thug
has enlisted in (lie militia while in
the pay of the mine owners.
It is a striking indictment of the
ability of the American workingman
to use his political power for his own
protection that in those states Where
the miners and workers affiliated with
them to constitute the bulk of the pop
ulation, the government lias been used
to oppress them.
The great body of the workers,
through misleadership, lias learned
nothing from its unhappy experience.
In Colorado, after having been kicked
and bullied and jailed, where they
were not shot, under the Republican
Pcahody and Democratic Amnions, the
workers are still jumping from the
mine owners' frying pan into the mine
owners' fire in a vain endeavor to
obtain relief.
Stupid as the Bourbons were, at
least they knew that they could ex
pect nothing from their enemies.
IT PUZZLES YOURS TRULY
Just supposing that a German war
vessel should hear, right now, we
mean, the S. O. S. of a British passen
ger ship, sinking after a collision at
sea. Would it hasten to the aid of the
passengers and crew?
Why, of course it would, and once
there would rescue every man jack or
a trying; and would take them on
board and feed them, and clothe them,
too, if need bo. And the other way
round it would be the same.
And yet if they met that same ves
sel steaming along, in good health,
figuratively speaking, they would send
it to the bottom and set the passen
gers and crew adrift in small boats to
possibly perish.
This cussed, curious, complexity of
hum.Hi nature surely gets our goat.- !
Seattle Star.
Contentment tncav mean luck of de
sire.
the Home Bakery
PUBLIC MARKET
SATURDAY SPECIALS
dosen (fookies 25°
High Grade Candy, tOe, at, special, pound 25c
Home Made Pies, Cakes and Bread
Ideal Baker's Bread Free Deliyjery
ROBBINS TRANSFER C
PHONES 371 I
We Move Auything—Day and Night
Service
2000 BLOCK
2019 Hewitt
Dealers full line
Mechanics Tools all Kinds
Builders' Hardware
Cutlery, Sporting Goods,
Guns, Ammunition,
Fishing Tackle, Paints
and Varnishes
CURRAN HARDW'RE Co
Both Phones 24
AMERICAN
DYE WORKS
LEADING CLEANERS
SUITS PRESSED 50 CENTS
Both Phones 248
2821 Wetmore Avenue.
WOOD & SON
S. H. WOOD HARRY WOOD
Ind. Phoni; 368-Y
Wall Paper, Paints, Varnishes and
Glass—Painting, Paper Hanging and
Interior Decorating.
280G Rockefeller Everett, Wash.
We have a repair shop in connection
with store and have an expert repair
man in charge of same. We make a
specialty of repairing motorcycles, bi
cycles, typewriters, cash registers,
guns and revolvers. We also do lock,
safe and key work. Telephone and
we will call for your work and return
same when repaired. At
ARTHUR A. BAILY'S
Sporting Goods and Hardware Store
Both Phones 75
MILLINERY
All Latest Novelties in Millinery
McBEAN'S
1924 Hewitt Everett, Wash.
UNION PLUMBING AND
HEATING SHOPS
R. M. WESTOVER.
H. C. BROWN.
A. M. RICHARDS
F. W. DA I LEY.
A. P. BASSETT.
THOMPSON PLUMBING & HEAT
ING COMPANY.
BARGREEN'S
GOLDEN DRIP COFFEE
WILL PLEASE YOU
IMPERIAL TEA CO.
1407 Hewitt Aye. Both Phones
J. L. MORROW
THE TAILOR
CLEANING AND PRESSING
2811 Hewitt Avenue. Everett
CITY DRUG STORE
Everett's Largest Drug Store
1910 Hewitt
PRESCRIPTION DRUGGISTS
Chris Culmback
—Wholesale—
TOBACCO AND CIGARS
1405 Hewitt Avenue
Both Phones 237
SOUTH PARK GROCERY
41st and Colby
Dealers in
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES
GRAIN AND PRODUCE
We carry a complete line of Chick
en feed as well as full line of groce* res
Both Phones 46
JOHN F. JERREAD
UNDERTAKER
AND EMBALMER
2939 Broadway Phone M. 230
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
Meadowmoor
Dairy Store
1916 Hewitt Aye.
Full line of
DAIRY PRODUCTS AT THE
RIGHT PRICES
Ice Cream Always on Hand
RUDOLPH HULTMAN
TAILOR
(Successor to Hultman & Dohtin)
2908 Wetmore Aye.
Fine Custom Tailoring
Expert Workmanship
WONDER MERCANTILE
COMPANY
Men's Furnishings
and SHOES
Union Suits Made to Order
S:UES&SON, Props.
Cor. Hovt and Hewitt Axes
HEALY SHEARTON CO
FORD CARS
Largest Retail Stock of Accessories
in the State
EVERETT WASHINGTON
CAMERAS AND FILMS AT
DEANS
FREE DELIVERY
i
Buy on Credit -
We Trust You!
Our exceptional "Ea'-y Pay" plan
differs decidedly from the credit
system offered by so-called install
ment houses. It has been perfect
from the results of a quarter of a
century's dealing with the home
furnishers of Everett and vitinity
—there are no annoying features—
absolutely no embarrassing condi
tions—no extras or pub'icity.
—BY OUR MODERN PERFECT
ED PLAN. YOU CUY HERE AT
CASH PRICES WITH THE PRIVI
LEGE OF EXTENDED PAY
MENTS. USE YOUR CREDIT
NOW!
THOMPSONS
2916 HEWITT AYE
We now have the Silk Boot Hose
in Black or white at 25c
Silk Lisle Hose 25c and 50c
Full Length Silk Hose. 50c to $1.50
Beautiful patterns in Summer
Crepe Goods; yard 17c to 29c
Romper Cloth for Children's clothes
per yard 15c
SOMETHING FOR EVERYBODY
STAR SHOE STORE
E. E. WEBER. Proprietor
2909 Hewitt, Avenue
Let It
WATCH AND JEWELRY RE
PAIRING
A. P. Miller 1906 Hewitt Aye.
MILLINERY!
Special Sale Fridcy and Saturday
New location, opposite B.vron's
2808 Clby avenue
Lawn Mowers Ground
AUTOMATICALLY
FURNELL'SS REPAIR SHOP
29923 Oakes. 627 503-Y
FINK'S OVERALLS
At ERICKSON'S
2913 Hewitt
THE! AREKJNION M AED j
IT'S UP TO YOU
to live better at leu expense i' you
want?
WE OFFER YOU
more for your money?
Many and many a housewife takts
advantage of our offerings Even if
you only save 25c a day on your
groceries, that amounts to over $60
a year. The mx: time >ou order
groceries phone to the
Farm Products Ass'n,
The store that put the crimp in
•'High Cost of Living in Everett.
M EVER'LOCr'
Best Optical Service
Glasses Properly Fitted.
We Grind Our Own Lenses
We Have No Travelers
All Work Done on Premises
Satisfaction Guaranteed
Everett Optical Co.
Baker & Sandstein
2812 COLBY AVENUE

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