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The labor journal. (Everett, Wash.) 1909-1976, August 13, 1920, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085620/1920-08-13/ed-1/seq-2/

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Page Two
Published every Friday bs the Everett Central Labor Council.
Entered at the Poatoffice In Everett, Wash., as second-class matter
Office, Labor Tempi* Phone Main 116
Subscription, II 00 pel rear in advance Advertising rates on application,
MRS. M. R. STAUFFER Advertising Manager
GEORGE E, RIGGINS, Editor
Hoard oi (ontrol
Meet second Sunday of each month at II a. in. in Labor Temple.
FRANK JOHNSTON, Pn idcnl I ooks and Waiters
FRED K. OVKKM AN, \ le, President Printers
.1. It. MONCUR, Beeretarj Plumbers
OSCAR F. WEFFERLING, Treasurer Molders
ADDRESS all communications to The Labor Journal. Labor Temple,
I v nil. W nsliinglon
\\ X WIN WIN"
The l .umei l aboi pai I > i- pro- |
greasing finel) in its forward move
ment, the tuple Alliance, Non
partisan I rague and the t ommittee ;
of -IS tune harmonised, as no three
groups with diversit) ot opinion
ever did before, into one political
part] Phej will go to the polls In
Novemb* wth better than an equal
-bow with the old parties,
The Washington state Weekly.
that "tel the truth like bell" Organ
' '. 1 '
admits u> labor-hating supporters
are frightened as th.\ never were
before, t'h.u paper mi; s
"The t.me is sheit and anj action
taken must be carried out without
further delay.
"Action quick action Is neces
sary to save this State from the
disgrace of passing into the hands
of the radicals."
Tin-re is no doubt the progressive
elements will slick together at the
polls in November. Thej have
learned that thc> must "hang to
gether or hang separately."
Mr. and Mrs. Voter. tell you
friend who is afraid to show Ins in
dependence m political activity that
he will have no cause to be afraid
when the Farmer I abor part) takes
the reins of government.
Don't let the bosses scare you. tie
to the registration officer in your
precinct and register, then go to the
polls aiivl Vote. Note yourself free!
I tKMEK I VBOK c(>\ EKN
MENT MAKES HOOD
The Farmer Labor coalition gov
ernment of Ontario has just con
cluded its first legislative session,
which has established the precedent
of having enacted more advanced
social legislation than has even been
considered within the past decade by
previous administ rations.
When the farmers and labelites
undertook the legislative reigns, pie
dictions were heard on all sides, con
fidently limiting the newcomers'
tenure of office to a matter of a
few months. It wa said that the
essentially divergent ideals of the
farmers an.l those of tin labor men
could not withstand the obstacles of
the eight-hour day, minimum wage,
and other questions, which were an
integral pan of the laborite plat
form.
The answer given by the coalition
to its critics is that not only has
the cleavage failed to eventuate, but
the labor group, with the sympa
thetic support of the farmers, has
successfully sponsored the enact
ment of labor legislation which,
even a year ago, would have been
considered highly radical.—Chris
tian Science Monitor.
SHIPPING BOARD
APPLIES SILENCER
Very little has been published by
the newspapers about the bill that
disperses the Government fleet of
merchant ships with a loss to the
people of nearly a billion dollara.
Even less will be published in fu
ture. The Sniping Hoard has ap
plied the advertising silencer.
\ group of clever advertising men,
with an eye always to business,
have persuaded the Shipping Board
to undertake an extensive advertis
ing campaign exploiting '.he mer
chant murine. A preliminary fuiid
l t |50,000 has been allotted to sur
vey the "possibilities" of this cam
paign.
It ;s to be sssumed that news
papers that defend the pub inter
-
the shipping bill will not be permit

"pubhc-soiri'ed" ace :ts"g agt ••:«
who operate on a commission basis
There is more than a suapision
. . •■. t
nation.

shipping trust on terms so absurdly
inadequate that they would inevit
ably provoke a vigorous protest were
the newspapers to free!] ■ * ass
Uiem.—Labor.
WILL \sk MORE \\ KGES
While the transportation bo-,
hoods have accepted the wage award,
they do so with many reservations.
One of them is that an immediate
demand will be made for another
hearing l upon a new wage schedule
that Will DO presented to the labor
board.
I"»tient until patience has ceased
t« be a virtue, the 2,000,000 railroad
workers cannot reasonably be ex
pected to continue in a losing busi
ness, especially since a pliant con
gress has guaranteed v return of 0
per cent on investment. Labor is
entitled to ;ust as much consideration
as are stockholders. It has a H
light to p-esent its new demands ami
to insit that they have early and
favorable consideration, and the ina
ot the railroads to prant the-"
will" b* a teat of the efficiency of
■rivala man*gem sat
■ itrj that hum I —iwisjhl a
bviiur wage rate for •*« vurkers
■. -/ a-< well as tni perativ*. it.
association;
win. h ri our exclusive Nprwftt&Uvc for nil
tiHttonal ndvtrlhitntf. No othet ftftcttcy i»r
in .. ol imiiernl Bdvertie-ttis will lu> recou
nt ~i ... |.\Kitll rem nil Inuuirief for ratw
NATIONAL LAIIOH PRKBS ABHOCIA-
I'lON, In.- Mum Building, Grand Rapids,
will be necessary for congress to
intervene and provide a method
whereby the workers can be certain
of fair dealing and an opportunity
to develop and maintain American
standards.
Hundreds of thousands of railroad
workers, with the recent increase
of wages, will still struggle under a
wage below the subsistence level.
It is established b> various agencies
.•;•< ..Mug independently that at least
$2,000 per year is the minimum wage
for the maintenance of an average
family in decent comfort. Very few
road men receive that sumj thous
ands of them will still receive less
..
Under the circumstances, enlight
ened public opinion will support the
rail Workers in their demands until
tiny have gamed recognition.
Employment Bureau
Is a Pressing Need
The Employment Service Hill now
no tlie calendar in Congress, ready
for action in December.
"Final passage of the bill to es
tablish a national-state employment
service on a permanent basis is one
of the most important pieces of un
finished business that will confrront
Congress next December," declares
Secretary John B. Andrews of the
American Association for Labor Leg
islation in an article in the. current
number of the "American Labor
Legislation Review."
The Nolan bill to create a national
employment bureau in the Depart-
ment of l abor has received a favor
able committee report in the House
of ({representatives and although it
did not get to a vote at the con
gressional session ending in .lune. it
has reached a place on the calendar.
This measure, while not as thor
ough going as some of the earlier
proposal- and calling for no substan
tial appropriation immediately, is
nevertheless of real merit, with good
prospects of adoption, according to
Or. Andrews.
"Much public enlightenment," he
writes, "has occurred since 1915,
when the Association for Labor Leg
islation i:ght after the tragic bread
line crisis of 1913-14—called the
first national conference on unem
ployment winch adopted a resolu
tion recommending such a federal
system as that contemplated in the
Nolan bill. Scattering efforts in
states and cities have been made to
provide at least sectional relief. War
time experience with an emergency
public employment service, whatever
its faults of operation, pointed the
constructive way to effective indus
trial mobilisation on a nation-wide
scale. The President's message of
May 20, 1919, gave recognition to
;this by urging maintenance upon an
ade iuate scale of the federal em
ployment service. A conference on
unemployment at Washington last
year, with delegates representing the
governments of states and the United
States Department of Labor, unani
in usly agreed upon essentials along
M the recent Montreal eonven

-
i •••••
.i ■ : "c
Profiteers Turn
Kc\ olutionists
It would appear that the war-made
millionaires are particularly violent
in their opposition to the proposed
'•patrimony bill," which would con
fiscate excess profits. In order to
discredit the government these gen
tll • en have been offering vast quan
titiea of Italian bonds for sale at a
low price They have spent great
- BH to foment disorders.
They ure willing to plunge their
country into civil war rather than
part with a portion of their wealth.
[" . may succeed, if they do, the
and "of the revolution will probably
see them without their wealth, and
peaaibjy without their heads.
If they were wise, they would sup
port Giolitti, the liberal, and pin their
faith to evolution rather than revolu-
Smoke Chat. Sheets CHALLENGE
111 Cigar. i"*SS
GHOST OK I. W. M.
WILL NOT DOWN
Ibe Interchurch World Movement
lias been declared dead. The CBUBC
of its di mice is charged to the Steel
Tin.l and other financial pirates in
that they shut off the Movement's
financial wind. Hut its ghost will
not down, and is filling with fear
the souls of the steel magnates and
their associates in crime. Head the
following article by ( buries M. Kelly:
it Is nut surprising thai the Steel
Trust made such extraordinary ef
forts to prevent the publication of
a report of a survey of the steel
industry made by the Interchurch
World Movement. The only surpris
ing tiling about the entile incident
is that it failed in its efforts. Cer
tainly a more damning arraignment
I,l' the high-handed, autocratic, un-
American and Inhuman methods of
the Steel Trust or any other Indus,
try has not been printed in this
country in many years.
This survey was undertaken dur
ing the steel strike last fall. It was
made under the most difficult condi
tions. Ihe officials of the Steel
Trust placed every obstruction in the
way id' an orderly Inquiry, and after
it had been completed resorted to
the methods of a housebreaker to
prevent its publication. Agents
were Installed In the offices of the
Interchurch World Movement under
instructions to steal the report after
emissaries had failed to buy it with
cold cash. When all its attempts
at suppression hail been thwarted,
the Steel Trust and Dig Business de
clared a blockade against the finan
cial plans of (be movement and it
has been practically abandoned.
Hut it lived long enough to ren
der a signal service to humanity,
lis revelations must inevitably arouse
public sentiment to t lie gravity of
a situation that is leading directly
to "unrestricted warfare," to use
the words of the report. The pres
ident is urged to appoint a commis
sion that will bring worker and em
ployer together ami prevent another
serious interruption of industry.
The report is judicial in tone,
comprehensive in scope and startling
in its conclusion. It Upholds the
claims id' the steel workers that they
were striking against a continuation
of intolerable conditions. It proves
the hollowness and insincerity of the
charge that Bolshevism or syndical
ism had anything to do with that
effort to secure industrial justice.
It censures governmental agencies
fur inaction, when they were not
openly or covertly under the con
trol of the Steel Trust. It is charged
that the press and pulpit were used
for base purposes, and denounces
the system of espionage and "un
der-COYer" men and agents provo
cateur employed by Gary to suppress
the legitimate lights of the toilers.
h is demanded that the "proper
Federal officers be requested to make
public two reports on recent inves
tigations of tlu- steel Industry, in
making which public money was
spool, and to explain why these and
similar reports have not hitherto
been made public, and why reports
printed have been limited to ex
tremely small circulations.
(, \KN FLEES TO EUROPE
That the Steel Trust was entirely
familiar with the findings of the
investigators and the recommenda
tions is evidenced by the desperate
methods that were made to secure
its suppression. 'They brand as false
every allegation made by the trust
during the strike, and for the first
time the public realii-.es how madly
it had been deceived by agencies that
were under control of the steel peo
ple. The newspapers were principal
offenders in that they entirely per
verted the issues at stake and en
deavored to inflame the public mind
by parading a charge that it was
revolutionary in its , inception and
purpose. The constant iteration of
this falsehood unquestionably alien
ated a large section of the public,
including union labor, and was re
sponsible for the collapse of the
strike.
It is noteworthy that on the eve
of the publication of the report,
President Gary, of the Steel Trust,
suddenly went to Kurope. There
can be no question that there is a
very direct relation between these
events. While the newspapers con
tinue to soft-pedal the report, the
public cannot longer be kept in ig
ance of the facts, and Mr. Gary
realized, better than many of his
sycophantic organs, that he would
be compelled to answer for the wrong
that had been dene under his di
rection or by his authority.
Unless fair play is no longer
prized by Amerricans. there will be
an immediate and postive demand
that just tee be accorded the men who
are today subjected to the most
galling conditions—conditions . that
approximate feudalism. The twelve
• day must go. That is not com
patible with twentieth century con
ception of social justice. The men
must have an adequate wage. They
are subsisting on beggarly
wages. They must have the right
to organise and bargain collectively
In short, they must be given the
rights that workers elsewhere
enjoy. Failing to receive them, there
aril be a resumption of industrial
strife, and when it comes Mr. Gary
will not find it so easy through false
propaganda to lead the public astray.
Try "BLUE RIBBON" Cigars, sc.
If >ou are v <i citizen you will
vote To be entitled to a vote you
>ou mu.t register.
C, E. OGROSKY
FINE SHOE REPAIRING
Dealer in Curses. Glove* and
Leather liootls
.'OOI HEWU'I WKNUE
JOE PESCH
SAYS:
Best ail wool clothes and Men's
Furnishings for less. Clothes tried
on in the making to insure per
fect fit. Custom Tailors' Union
Label ih each garment.
DUNDEE VVOOI.KN MILLS
171b HEW 11 1 WE.
TH E LA 808 JO! RXA I.
VIRGIN WOOL IS
STORED, WHILE
SHODDY IS USED
The reader will be able to Irani
how the profiteer! are gouging the
consumem of this county by their
manipulation of wool and woolen man
ufactured goods from other than a
labor paper. The following article
is from The Apparel Criterion, rB"
cific Northwest dry good.- and ap
parel trade journal, published In Se
attle:
Half a billion pound-; of shoddy
Were thrown on the American cloth
ing market in 1918, while a billion
pounds <d' unmanufactured, virgin
wool wen- accumulating in the store
houses. Shoddy is made of woolen
rags, re spun perhaps as often as
eight times. It is usually woven
With a -mall percentage of virgin
wool to stick UM broken fibres to
gether. Of the 820,000,000 yards of
"all wool" cloth produced by the na
tion's mills, the amount of shoddy
used would have produced 380,000,000
yards. If straight shoddy doth had
been turned out. .Mixed with a little
new wool, it entered into the com
position of a vastly greater yardage.
In the same period, the amount of
new wool used would have produced
240,000,000 yards of virgin wool
cloth, if it had not been adulterated
With shoddy.
The statistic! in the above para
graph were made public by the Na
tional Sheep and ' Wool Bureau of
America ( with headquarters In Chi
cago, which is organizing the sheep,
farm and business interests of the
country behind the French-Capper
Truth In Fabric bill. This bill was
left in the hands of the Interstate
Commerce Committees of both houses
of Congress at adjournment. It is
designed to compel manufacturers to
stamp their cloth with the percen
tages of virgin woid and of shoddy
it contains. Howard K. Greene, sec
retary of the bureau, said:
Range of Prices Desirable
"Last year, as nev« r before, the
shoddy interests succeeded in foist
ing their goods on the public. Only
600,000,000 lbs. of wool In its nat
ural state, or 800,000,000 lbs. of
cleaned wool, were converted into
cloth. Most of this amount was
mixed with shoddy to make it stick
together. If the entire 300,000,000
lbs. bad been made into pure virgin
wool cloth, it would have provided
only 240,000,000 yards, a- against the
380,000,000 yards of shoddy goods.
"It would have taken 1.0.0.000.000
lbs. of virgin wool to have made the
LAUNDRY
SERVICE
COMPANY
Dry Cleaning,
Pressing,
Laundry Work.
Prompt and Efficient Service
Call Exchange 52
MAC BEAN'S
MILLINERY
New Arrivals Daily
Corner Oakes and Hewitt
Cow Butter Store
Try Our 15c and 50c
Col'toe.
Swedish Anchovies 55c
Only Standard Phonographs
and Pianos
Columbian
Victrolas
New Edison s
RECORDS OF ALL MAKES
Service Is Our Hobby
1705 Hewitt Near Wetmore
Jas. R. Brewster Co.
(Incorporated)
Home of Union Made
CIGARS and TOBACCOS
An Up - to- Date Line of
Periodicals
TRY OCR S« SPECIAL
THE IDEAL
Billiard Parlor
UPSTAJBfI
A GENTLEMANLY RESORT
Also has tables for those who care
to spend an hour or so at
Solo. Rummy. Pinochle
Light Lunch in Connection
Cor. HEWITT and COLBY
entire 620,000,000 yards of 'all wool'
cloth turned out by our mills. But
the cut iri' amount need not have
been made of virgin wool. There
should have been virgin wool cloth
lor those who could afford it and
shoddy for thinner purses. That
would have provided for fair compe
tition between virgin wool cloth and
shoddy and for a fair range of
prices. Instead, through the lack of
stamping, shoddies were sold as 'all
wool' and the public, accepting 'all
Wool 1 to mean virgin wool, was de
nied the right of choice and the bene
fit of a range of prices.
\ irgin Wool Takes Back Seat
"Today, the stores are filled with
■ buddy clothing and a billion pounds
of virgin wool fill the storehouses.
The shoddy interests have become so
thoroughly intrenched through the
right of their product to masquerade
as 'new wool' under the popular
term, 'all wool,' that they have been
able to create in their own interest
an artificial over-supply of virgin
wool.
"In spite of this billion pounds in
the storehouses, the world produces
a third less wool annually than it
needs and the demand for new wool
is as great as ever. The shoddy
manufacturers have simply thrown
themselves between the public with
its demand for virgin wool and the
sheep men with their supply.
"As a result, the wool-growers are
being forced into insolvency. To
save those of the West from im
mediate ruin, the Federal Reserve
Hoard has authorized the San Fran
cisco Federal Reserve Bank to ad
vance money to help them carry
their unsold clips. However, this aid
affolds only temporary relief. The
farmers and sheep men must have
permanent relief from the unfair
competition of the rag-pickers.
"That billion pounds of unmanu
factured, virgin wool in the store
houses, kept from the public which
wants and needs it by the legal right
of manufacturers to use unidentified
shoddy in their 'all wool' cloth,
threatens the annihilation of the
sheep and wool industry. It is to the
interest of every voter to get be
hind the French-Capper Truth in
Fabric bill and see that it is en
acted into law at the next session
of Congress. Between enlightened
public opinion and the Truth in
Fabric law. the wool-growers may
be able to recover some of this
spring's UMUNM at next spring's
clip."
Shoddy Interests Profit.
While loaning the sheep men
money to withstand the rag-pick
ers' competition, the United States
government la doing more than any
other single agency to swell the rag
pickers' income. In the supplement
to "Commerce Reports," issued April
20, 1920. the Bureau of Foreign and
Domestic Commerce, of the Depart
ment of Commerce, reports under the
caption, "Army Garments Sal
vaged":
"The number of garments received
at Dewsbury (Great Britain) each
week is about 800,000 and the esti
mated total since the depot was es
tablished is no less than 150,000,000,
weighing about 4-1,000 tons. • • •
Those that are too dilapidated for
further wear are classified, blended
and sold as woolen rags to shoddy
and cloth manufacturers to be pulled
into fibre and re-made into cloth,
principally for the civilian trade."
Flowers Faces
Another Trial
Los Angeles. July 31.—A third at
tempt to put Sidney Flowers, form
er editor of "The Dugout," in a fel
on's cell is soon to be staged here.
iHstrict Attorney Thomas Lee Wool
wine has served notice on Attorney
John Beardsley that Flowers must
stand trial again on the charge of
criminal syndicalism. Undaunted by
his failure to secure a conviction in
*he two previous trials that cost tl»
taxpayers HOJPQO and in which his
•hief witnesses were self-confesse" 1
agents provocateur, stool pigeons an.'
hired tools of the Merchants and
Manufacturers' Association, the dis
trict attorney will make another ef
for to send to prison the young sol
dier who refused to stop fighting for
det&eCfMy after coming home I
•wo years on the battlefields of
France.
Seamen of the Great Lakes want
an eight-hour day and will prob
ably take action during the next
three weeks to secure it, according
to Victor Olander. secretary of the
Lake Seamen's Union. They are at
present working 12 hours a day while
at sea and on a basis of nine hours
a day in port. This applies only to
the deck men and cooks as the fire
men already have the eight-hour day.
Mail ;ind Telephone Orders Promptly Filled
ll Everett Department store 1 j
Uj m FORMERLY BABBQNS m
August Sale of Furs
Now in Progress
SAVINGS AVERAGE 25 TO 35 PER CENT
thing cist- of Ihe August Sale of Furs. Never were there so
—preparations will perhaps give you a better idea than any
many—not nearly .so many—fine Furs in the store for any
like occasion—and the prices fixed on a remarkably low
basis. Every Fur Wrap. Set or Piece is ticketed with an
August Sale price—the advantages in round dollars can be
seen in a moment. Advance selections are being made by
many women who appreciate the value of real choosing.
A reasonably small payment applied on any of the
Furs in this Sale will hold them till you want them
See Windows —Balcony
2000 BLOCK
2015 HEWITT
Dealers* Full Line
MECHANICS' TOOLS
All Kinds
BUILDERS' HARDWARE, CUT
LERY, SPORTING GOODS,
FISHING TACKLE
PAINTS AND VARNISHES
Curran Hardware Co.
.EVERYTHING FOR THE.
' HOME AND TO WEAR
a\ - , — J
WHITE HOUSE PUBLIC MARKET
THE HOUSE OF QUALITY
ALWAYS FAIR TO ORGANIZED LABOR
MAIN 973 HEWITT and OAKES MAIN 973
Union CAFE
(Reopened)
Will lie glad to meet old and
new fares
J. C. GAFFNEY, Prop.
1507 HEWITT
Best Optical Service
We Make Our Own Glasses
Everett Optical Co.
2807 COLBY
When You
Think of Milk, Think
of
Pioneer-Alpine
Perfectly Pasteurized
MILK
The Quality Product of
the Sanitary Milk Plant
Eleven delivery cars and
wagons to serve you
Phone Your Order
MAIN 271
Or ( all at 26th and
Broadway
Save 35 Per
Cent
on your Kodak finish
ing by having it done
at the
Graves Studio
Phone Main 099
1513!. Hewitt Aye.
EVERETT TENT &
AWNING CO.
1501 Hewitt
TENTS TO KENT
ROSE
THEATRE
VAUDEVILLE
HIPPODROME
Two Show Nightly— 7:13, 9 l\ M.
Friday. August LS. 1920.
C. M. MILLER
Doctor of Chiropractic
EXAMINATION FREE
Suite :U9 Commerce Building
Phone M. 750 Kverett, Wash.
DEAN'S Pharmacy
The Rexall
and Kodak Store
Humphrey & Lamb
Retailers of
QUALITY GROCERIES
SUNKIST PRODUCTS
All I'hones Ex. 47.
1701 Wetmore
PILLMAN'S SUIT
HOUSE
New Fall All-Wool Samples
arrived; fine fits, Lowest
Prices.
We have a number of un
claimed suits on hand; cut
prices—also Overcoats.
Union Label. It will pay
you to drop in to
2005 HEWITT AYE.
And Save Money
W. T. PILLMAN
Phone Exchange 55
MODEL TRANSFER &
STORAGE CO.
E. J. Dwyer, Mgr.
Heavy Trucking, Transfer
Baggage. Long Distance Hauling
By Auto Truck
Corner Grand and California
Headquarters for Bell Auto
Freight Line—Everett-Seattle
South Park Grocery
Dealers in
STABLE AND
FANCY GROCERIES, GRAIN
AND PRODUCE
We carry a complete line of
chicken feed as well as a full line
of groceries.
list and Colby
Phone .Main 46
TYPOGRAPHICAL CNION
No. 110
UmIS in Labor Tempi, ihr tail Monday in
nth month at 3:10 p. m.
W. t UAI'MAN. SfT.-Trf...
is:: uu k, r a»c.
'■^S 1 ••■kixters who can kirn-
IsH Ihk LABKL ON Voi r PUNTING
1. Ktrrrit t'riiu Shop.
-• I* l ' Daß) Herald Company
3. Morning- Tribune l>ubli»hin«- Co.
.. Kant A Hanua Cumpaiiy.
I ommrrrial l'rm.
I*u«n Preaa.
«'. S. Hrown & Co.
Dr. Peters' Kuriko
and Swedish Anjovis
—AT—
Cow Butter Store
< or. Hoyt and Hewitt
We have a repair shop in connec
tion with store ami have an expert
repair man in charge of same. We
evele " of repairing motor-
Hie*, bicycles, typewriters, cash
T' g 'i Ui * nd reVl) l v er S We also
2 lock - f afe key work. Tele
phone and we will call for your "work
"rthu r rr R a t m,i whsn
Arthur A. Baily * Sporting Goods and
Hardware Store. Both phones 75
****** Now anrf av^d Rush ,
vJi >0 t T * sr,>o,, '• ,tuen **" will
vote. To b* entitled to a vote you
>ou muat register y

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