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The labor journal. (Everett, Wash.) 1909-1976, December 24, 1920, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085620/1920-12-24/ed-1/seq-3/

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Friday. December 24. 1920
You men who really believe
in labeled goods
BUY HERE
We carry nothing but
Union-Made Shoes
MEN'S
SHOE STORE
Beard Bros.
Next to Brewster's
VINGEN ELECTRIC CO.
1414 HEWITT AYE.
MAIN 673
Electric Wiring and Supplies
National Mazda Lamps
LOUDON'S
SHOE REPAIRING
BEST BY TEST
2010 Hewitt
Waltham, Elgin, Hamilton
Watches
Robt. E. Andersen
•SUCCESSOR TO
A. J. MOHN
JEWELER
G. N, N. P. and Everett Inter
urban R. R. Time Inspectors
PHONE MAIN 118R
1416 Hewitt Aye., Everett, Wash.
Our Kodak finishing is done by
experts only. Bring us your next
roll and you will be pleased
with the results.
HOME PORTRAIT STUDIO
2816 Colby Aye.
Auto Truck Service, Storage Ware
house, Piano and Furniture Mov
ing, Local and Long Distance
Hauling
Northern Transfer Co.
2938 BROADWAY
J. B. MUZZALL—BIue 1324
A. D. BEVINS—Red 264
FOR HOUSE FURNISHr
INGS, STOVES
AND RANGES
New and Used —Call at
ROBERT LAUGHTON'S
Furniture Store, 2802-4 Rucker
The Store That Saves You Mone)
H. E. STILES
FURNISHINGS
For Men
1721 HEWITT
Union Plumbing and
Heating Shops
R. M. Westover
B. M. Richards
A. Hedlund
A. P. Bassett
K. M. Larson
Louis Aya
C. R. Schweitzer
WATCHES
DIAMONDS AND JEWELRY
Best grade guaranteed at the very
lowest price possible, con
sidering quality.
D. KAMERMAN
Everett's Reliable Jeweler
Hewitt and Wetmore
Shumway&Gay
CIGARS, TOBACCO,
CONFECTIONERY
Cor. Broadway and Hewitt
EVERETT, WASH.
A. P. MILLER
JEWELER
Moved From 2830 Colby to
2931 COLBY
Union CAFE
(Reopened)
Will be glad to meet old and
now faces
J. C. GAFFNEY, Prop.
1507 HEWITT
New Shipment
of
Dry Stock Fish
and
Imp. Anchovies
at
Cow Butter Store
Cor. Hoyt and Hewitt
Humphrey & Lamb
Retailers of
QUALITY GROCERIES
SUNKIST PRODUCTS
AH Phones Ex. 47.
1701 Wetmore
PAUL WARBURG'S
IMPRESSIONS
I'nion Labor the Only Sane
Force Today in Chaotic Eu
rope.
(From Labor)
Organized labor is the only force
in Europe which is making a sane
endeavor to lead the way out of the
chaos which came in the wake of the
World War, according to Paul M.
Warburg, a prominent New York
banker, member of the Kuh», Loeb
& Co. financial institution, who has
just returned from an extensive tour
and investigation of conditions
abroad. We presents his views in a
lengthy article which was published
in the New York Times, Sunday,
November 14.
"Organized labor in Europe has
shown itself quicker to recognize its
duties and opportunities," writes Mr.
Warburg. "Constructive organized
labor has found ways to get to
gether across national lines, and it
has shown the courage and vision to
think and act, both nationally and
internationally at the same time. It
is organized labor in its various
forms—let us make no mistake
about it—that so far has stemmed
the tide of Bolshevism in Europe.
It is on the sanity and sagacity of
the leaders of conservative labor
more than on any other factor that
Europe's hopes must rest today."
Mi. Warburg expresses his admi
ration and appreciative interest in
the vision and broad grasp of the
siuation shown by the British Trade
Union Congress at its recent Ports
mouth convention. He quotes from
resolutions adopted and arguments
presented by various labor leaders
as evidence of the capacity and abil
ity of labor to have a larger part in
governmental and industrial affairs
of the civilized world. He comments
upon the inability of French and
British financiers to make the prog
ress of reconstruction that had been
hoped for and says that the press of
these two countries keeps the people
in ignorance about the true state of
conditions in other countries, fans
hatred and suspicion nad blocks the
way to inauguration of reconstruc
tion movements.
(The press of this country is sub
ject to the same charge.—Ed.)
Labor Is Showing the Way
"Leaders of business and finance
have not been able," says Mr. War
burg, "as effectively as labor to get
across the national border lines, cut
ting loose if necessary from the
apron strings- and embargoes of
party governments. They have not
been able to get together as inde
pendently upon a broad international
program. Their efforts have re
mained unorganized, sporadic and
timid, while the governments that
hold them in leash have not been
able to emancipate themselves from
the sway and influence of the chau
vinists. Capitalistic society, as rep
resented by the various govern
ments, has not been able to shake
off its extremists as rapidly and
energetically as has conservative, la
bor. It is largely because of this
and because these governments are
too slow in retracing certain steps
that labor has lost confidence in
„theii efficiency and their moral
strength. Labor therefore, defies
their authority by taking recourse
to so-called 'direct action.'
"It is unnecessary for me to say
that I am not an advocate of 'direct
action,' and am I blind to the grave
blunders that labor leaders have
made. They have overreached them
selves at times, like all other lead
ers. But no government can rest
its success and authority upon the
mere exploitation of wrongs done by
its opponents. If it wishes to sur
vive, it is most essential that it
clear its own skirts from mistaken
acts or politics. 'At present the Bol
sheviki and radical labor find their
strongest moral support in the mis
taken deeds, past and present, of
governments directed or controlled
by the will or fear of the bitter
enders and militarists.'
What History Teaches
"Who can think of Egypt, Baby
lonia, Greece, Rome, Carthage or
Byzantium and believe that modern
Europe has a charmed life as a
leader in progress and civilization?
We are prone to believe that the
world has grown old and that cer
tain conditions have reached their
final forms in which they are to
stay. But the world is as much
In a state of flux as it ever was.
The migration of the people is as
active in our generation as 2,000
years ago. Our large steamers trans
port in a week more people than
Hengist and Horsa or William the
Conqueror carried into England.
Merry
Christmas
to All
This store will remain closed Saturday,
Christmas Day; will open Monday with
the greatest sale ever held in the city of
Everett. Do not fail to come —it will
mean big money to you.
1504 HEWITT Saves You Money MAIN 177
"Civilization, starting in Central
Asia, kept on mnrching west to
Asia Minor, the Mediterranean and
Eastern Europe. A few generations
hence will the historian, find that it
crossed the Atlantic and made Amer
ica the standard bearer? Who
knows? It will depend upon Eu
rope's ability to arrest the present
process of disintegration before it is
too late.
Tangible Result of War
"Few people realize clearly enough
that the world at present is suffer
ing not only from the aftermath of
four years of one of the fiercest
wars ever conducted, and of two
years of continued extermination
after the cessation of open warfare,
with actual peace still unaccomplish
ed, but also from the consequences
of a social evolution as far reaching
as those connected with the liquida
tion of the Roman Empire and the
French Revolution. It is this com
bination of circumstances that ren
ders the problem so complex and so
desperately grave, and should make
us apprehend a long period of re
cuperation. Europe at present is
like a big steamer sunk by a tor
pedo. It is idle to discuss today
Wishing you a
Merry Christmas
and a
Happy New Year.
We renew our
pledge of Quality
and Service ren
dered with utmost
courtesy.
Everett Pharmacy
Hewitt, at Rucker
City Drug Store
1910 Hewitt Aye.
Wishing all of our
patrons and friends
A MERRY
CHRISTMAS
BANKS PIANO CO.
Thanking you for
Past Patronage and
wishing you a
MERRY XMAS
and a
Happy New Year
Walter C. Steams
2825 Colby
THE LABOR JOURNAL
I what kind of n restaurant or social j
hall she should have when she is '
■ afloat again. The first question
is: 'Can we raise her at all?' The
second is, 'After we raise her, can
we repair her engines and make her
go?'
"It will probably prove the great
est tangible result of the war that
all the world over, labor has ceased
to be considered as simply a dead
item in the cost sheet of produc
tion. Labor instead of being a
means, has become an end in itself,
as is the inalienable right of every
human being.]'
Evolution in Germany
Mi. Warburg expresses it as his
opinion that the new German repub
lic is advancing the most progressive
solution of the industrial problem in
all Europe. Germany has enacted
legislation making obligatory the or
ganization of shop councils in every
establishment employing more than
a" given number of hands. These
councils have certain rights with re
spect to the working conditions of
the employees. They also may have
one or more representatives on the
boards of directors of corporations.
"Representatives of these councils
arc grouped together in superimpos
ed organizations in order to deal
with questions affecting an entire
industry or profession. And final
ly, members of these larger organ
izations are delegated to act on an
economic council of the entire re
public, which council acts as an
advisory body to the Parliament.
Sees Industrial Democracy
"One can readily see the vast pos
sibilities of such a plan," says Mr.
Warburg, "which, in effect, creates
a second house of non-political ex
perts, on which all important unions,
guilds and professions are repre
sented. There would not be any
possible call for 'direct action,' par
ticularly, if this body of experts in
due course of time were endowed
with the same rights to vote as the
political chambers. It is not be
yond the bounds of imagination to
suppose that, instead of two political
bodies, like the House of Commons
and the House of Lords, or the
House of Representatives and the
Senate, nations in the future flight
have one Parliament deciding legia
lation for the people.
"From what I have been able to
learn from President Millerand's
plans, they appear 'to follow a simi
lar trend of thought in that they
contemplate making the French Sen
ate more representative of the
guilds, trade unions and chambers
of commerce of France. It is
realized, of course, that for the
United States a development on
these lines must be considered as
entirely remote, but of all the in
teresting evolutions taking place
in Europe at this time the prog
ress in this direction strikes me as
one of the most significant and one
deserving our closet attention."
Smoke BLUE RIBBON 5c Cigar.
An Effort Is Made For
Release Emil Herman
Everett, Dec. 15, 1920.—Believing
that Emil Herman, sentenced to
ten years hard labor in Federal Pen
itentiary, on June 3rd, 1918, under
the Espionage Act, is being unjustly
held in prison; and being convinced
that an impartial review of his case
cannot but prove the truth of oui
contention, do, herewith, respect
fully submit the following facts in
support of our position.
Emil Herman was placed under
arrest, charged with violation of the
Espionage Act, upon April 19th,
1918. There was no specific charge
of any word or act, at the time of
his arrest; but after his removal to
the Snohomish County jail, his of
fice in Everett was entered by U. S.
Marshall Rook, Dept. of Justice op
erative, R. E. L. Johnstone, Secret
Service Agent Chas. Petrovitsky and
another detective, by name George
English, who thoroughly searched
the premises, and confiscated an im
mense quantity of literature and
supplies. After going over the of
fice, thoroughly, three times, and
satisfying themselves that all which
could possibly be used against the
accused had been found and remov
ed, while waiting for the dray which
was to take away the confiscated
stuff—complete office files for four
years directly preceding the arrest,
organization supplies such as So
cialist Party Dues Stamps, etc., ac
count books, ledger, pamphlets,
books and such matter—one of the
men, idly looking about at various,
pictures and mottoes on the wall,
took down a card bearing a motto
which was tacked on the side of the
book shelves. Its removal disclosed
a small "sticker" of the kind widely
circulated by the Socialist Party and
other organizations years before, and
which had evidently been pasted
there at that time, for it was so
faded and discolored with age as to
closely resemble the brown book
case upon which it had been placed
so long ago. This "sticker" was
removed, with great difficulty by
the raiding officials and carried
away in the coat pocket of Marshall
Rook. It subsequently formed the
basis for the indictment against the
accused, upon two counts of which
the jury returned a verdict of
"guilty"—although the evidence in
troduced by the defense proved,
conclusively, that it had been placed
there, years before, by a former
incumbent of the office of State
Secretary of the Socialist Party of
Washington; that the accused was
unconscious of its presence in the
office; that he had never called any
one's attention to it; had never, in
! any manner, attempted to prevent
j enlistment in the U. S. Army con
; trary to law. Chas. Petrovitsky,
the "Prosecuting Witness," perjured
himself in giving testimony to the
effect that the "Sticker" was the
"first thing which met his eye upon
entering the office." He brought no
evidence to support his word, al
' though Marshall Rook, R. E. L.
Johnstone and Detective English
had been with him, and had seen its
discovery, and the wife of the ac
cused and Peter Husby, also eye
witnesses, testified that it had been
found as related above.
Herman was (riven a preliminary
bearing before Commissioner Mans
field, and bound over to the Grand
.lory under $25,000 bond, spending
about a week in the Snohomish
County jail awaiting filing of the
bond. Upon indictment being re
turned by the Grand Jury, arraign
ment before Judge Neterer resulted
in date of trial being set for May,
nnd new bond in the sum of $20,000,
but the property which had been ac
cepted as ample security for the
$25,000 bond was adjured insuffi-
Gotham Trust
Contractors
Come to Grief
New York, Dec. 17.—Twenty-nine
cut stone contractors Indicted for vio
lation of the state anti-trust act,
pleaded guilty today. The day also
saw an adjournment of the public ses
sion of the joint legislative commit
tees investigation of the so-called
"building trust."
Twenty-seven of the contractors
having corporations were fined $2,500
as individuals, with a $2,500 fine lor
each corporation. Two contractors
not having corporations, were fined
$5,000 each. Justice McAvoy ruled
that the individuals must spend one
day in jail for each dollar of their
fines not paid.
New York, Dec. 17. — Testimony
and evidence "tending to show inter
ference" In the country's building
construction by iron and steel fabri
cators and erectors will lie submitted
to the United States attorney and a
state special grand jury, the joint
legislative committee investigating
New York's "building trust," an
nounced here today.
Minutes of the meetings of the Na
tional Iron Erectors' Association,
purporting to show that the associa
tion in 1912 had dealings with the
Industrial Workers of the World
were put in evidence today before the
joint legislative committee investi
gating the building trust."
These minutes recorded "unpaid ad
advances to the Industrial Workers
of the World $100.55, bureau of in
formation $175.59."
Charles E. Cheney, president of
the association, said he could not ex
plain the entries, although his name
was signed to the records.
"Was the National Iron Erectors
secretly making payment to agents
of the Industrial Workers of the
World?" asked Samuel Untermeyer.
committee counsel.
"I don't know," replied the wit
ness.
Smoke OLYMPIC 10f Cigar.
The American Federation of La
bor is not for the pessimist. Union
men find hope in union-
cient for this new bond of $20,000,
and the defendant was held in flu-
King County jail during the time
intervening before trial.
Contrary to custom in such cases
the convicted man was hurried away
to the penitentiary on McNeil's
Island immediately sentence was
pronounced, although attorneys for
the defense were busily perfecting
the necessary preliminaries for Ap
peal, and bond was being arranged
for. When these preparations were
completed and the papers were
ready to be signed by Herman his
attorneys were informed that he had
been committed to McNeil's. Upon
going to McNeil's the astounding in
formation was given that Herman
had been rushed through the "en-"
tering" process which usually oc
cupies over a week, and had then
been shipped to Leavenworth, Kan
sas—only remaining in McNeil's a
matter of two days.
It was necessary, then, to await
the arrival of the papers at Leaven
worth before the prisoner could be
released on the bond just secured.
He was then put out of the Leaven
worth institution, with no guards of
any description, and left to make
his own way back home—or any
where he might wish to go—and a 1
his own expense.
Nevertheless, in August, after he
had returned to his home in Wash
ington and spent about six weeks
in the pursuit of his ordinary busi
ness, when he, started on a trip to
Chicago—still in pursuance of his
regular business, and with full
knowledge of his attorneys, and the
general public, and with well known
intention of returning in at most
three weeks from date of starting,
he was arrested as a "fugitive from
justice" upon advices from Prosecut
ing Attorney at Seattle, was brought
to Seattle, given a hurried hearing
before Judge Neterer whereat the
evidence of the unused portion of
his return trip ticket to Chicago was
barred, and all other evidence in
defense was summarily dismissed
from consideration by the Court,
who ordered immediate- commitment
as requested by Prosecutor Reames.
Reames declared that the "Appeal
was not being prosecuted in good
faith"—which was thoroughly dis
. proved, since the Appeal was duly
carried up regardless of the incar
ceration of the Plaintiff. The Cir
cuit Court of Appeals declined to
review the case. No reason was
given for this refusal to review oth
er than the vague one that some
technicality had been neglected by
Herman's attorney.
Had the Circuit Court of Appeals
wished to fulfill its function in
seeing that justice has been done
and that injustice shall not be done,
it would have found, by going over
the records of the Herman case, that
the following is true:
First—Herman was arrested on
suspicion only.
Second —In spite of the fact that
the government officials were in
possession of all office files (includ
ing personal correspondence taken
in an illegal seizure at his home,
also), copious samples of all litera
ture, account books, and everything
which might possibly incriminate,
it was necessary, in order to return
a true bill, at all, to base charges
upon an insignificant "sticker" which
was found by accident and clearly
proven to have been there without
the defendant's knowledge, and the
subject matter of which had never
been alluded to by him either pub
licly or privately.
Third—That irrelative testimony
was introduced, during the trial,
over objections of defendant's coun
sel, with the sole object of creating
prejudice and showing "condition of
mind" —among which were letters
written previous to the passage of
the Espionage Act—in spite of which
it could not be proved that there
was a' mental tendency toward law
breaking.
Believing the above to be a fair
and accurate statement of the facts
in regard to the case of Emil Her
man, we, therefore, recommend a
careful review of the records by the
Attorney General at Washington, I
D. C.
The above statement was intended
to be the head of a petition, but in
stead was endorsed by the Central
Labor Council of Everett and sent to
to other labor councils in this state
1 and Portland, Oregon.
Smoke CHALLENGE 10c Cigar.
PRE-INVENTORY
SALE
Starts Monday at 9:00 A. M.
A CLEAN-UP SALE OF ALL ODDS AND
ENDS WHICH WE WISH TO
DISPOSE OF BEFORE
INVENTORY
AT RADICAL REDUCTIONS
HALF PRICE AND LESS
Store Closed All Day, Christmas,
December 25, 1920
Cor. Hewitt and Rockefeller Ayes. Phone Main 217
Jas. R. Brewster Co.
(Incorporated)
Home of Union Made
CIGARS and TOBACCOS
An Up-to*Date Line of
Periodicals
TRY OUR 5c SPECIAL
THE IDEAL
Billiard Parlor
UPSTAIRS
A GENTLEMANLY RESORT
Also has tables for those who care
to spend an hour or so at
Solo, Rummy, Pinochle
Light Lunch in Connection
Cor. HEWITT and COLBY
South Park Grocery
Dealers in
STAPLE AND
FANCY GROCERIES, GRAIN
AND PRODUCE
We carry a complete line of
chicken feed as well as a full line
of groceries.
41st and Colby
Phone Main 46
WHITE HOUSE PUBLIC MARKET
THE HOUSE OF QUALITY
ALWAYS FAIR TO ORGANIZED LABOR
MAIN 973 HEWITT and OAKES MAIN 973
PASTIME
AMUSEMENT PARLORS
Corner Wetmore and Hewitt—in Basement
26 POCKET BILLIARD TABLES
25 SOLO CARD TABLES
Patronize The
Union Club Room
For Your Union Made Cigars and Tobaccos
OWNED BY ORGANIZED LABOR
The Famous BALDWIN PIANOS, ELLINGTON, HAMILTON, HOWARD
MONARCH—in Grands. Flayers and I'pright*
HAWTHORNE PHONOGRAPHS
ECKLUNI) BROS. MUSIC HOUSE
Main 12 "The Music Mart" 2814 Colby Aye.
SHEET MUSIC FLAYER ROLLS
MR. AND MRS. UNIONIST
Take advantage of our Fret- Delivery. Phone Main 30 for
the Real Rome Made Sausage and the Best Meat Obtainable,
at Reasonable Price*.
HOME SAUSAGE & MEAT CO.
Strictly Union Market
JARVIS & JACKSON
"Good Smokes"
1703 Hewitt Aye. Phone Main 36
MEADOWMOOR ICE CREAM
Is Always the Best
Meadowmoore Ice & Cold Storage Co.
1918 HEWITT AYE. MAIN 740, MAIN 39R
Make your Xmas present
a Savings Account, which
will be greatly appreciated.
Citizens Bank &
Trust Co.
Phone Exchange 56
MODEL TRANSFER &
STORAGE CO.
E. J. Dwyer, Mgr.
Heavy Trucking, Transfer
Baggage, Long Distance Hauling
By Auto Truck
Corner Grand and California
Headquarters for Bell Auto
Freight Line—Everett-Seattle
Page Three

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