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The labor journal. (Everett, Wash.) 1909-1976, March 10, 1922, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085620/1922-03-10/ed-1/seq-3/

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Friday, March 10, 1922
You men who really believe
in labeled goods
BUY HERE
We carry nothing but
Union-Made Shoes
MEN'S
SHOE STORE
Beard Bros.
Next to Brewster's
Plumbing & Heating
E. A. Francois
2811 Rockefeller, Main 571R
Res. Phone Black 209
Our Kodak finishing is done by
experts only. Bring us your next
roll and you will be pleased
with the results.
HOME PORTRAIT STUDIO
2816 Colby Aye.
C. E. OGROSKY
FINE SHOE REPAIRING
Dealer in Purses, Gloves and
Leather Goods
2001 HEWITT AVENUE
H. E. STILES
FURNISHINGS
For Men
1721 HEWITT
Shumway & Gay
CIGARS, TOBACCO,
CONFECTIONERY
Cor. Broadway and Hewitt
EVERETT, WASH.
A. P. MILLER
JEWELER
Moved From 2830 Colby to
2931 COLBY
Swedish Anchovies 40c
Peterson's Rytak 25c
Peterson's Health Crest....2sc
Also Anchovies in bulk.
Cow Butter Store
Cor. Norton and Hewitt
Phone Main 534
Pioneer-Alpine Dairy
Milk
PUREST Sold in the
City
This was proven by re
cent tests made by Dr. Pos
son of the United States
Dept. of Agriculture when
he gave our milk the high
est score of any milk sold
in the city.
Quality and Service
Pioneer-Alpine Dairy
2fith and Broadway
MAIN 271
EVERETT HARDWARE CO.
Dealers in
Mechanics' Tools, Builders
and Shelf Hardware, Cut
lery and Sporting Goods.
Phone Main 82
2019 HEWITT AYE.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION
No. 410
MmM in Labor Temple the laat Monday In
each month at 5!l0 p. m.
W. CHAPMAN. Sec.-Treaa.
1523 Rmkrfeller Aye.
KVERKTT PRINTERS WHO CAN FURN
ISH Till: LABEL 00 YOUR PRINTING
1. Everett Print Shop.
2. Everett Daily Herald.
S. Ev.rett Daily Newa.
4. Puiet Prena.
5. C.raff Printing: Co.
7. Kane & Harrua.
r»mmeri-ial Preaa.
We are in Business
for your Health
EKHO DRUG STORE
Humphrey & Lamb
Retailers of
Q'' ALITY GROCERIE6
SUNKIST PRODUCTS
All Phones En. 47.
1701 Wetmore
JOE PESH SAYS:
Demand the Union Label in
your clothes and help your fellow
workman.
JOE PESCH, Tailor, 1716 Hewitt
Save 35 cents on the Dollar
by having your Kodak finishin •
'lone at the
GRAVES STUDIO
WIS! 2 HEWITT
(Opposite Crand Leader)
Have That Suit Cleaned
and Pressed at
AMERICAN DYE
WORKS
2821 Wetmore Main 2*
JOE PESH SAYS:
You protect your fellow work
man by demanding tho Union
Label.
JOE PESCH, Tailor, 1716 Hewitt
Best Optical Service
We Make Our Own Glasses
Everett Optical Co.
2807 COLBY
IF YOU WANT
THINGS?
Economize on food, buy
where groceries and meat
cost less, and you can have
the other things you want.
We sell Meat and Groceries
at very reasonable prices. It
will pay you to trade here.
FARM PRODUCTS
ASSOCIATION
ROSE
THEATRE
HIPPODROME
VAUDEVILLE
Two Show Nightly— 7:15, 9 P. M.
BREWSTERS
Hewitt and Colby
For Your Smokes
Fountain Lunch in
Connection
EVERETT TENT &
AWNING CO.
1501 Hewitt
TENTS TO RENT
OWL PHARMACY
1607 HEWITT
Ex 176
Exchange 55
Phone
MODEL TRANSFER &
STORAGE CO.
E. J. Dwycr, Mgr.
Heavy Trucking. Transfer
Baggage, Long Distance Hauling
By Auto Truck
Corner Grand and California
Headquarters for Bell Auto
Freicht Line—Everett-Soattte
Union Plumbing j
Heating Shops
R. M. Westover
B. M. Richards
A. Hedlund
A. P. Bassett
K. M. Larson
Louis Aya
C. R. Schweitzer
E. A. Francois
Vie Matson
Monroe
WELLER & BERRY
(Successors to Jarvis & Jackson)
The Very Best
Cigars, Cigarettes, Smoking
and Chewing Tobaccos
Pipes, Smokers*
Articles, Etc.
Choice Candies and Soft Drinks
Cozy Card Room
Phone Main 36
1703 Hewitt
MAC BEAN'S MILLINERY
Now Located at
2915 Colby avenue
Next Everett Theatre
VIEWS ON THE RECOGNITION
OF THE MEXICAN GOVERNMENT
'i (By Samuel Gompers, in the Amer
ian Federatjonist)
Eor more than a year the present
government of Mexico, elected in
j what was undoubtedly the fairest
| election Mexico has ever had, has
! been in power and has maintained in
| Mexico a degree of public order that
compares favorably with the degree
of public order maintained in any;
other country.
It the state department of the
United States is operating under the
formula laid down by former Presi
dent Wilson in his refusing to recog
nize the usurper the dictator Iluerta.
as it seems to be, the administration
of President Oliregon has undoubt
edly met all the requirements of that
formula and is entitled to recogni
tion.
It is true that the United States
government, through the state de
partment, has asked the government
of Mexico to enter into a treaty
prior to th eextending of recognition
It must be admitted, however, that
the Mexican administration has had
all the better of the argument on
this point.
It sets forth that it cannot in
honor enter into an agreement which,
would compel it to do those things
which it intends to do and is doing.
This position is one which commands
th>! respect of those who are not in
down light opposition to everything
Mexican. It is contended, further
more, that such a treaty, even if en
tere i into, would be a ridiculous
proceeding, inasmuch as a treaty
with an unrecognized government—
and that what the American state
department is seeking—would be,
after all, a worthless instrument
unless ratified by the Mexican gov
ernment following recognition.
Americans who are not prejudiced
one way or another by a desire to
get possession of Mexican natural
resources upon the most favorable
terms end conditions, are coming
more and more to the conclusion
that there has been something more
than diplomacy at work in the rela
tions between the two countries. It
is a fact beyond dispute that Amer
ican capitalists have sought to shape
the policy of the United States in
such a manner as to bring to Ameri
can investors the largest possible
return. When these investors felt
that intervention in Mexico would be
a good thing for them, they were for
intervention. More recently it evi
dently has been their conviction that
by attempting to retard the granting
of recognition they could wring
larger concessions and more favor
able investment terms from the Mex
ican government.
It is quite possible that the com
plete story of the intrigues of Amer
ican bankers, American oil interests
and American investors and would
be investors in Mexican mineral,
land and timber resources, will never
be known. Sufficient is known,
however, to make certain the fact
that the amount of intrigue has been
much larger than that of which we
knowledge.
In this connection it is interesting
to note the curious conduct of Will
iam Randolph Hearst through his va
rious newspapers is now attacking
and exposing the National Assn. for
the Protection of American Rights
in Mexico, the principal organized
exponent of American imperialism in
Meyico and the principal organized ap
petite for Mexican oil and other nat
ural wealth. It is being shown that
representatives of this organization
engaged in an intrigue for the fo
menting of an armed rebellion
against the government of President
Olregon, the leader of which was to
have beer. General Pablo Gonzales.
Of course, if this plan had succeed
ed, Gonzalez would have become
president of Mexico and the servile
tool of the American investment in
terests.
At about the time when the Na
tional Association for the Protection
of American Rights in Mexico is
shown to have engaged in conversa
tions with General Gonzalez, with a
view to the overthrow of the estab
lished government in Mexico, the
American Federationist published a
detailed expose of that association
and made clear its purpose and the
character of its operations. In the
American Federationist for June,
1920, in which the National Associa
tion for the Protection of American
Rights in Mexico was fully dis
cussed, the following conclusion ap
pears:
"The conviction is inescapable that
the association has for its purpose
the arousing of suspicion, distrust
and enmity in the United States to
ward Mexico. They may never use
the word 'intervention' and they may
decry its use but what need have
they to ask for intervention if they
can get everyone else to demand it!
Their propaganda is of a character
calculated to arouse anger and re
sentment. Once begin a search for
information about Mexico in the
offices of 347 Fifth avenue. New
York City, and you find yourself at
the beginning of a trail which con
sist of one denunciation after an
other, one condemnation after an
other, one criticism after another, of
things Mexican and of every policy
of the government of the United
States which seems to indlate a de
sire for peaceful and harmonious re
lations between the two nations."
This was shortly after the conclu
sion of the celebrated hearings held
by the senate committee, presided
over by Secretary of the Interior Fall
then a member of the senate. The
National Association for the Protec
tion of American Rights in Mexico
made the fullest possible use of the
hearings conducted by Senator Fall
and it was freely charged that the
association cooperated in the secur
ing of witnesses and that the attor
ney for the Fall committee was on
the most friendly terms with the
officers of the National Association.
The manner in which the hearings
were conducted lent much color to
these assertions.
At the time when the National
Association for the Protection of
American Rights in Mexico was most
busily engaged in propaganda and
intrigue, the Hearst newspapers not
only were silent, but were publishing
with evident relish testimony before
the Fall committee which was un
friendly to Mexico nad which was en
tirely satisfactory to the organized
1 oil interests. As a matter of fact,
I the oli interests can be injured but|
little by an exposition now of what
they were doing from a year to a
year and a half ago. The Hearst
publications could not have been in
ignorance of the character of the
National Association for the Protec
tion of American Rights in Mexico
at the time when that organization
• was most bitterly engaged in propa-
THE LABOR JOURNAL
ganda and intrigue, because suffi
cient information was available to
them, as to all other publications, to
indicate specifically what was that
character.
Furthermore, in addition to the
information which was made avail-
I able about this particular organiza
tion, the Pan-American Federation
of Labor subsequently made public
j protest against intrigue against
Mexico which was being carried on!'
i:i the border states of tho United
Stales. i
What Mr. Hearst issaying now is
interesting and it is to be hoped
that all possible information not yet
obtained will be secured and made
Public, but however important that
may be, the paramount issue at the
present moment is the issue of recog-j
nition of the legally-established and
w ell-conducted government of the
Mexican republic. Hy all of the
standards of government in the
diplomatic recognition of one nation
by another, Mexico is entitled to rec
ognition as an act of justice. Abso
lutely the only persons who can con
ceivably derive advantage from the
continued withholding of recognition
are certain American bankers who
hope to drive a better bargain with
Mexiro by creating in Mexico the
impression that they have some in- 1
fluence in determining the matter of ,
recognition. For everyone else, |
whether Mexican or American, the 1
advantage lies in granting inline- j
diate recognition.
The paramount reason, however. ;
dhy recognition should be granted is
that the Mexican government has
comported itself in a manner which j
justifies recognition and the Mcxi- |
can government is a governme"
which holds its power as the result .
of the democratically expressed man
date of the people.
RARE BIRDS FROM
CHINA IMPORTED
Scores of rare birds imported from
China for the department of game of
the state of Washington were in
cluded in the cargo of the steamship
Eldridge, Capt. Fred W. Brooks,
when she docked at Smith Cove yes
terday afternoon from the Orient.
The birds were brought here by A.
J. Park, acting lor the department,
who went to China several months
ago.
Due to an accident there a large
number of birds were lost on the
vojage. but J. W. Kinney, super
visor of the department of game and
game fish, said there were still
enough remaining to make a good
start.
Mi-. Park reported that he had
tremendous difficulties in getting
the consignment out of China, due to
the large amount of routine that he
had to go through.
The absolutely new bird is the
Bamboo partridge, of which 300
were shipped. Mr. Kinney said they
had no idea of the exact number lost
but probably half. Straw was thrown
into the pens where they were kept,
and it was later discovered this had
been sprayed with a kind of poison
ous substance, and in eating the
grain among the straw the birds
were poisoned.
The Bamboo partridge is from the
marshes of China, and these were
brought here to be turned loose in
the Puget Sound district. It is smal
ler than the Hungarian partridge
and larger than the Bob White, but
it is said to be very fast on the
wing. It has bright coloring.
About 150 Chinese pheasants from
the northern and colder parts of
China are in the shipment! They
were selected from the cold regions
to be liberated in the colder por
tions of this state.
Twenty-five pairs of Spectacle
ducks and Mandarin ducks were
brought along. These are beautiful
ducks, and expected to do well here.
The shipment includes a Thibet
ram, from the borderland of Mon
golia and China. It lives at an ele
vation of 12,000 feet. Mr. Park
said it was one of three in captivity
in the world. The other two are in
London. The state department will
keep the ram for Mr. Park, who
plans to return to China in about
ihi'ci; weeks, and as that time he.
hopes to secure a female.
Kinney has recently brought in a
flock of prairie chickens from Mon
tana, and these will be distributed
in Lincoln county and the Big Bend
country east of the mountains, and
in Kittitas county.
The state game department will
have approximately 60,000 Chinese
pheasant eggs for distribution to
those who wish to hatch and liber
ate the birds in their counties
throughout the state. Some of the
county game commissioners are of
fering $1.00 per bird at two months
of age delivered to the local game
wardens, the state to furnish the
eggs free of charge. The depart
ment will also sell the eggs at $3
per dozen to those who wish to raise
birds for commercial purposes.
The department of game and fish
is supported by trust funds derived
from the sportsmen, receiving 10
per cent of the county license fees.
No.
SUMMONS.
In the BuP«rlor Court of the State of Wash
ington, for Snohomish County.
D. 1.. Keece and C. A. Recce, his wife. Plain
tiffs, vs. The unknown heirs of William N.
Bennett, deceased, and all other persons
or partitw unknown, claiming any right,
title, interest, lien or estate in the renl
estate described in the complaint filed
herein and hereinafter describd, Dfend
ants.
The State of Washington to the said the
unknown heirs of William N. Rennett, de
ceased, and also all other persons or parties
unknown, claiming any right, title, aatate,
lien or interest in the real estate herein
after described, defendant* :
You are hereby summoned to appear
within »ixty days after the date of the first
publication of this summons, towit: within
sixty days after the 3rd day of February,
1922, and defend the above entitled action,
in the above entitled court, and answer the
complaint of the plaintiffs, and serve a copy
of your answer on the undersigned attorneys
for plaintiffs, at their office below stated,
and in case of your failure so to do judg
ment will be rendered agaiiut you accord
ing to the demand of the complaint, which
has been filed with the clerk of the above
entitled court.
The puriHise and object of said action is
to quiet and confirm the title to the south
east quarter of the northeast quarter, and
lot one, in section five, township thirty-two
north, of range ten east of W. M., in Sno
homish county. Washington, in the plaintiffs
D. L. Recce and C. A. Recce. his wife, and
to remove all clouds from the title to said
premises and to bar you and each of you
from claiming or asserting any right, title or
interest in and to said premise*, or any part
thereof.
E. C. DAII.FY.
A. E DAILEY,
Attorneys for Plaintiff
Office and IV O. Address: Stokes Rldg,
Everett. Snohomish County, «YYaah.
First Tub. Feb. S. 1»22.
l*sl I'ub. March 10, 1922.
Have You Any Curranl
or Gooseberry Bushes?
Quarantine Issued in County on
Currant and Gooseberry Hushes
A quarantine ordering all black
curiants (rowing in this county to
be destroyed and Prohibiting the ship
ment of all five-needled pines, cur
rant or gooseberry hushes within or
from Western Washington, has been
issued by the State Department of
Agriculture to become effective
March 1, 1922.
This measure has been deemed
necessary in order to control the
white pino blister rust which was
discovered in the northwestern coun
ties of the state last fall. The quar
antine order includes the counties of
Whatcom, San Jauu, Skagit, Island,
Snohomish, King, Kitsap, Mason, Jef
ferson and Clallam.
White pine blister rust, which has
caused so much damage among the
pines of the east, is carried from the
white pine trees to currant, and
gooseberry leaves where two stages
of its life are passed. It then goes
back to the pines and in the course
of from three to six years it returns
to the CUrrantl and gooseberry bushes.
The rust cannot go from one pine
to another, according to George L.
Zundel, extension plant disease spec
ialist of the State College, but has to
go through either of tbe two bushes
motioned.
The stage of the disease that
passes from the currant or goose
berry to the pine tree is very deli
cate and lives only a short time. It
is at this time that the disease may
be controlled by the removal of these
bushes.
In the eastern part of the United
States all currant and gooseberry
plants within 300 yards of white
pine stands are being removed. This
has been found to give complete pro
tection to the trees.
How Shipping Board
Cuts Their Expenses
Mr. Elmer Schlesinger, general
counsel of the Shipping Board, has
been telling the House Appropria
tions Committee how the Shipping
Hoard is cutting down expenses.
A list of Shipping Board employes
and their present salaries was re
cently published in these columns, in
cluding two employees at $3i.000 a
year each, one at $30,000, two at
$25,000, seven at $12,000, fifteen at
$11,000, nineteen at $10,000, and hun
dreds of others at salaries ranging
from $9,500 down to $3,120
It does not appear from Mr.
Schlesincer's testimony that any of
these salaries were reduced or abol
ished. When the Shipping Board
wishes to economize it knows at
whicb end to begin—at least this is
the wav Mr. Schlesinger says they
are reducing expenses:
"Mr. Chairman, we have been cut
ting down our expense as much as we
can. For instance, we recently sent
a man in our New York office who
has cut down all the stenographers
in that office. He has cut them down
T think from $150 to $100 a month.
We have cut down all the steno
graphic force and the messenger
force."
Doubtless Mr. Lasker has saved
enough in reducing the salaries of
stenographers and messengers to pay
at least a part of the salary of an
other hiirh priced special attorney, or
another director of a bureau of in
foi-mation to send out society col
umns to the press.
"Luxury Tax" Rules
The following statement is issued
by Collector of Internal Revenue,
burns Poe, for the District of Wash
ington:
Witu the repeal by the revenue
act of 1921 of the so-called "luxury
tax" on articles of men's and wom
en's wearing apparel and other
changes in tax legislation, the bu
reau of internal revenue has issued
new regulations (47 and 48) relat
ing respectively to the excise tax on
sales by the manufacturer of cer
tain articles—automobiles and acces
sories, cameras, candy, fire arms, ci
gar and cigarette holders, liveries,
hunting garments, carpets, rugs,
trunks, etc. —and the excise tax on
works of art and jewelry.
The principal changes in the latter
taxes are that the tax on works of
art is reduced from 10 to 5 per cent
and that the tax on Jewelry and sim
ilar articles, which remains at 5 per
cent no longer includes gold or silver
ornamented glasses and spectacles.
The tax on works of art attaches on
all sales except the original sale by
the artist, a sale to an educational
institution or public art museum
and sales by dealers for resale.
While the tax on musical instru
ments has been repealed, certain in
struments such as cornets, clarinets,
ets., if made of ornamented with sil
ver or other precious metal are tax
able.
Fountain pens aquipped with gold
pen points are also taxable.
Monthly returns and payments of
the tax on works of art and jewelry
are required of the vendor.
Section 904 of the revenue act of
1921, which in the revenue act of
1918 included the tax on certain arti
cles of wearing apparel, provides
only for a tax of 5 per cent of the
amounts paid for the following arti
cles in excess of the following
prices: carpets, $4.50 a square
yard; rugs, $(! a square yard; trunks,
$35 each; valises, traveling bags, suit
cases, hat boxes, used by travelers
and fitted toilet cases, $25 each;
purses, pocket books, shopping and
hand bags, $5 each; portable lighting
fixtures, lamps of all kinds and lamp
shades, $10 each; and fans, $1 each.
This tax is not payable by the pur
chaser, but by the manufacturer, pro
durer or importer, who are required
to make monthly returns and pay
ment.
Copies of regulations 47 and 48
may be had on personal application
at the office of Collector of Internal
Revenue, Tacoma. Washington, and
the following branch offices: Spo
kane and Seattle, Washington.
Smoke CHALLENGE lOtf Cigar.
Two young women artists in Spain
arrived at a country inn, hot, dusty,
and thirsty.
They couldn't talk Spanish, but
wanted some milk badly, so one of
them drew a most beautiful highart
cow, while the other iyigled some
coins.
The (Spaniards looked, and a boy
was sent off poste-haste.
In half an hour the boy returned,
hot and triumphant—with two seats
for a bull fight!
Cor. Hewitt and Rockefeller Ayes. Phone Main 217
White Sale
MUSLIN UNDERWEAR AT
SAVING PRICES
—WOMEN'S NIGHTGOWNS, made of pink Nainsook, trimmed with
blue stitchings, in slip-over styles. Extra special,
March White Sale 69c
—WOMEN'S NIGHTGOWNS, made of white Longcloth, with colored
embroidered designs, slip-over styles. Featured for our
March White Sale 89c
WOMEN'S NIGHTGOWNS, made of pink Longcloth, with lace yoke.
Slip-on style. March White Sale, at 98C
WOMEN'S NIGHTGOWNS, made <>f white Nainsook, set-in or kimono
sleeves; slip-on style, and lace or embroidery trim.
Special, each 51.25
—WOMEN'S NIGHTGOWNS, made of fine quality Nainsook, lace
trim; V or square neck; short sleeves, in slip-over style.
Special at 51.98
WOMEN'S ENVELOPE CHEMISE
— Made of cross*harrcd Dimity, in pink; also soft, white Nainsook aiul
lace trim. Values to $2.50. March White Sale, each 51.98
WOMEN'S ENVELOPE CHEMISE
—Made of fine quality white Nainsook; lace trim, or with spray of
colored embroidery. Extra special, March White Sale 98c
WHITE HOUSE PUBLIC MARKET
THE HOUSE OF QUALITY
ALWAYS FAIR TO ORGANIZED LABOR
MAIN 973 HEWITT and OAKES MAIN 978
WE WANT TO SEE YOU AGAIN and AGAIN
and so we conduct our Amusement Parlors on a Plane of Service
affording to You the Enjoyment of
FINK POOL & BILLIARD TABLES, COMFORTABLE AND
QUIET CLUB ROOMS
Unexcelled Home Cooking and Pastries —Your Favorite Brands
of Cisaw, Tobacco* and Candies
PASTIME AMUSEMENT PARLORS
N. W. Cor. Hewitt & Wetmore
DRIESSLEIN & DEWEY PHONE MAIN 349
Steinway and Other Fine Pianos—Pianolas
Victrolas, Grafonolas, Edisons
Service Is Our Hobby
1705 HEWITT AYE.
All the Records Everett, Wash.
All the Time. Main 797
MEADOWMOOR ICE CREAM
Is Always the Best
Meadowmoore Ice & Cold Storage Co.
1918 HEWITT AYE. MAIN 740, MAIN 39R
MR. AND MRS. UNIONIST
Take advantage of our Free Delivery. Phone Main 30 for
the Real Home Made Saimege and the Best Meat Obtainable,
at Reasonable Prices.
HOME SAUSAGE & MEAT CO.
Strictly Union Market
We have a repair shop tn connec- i
ttom with store and have an expert
ropair man in charge of same. We
make A specialty of repairing motor
cycles, bicycles, typewriters, cash
registers, guns and revolvers. We also
do lock, safe and key work. Tele
phone and we will call for your "work
and return same when repaired at
Arthur A. Baily's Sporting Goods aiid
Hardware Store. Both phones 75.
EVERETT SHOE HOSPITAL
Men's Leather Half-Soles
cut to SI.OO
Men's 75c Leather or Rubber
Heels cut to 40C
Women's Shoes $1426 Half-
Soles cut to 75c
Women's Leather Heels, former
price 40c; cut to 25C
Men's Panco Soles, former price
$1.75, cut to $1.00
All other work cut accordingly.
We've lowered the price, but not
the quality—All work guaran
teed.
2005 Hewitt Aye.
ROREY-ROBEY CO.
2802 Colby Aye.. Phone Main 28<> j
Are distributors of the following !
well-known lines, of which they carr\
a full stock:
Sound Tires and Tubes.
Goodyear Pneumatic and Solid
Truck Tires.
Burd Quick Seating Piston Rings.
Jahn Pistons.
S. M. C. Brake Lining.
H. R. L. Piston Pins
Fan Belts and Radiator Hose.
Smoke BLUE RIBBON 5f Cigar.
"OFFICIAL BUSINESS
Penalty for Private Use to Avoid
Payment of Postage, $300.
And inside the envelope we found
tho following official business:
"Mrs. Albert Bissell, daughter of
Doctor and Mrs. Hubert Work, first
assistant postmaster general, who has
been spending several weeks with her
parents at their apartments at the
Wardman Park hotel, has returned
to her home at Pueblo, Colorado."
To be well thought of, think of
others. —Forbest Magazine.
Five thousand seven hundred miles
of railroad hnve been abandoned in
the United States in the last five
years, while only 3.200 miles have
been built in that period.
BEST EQUIPPED
LAUNDRY
North of Seattle
Best possible laundry work can
only be gotten where the beM pos
sible facilities abound.. No laun
dry can do the best grade of work
unless fitted for it. We do not
wish to boast, but in fairness to
our plant we must say it is the
best equipped in the state north of
Seattle, and our prices Bre low.
too. Following is a few items;
all others similar:
Shirts, up form 10c
Collars 3c
Underwear 10c
Socks 5c
MENDING FREE
Rough Dry, lb. 6c
Suits. Dry-cleaned, odorless $1.58
less „ $1.50
PEOPLE'S
LAUNDRY CO.
CLEANERS AND DYERS
Phone Ex. 52 Wall and (.rand
PUREST DRUGS
Dean's Pharmacy
Eagle Pharmacy
South Park Grocery
Dealers in
STAPLE AND
FANCY GROCERIES. GRAIN
\M> PBODUCB
We carry a complete line of
chicken feed as well as a full
line of groceries.
41st and Colby
Phone Main 46
Smoke OLYMHC OLUB 10c cigar.
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