OCR Interpretation


The labor journal. (Everett, Wash.) 1909-1976, September 29, 1922, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085620/1922-09-29/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for Three

Friday. September 29. 1022
Plumbing & Healing
E. A. Francois
2811 Rockefeller, Main 571R
Res. Phono Black 209
Our Kodak finishing is done by
experts only. Bring us your next
roll and you will be pleased
with the remits.
HOME PORTRAIT STUDIO
281G Colby Aye.
C. E. OGROSKY
FINE SHOE REPAIRING
Dealer in Purses, Gloves and
Leather Goods
2001 HEWITT AVENUE
H. E. STILES
FURNISHINGS
For Men
1721 HEWITT
Shu m way & Gay
CIGARS, TOBACCO,
CONFECTIONERY
Cor. Broadway and Hewitt
EVERETT, WASH.
JOHN F. JERREAD
UNDERTAKER AND
EMBALMER
Pioneer-Alpine Dairy
Milk
PUREST Sold in the
City
This was proven by re
cent tests made by Dr. Pos
son ol* the United States
Dept. of Agriculture when
he gave, our milk the high
est score of any milk sold
in the city.
Quality and Service
Pioneer-Alpine Dairy
26th and Broadway
MAIN 271
EVERETT HARDWARE CO.
Dealers in
Mechanics' Tools, Ruilders
and Shelf Hardware, Cut
lery and Sporting Goods.
Phone Main 82
2019 HEWITT AYE.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION
No. 410
Meeta in Labor Temple the Inst Monday In
each month at 5:10 p. m.
W. CHAIIMAN, Pee.-Treas.
1521) Rockefeller Aye.
EVERETT PRINTERS WHO CAN FURN
ISH THE LABEL ON YOUR PBINTOMS
1. Everett Print Shop.
2. Everett Ilaily Herald.
3. Everett Daily News.
4. Pucet Press.
5. Graft Printing <o.
7. Kane & Harem.
8. Commercial Press.
We are in Business
for your Health
EKHO DRUG STORE
Humphrey & Lamb
Retailers of
QUALITY GROCERIES
SUNK IST PRODUCTS
All Phones Ex. 47.
1701 Wetmore
AUTOMOTIVE REPLACE
MENT PARTS
ROBEY-ROBEY CO.
2802 Colby Aye.,
Everett
WELLER & BERRY
(Successors to Jarvis & Jackson)
The Very Best
Cigars, Cigarettes, Smoking
and Chewing Tobaccos
Pipes, Smokers'
Articles, Etc.
Choice Candies and Soft Drinks
Cozy Card Room
1703 Hewitt Phone Main 36
Dry*] Sweedish lilue Perries.
pkff ; .,
Dryed Sweedish Lingon. pkg. w
Sweedish Waffle Iron.
Anehovis, can 40c and 50c
Fat Norway Herring from Norway
Cow Butter Store
Cor. Norton and Hewitt
Phone Main 534
Save 86 tents on the Dollar
by having your Kodak finishing
done at. th"
GRAVES STUDIO
HEWITT
(Opposite Grnnd Leader)
Have That Suit ( loaned
and Pressed at
AMERICAN DYE
WORKS
2521 Wetmore Main 281
Best Optical Service
We Make Our Own Glasses
Everett Optical Co.
2807 COLBY
ROSE
THEATRE
HIPPODROME
VAUDEVILLE
Two Show Nightly— 7:15, !) I*. M.
P>REWSTERS
Hewitt and Colby
For Your Smokes
Fountain Lunch in
Connection
EVERETT TENT &
AWNING CO.
1501 Hewitt
TENTS TO RENT
OWL PHARMACY
IGO7 HEWITT
Ex 176
Phone Exchange 55
MODEL TRANSFER &
STORAGE CO.
E. J. Dwyer, Mgr.
Heavy Trucking, Transfer
Baggage, Long Distance Hauling
By Auto Truck
Corner Grand and California
Headquarters for Bell Auto
Freight Line —Everett-Seattle
Union Plumbing and
Heating Shops
R. M. Westover
B. M. Richards
A. Hedlund
A. P. Bassett
K. M. Larson
Louis Aya
C. R. Schweitzer
E. A. Francois
Vie Mai son
Monroe
MAC BEAN'S MILLINERY
Now Located at
2915 Colby avenue
Next Everett Theatre
BEFORE SHOPPING READ
THE ADS. IN THE LABOR
JOURNAL, PATRONIZE THE
MERCHANTS WHO PATRON
IZE LABOR.
SPRINGS REBUILT
Agency Lahcr Auto Springs
JOE FORSELL & CO.
2806 Chestnut Main 654-R
You men who really believe in
labeled goods
BUY HERE
We carry nothing but
Union-Made Shoes
MEN'S SHOE STORE
Beard Bros. Next to Brewster's
LINOLEUM
45c yard and up
9x12 ft. Axminster Rug $29
and up
PAGE FURNITURE CO.
Bay your Tailor Made Suits from
PlUraan, 1902 Hewitt. Save 25 to
1091 on unclaimed Suits and Over
, oats. » dv
Smoke Olympia St. Riftil, 10c r
for 25c. adv
Holmes Confectionery for Caramels.'
FARMER-LABOR CANDIDATES
WHO WILL FIGHT FOR PRODUCERS
I Under this, head we will make
I our readers acquainted with nil the
j candidates on the Farmer-Labor
tickci in the state of Washington
BS taken from the "Farmer-Labor
Bulletin."
The first ones are the candidates
for the senate and congress.
JAMES A. DUNCAN
James A. Duncan will be elected
United States Senator on November
7th. We make this statement with
a full understanding of the many!
serious obstacles that Duncan must
: overcome.
Poindexter, his chief opponent, has
! the support of a powerful political'
i machine built with plunder and 1 '
patronage. j '
Duncan has no machine, no money,' 1
no patronage and no plunder.
Poindexter has the support of I
scores of daily newspapers,
Duncan has scarcely any news
paper support at all.
Poindexter will have a huge cam
paign fund furnished by the New- ]
berry ring, the timber " trust, the i
railroads and bankers. i
Duncan's campaign will be financed (
by poor working men and farmers. (
Yes, Poindexter has the machine,
the newspapers and the money. Yet ]
Duncan will be elected. I
Duncan will be elected because he |
is a capable, honest man who stands ]
for what eighty tier cent of the Vot- )
ers really want, while Poindexter is j
a slippery traitor who betrayed every |
progressive who ever voted for him. j
The people of Washington want a i
Senator who will represent the I
People af Washington, not the Wall 1 .
Street Bankers. The people of :
Washington did not want Poindex- i
ter to vote for the Eseh-Cummins <
bill, for taking taxes off the mil
lionaires and putting them on theU
poof, for anti-strike bills and for j
seating Newberry. Hut Poindexter t
voted with Wall Street and forgot the I
people back home. November 7th ;
j will lie a day of reckoning; and Mr. \
Poindexter will discover that while {
I money bought an election for New- \
berry in Michigan i' will not buy an \
election for a traitor in Wash- I
ington. i
James A. Duncan, the clean,
straight-forward representative of I
the producers, is the right man to
defeat Poindexter, the slippery tool
of Wall Street. ,
Duncan, a machinist by trade, has 1
been a progressive in the forces of a
organized labor for twenty years. J
For the past six years he has' been ,
secretary of the Seattle Central v
Labor Council. He has always taken a
a lively interest in public affairs. He s
was a member of the first play- 1
ground association in Washington. I
He was the father of the Seattle ~
Comfort. Station movement, which ]
was vigorously opposed by the saloon i
interests. And right here it may be I
well to mention that Duncan' es- ; ,
Doused the cause of prohibition when f
the wets were still arrogant with >■
power. | ]
The organs of plutocracy will call a
Duncan a "red," because he is op
posed to Wall Street, rule. Duncan t
stands for a scientific, fundamental, c
constructive program for the benefit i
of the mass of the people. You <
don't need to guess about what Dun- |
really stands for. The complete 1
Farmer-Labor Party national plat- ;
form is printed in the Bulletin. Dun- !
can stands squarely on that platform, i
There will be no pussy-footing in f
this campaign. It is a clean-cut l
fight between plutocracy and the pro
duces. Every producer who under
stands the issue will vote for James I
A. Duncan and the entire Farmer- '
Labor ticket.
FRED N. NELSON, FOR CON
GRESS. FIRST DISTRICT.
Fred N. Nelson is a ship-builder by
trade and has been active in the
labor movement since 1898 when at
the age of nineteen he joined the
union of his craft. He is now a
member of Local 104, Boilermakers.
Shipbuilders and Helpers.
Brother Nelson has served the
labor movement in many important
positions, and was sent as a dele
gate to the 1910 convention of the
American Federation of Labor at
San Francisco and the 1917 A. F.
of L. convention at Buffalo.
Nelson worked at the Mare Island
Navy Yard for two years and at the
Puget Sound Navy Yard for five
years with an "Excellent-Excellent"
record. He served as shipfitter,
leading-man and estimator, receiving
special rating for extra efficiency.
Throughout his career Nelson has
vigorously championed progressive
measures avl progressive causes
both in the economic movement of
the workers and in the political field.
He has served as school director in
the city of Bremerton and has al
ways taken an active interest in
oublic affairs. Because of his un
usual knowledge of the shipping in
dustry and conditions in the Navy
Yard, as well as his proven loyalty
to the workers Fred N. Nelson
should be elected by a huge majority
>n November 7th.
P. B. TYLER FOR CONGRESS,
SECOND DISTRICT
The producers of the Second Con
gressional district are fortunate in
having for their candidate P. B.
Tyler. Brother Tyler is well known,
to the workers of Everett as chair
man of the local lodge of the Broth
erhood of Railway Carmen. He has
been doing splendid work as a leader
in the railway shopmen's strike, and
has the confidence and admiration of
all who know him.
Tyler was raised on a farm in the
Middle West and as a young man
learned the barber's trade. He soon
became an active member of the bar
bers' union and built up a strong
organization in his home city of
Harrisburg, PI. In 1907 he married
and moved to the Northwest and
secured a position with the Great
Northern railroad. He at once be
came active in organizing the car
department, and has held several
responsible positions in the Carmen's
Union.
The progressive voters of the sec
ond district will make no mistake in
sending P. B. Tyler as their repre
sentative to Congress. He has dem
onstrated his loyalty to the producers
by years of active and intelligent
service. He has taken a progressive
position on the great political and
economic issues of our time. He will
do all in his power to put into effect
the principles and program of the
Farmer-Labor Party.
JAMES M. PHILLIPS FOR CON
GRESS, THIRD DISTRICT
In 1920 Mr. Phillips was the- can
didate of the Farmer-Labor Party
for attorney general, polling 100466
votes. Mr. Phillips has worked as a
THE LABOR JOURNAL
common laborer and in the organized
labor movement, and is thoroughly
familiar with the problems and needs
of the workers. At the same time
he hns hod a Splendl education at
the Carlisle Indian school, the Dick
inson School of Law and North
western University. He has held
office as police judge of the City of
Aberdeen, as justice of the peace in
Aberdeen and was mayor of that city
from 1915 to 1917.
James Phillips has fearlessly
taken his stand with the mass of the
people in the great struggle between
plutocracy and the producers. He
will serve the producers well, if
elected to Congress, and should he
eleited by a large majority over his
chief opponent who has repeatedly
voted for such reactionary measures
as the iniquitous Esch-Cummins law.
ELIHU BOWLES fob CONGRESS,
FOURTH DISTRICT
Elihu Bowles was the Farmer-
Labor candidate for Lieut.-Governor
in 1920, receiving 101,044 votes. He
was born in 1866 on a farm in In-,
diana. His life work has been edu
cation and agriculture.
Mr. Bowles is a graduate of the
Kansas State Normal School and the
University of Washington. He has
taught in the common schools and
j high schools of Kansas .was the
| founder of the Pressor High School
jin Washington, and has served as su
j norntendent of the Prosser schools
for three years, and the Mount Ver
non schools for four years.
In Kansas Bowles was a wheat
grower. He is now a cherry grower
and egg farmer, having one of the
most successful ranches in Benton
county.
Bowles has always been a progres
sive on political and economic issues,
lie worked consistently for prohibi
tion and woman suffrage. He has
been active in farmers' organizations,
and a close student of the problems
with which the producers are now
confronted. The election of Bowles
will mean that the Fourth district
will be represented by a man who!
has a scientific constructive solution'
for the serious issues of our time.
HARRY J. VAUGHAN FOR CON
GRESS, FIFTH DISTRICT
Harry J. Vaughan is an ideal can
didate for congress on the Farmer-
Labor ticket ,for he is both a farmer
and a wage-earner. He was born at
Fort Calhoun, Nebraska, in 1869. He
received a high school education and
worked on daily papers in Omaha
and Council Bluffs. Later he home
steaded a farm in Montana which
he still owns. Since 11)02 he has
been employed on the Northern Pa
cific railroad first as fireman and
later as an engineer. He is now a
member of Sprague Lodge No. 133.
I'rotherhood of Locomotive Firemen
and Euginemen, and also of Division
No. 147 of the Brotherhood of Loco
motive Engineers. Mr. Vaughan now
lives in Spokane with his family of
a wife and three children,
Mr. Vaughan served one term in
the Montana legislature where be
gained the enmity of the copper
trust by pushing a bill to tax the
copper mines on the same basis that
farmers and other small property
holders were taxed. In common with
all other Farmer-Labor candidates
ho stands squarely on the party
platform and can be relied upon to
fight the battle of the producers if
be is sent to congress.
CO-OPERATIVE
PLAN FOR COAL
A constructive and new plan for
the ownership and control of the coal
industry by the consumers, is con
tained in an article in the Septem
ber 13th issue of "The Nation," by
James P. Warbasse, president of The
Co-operative League. The plan of
fered by Dr. Warbasse proposes that
"The people, not the government,
should own the coal mines and other
natural resources. The only way by
which coal can be mined solely for
the service of the people is for all
the people who use coal to own the
mines. Coal would then be pro
duced for use and not for profit."
The article calls for the creation
of a temporary coal commission by
act of congress, which would func
tion while the consumers were organ
izing to own and administer the
mines. "Such a commission," says
the author of the plan for co-opera
tive coal, "should consist of an equal
number of representatives of the con
sumers, the workers, and the mine
owners. The chairman should be ad
ditional, and should represent the
first class. In the meantime the
consumers should organize locally, in
state, and finally in a national fed
eration by the well-tested and high
ly practical method of Rochdale Co
operation."
Co-operative societies in Illinois,,
Pennsylvania. Connecticut and Mas
sachusetts have already begun to
eliminate the private retailer. Be
ginning in just such a small way, the
Co-operative movement of Great Brit
am has finally gone back to the
source of production, and has ac
quired collieries, operated by the
consumers for their own benefit.
It is pointed out by Dr. Warbasse
that, "This method of expanding the
ownership of coal mines to all the
consumers can be brought about
gradually and without social shock.
It constitutes ownership and collec
tive control by the consumers. By
this method the people can own and
distribute coal on a basis of service."
Holmes' Confectionery for Choco
lates.
A lawyer was conducting a case in '
court, wherein one of the witnesses, i
a burly negro, confessed to being en- 1
iraged in a crap game. Immediately <
the lawyersaid:
"Now, sir, I wnnt you to tell the '
jury just how you deal craps." t
"What's dat'.'" asked the witness, i
rolling his eyes. 11
"Address the jury, sir," thundered \
the lawyer, "and tell them just how t
you deal craps." | (
"Lemme outen heah!" cried the I
witness, uneasily. "Fust thing I know j .
this geniman gwine to ask me how |
to drink a ham sandwich."—West '<
Virginia Federationist. | I
A young German engineering '
student experimenting with motor-'
less airplanes rose to a height of 1
POO feet remained in the air morel
than two hours and sailed six miles i
in a straight line.
BOSTON AMERICAN
DEFENDS N. SACCO
This was the loading editorial In
The Boston American, a capitalist
paper, on September 12, 1922, the
day alter Mrs. Lola Andrews con
fessed that her testimony against
Nicola Sacco was false and that she
was forced to perjure herself by the
prosecution's co-ercive and intimi
dating methods:
SACCO AND VANZETTI
Governor Should Review the Whole
Evidence in the Light of Woman
Witnessc's Confession
We have twice received shocking
| news concerning the evidence on
which Sacco and Vanzetti were con-
I victed and sentenced to death for
' murder. Anything that disturbs the
certainty of a man's guilt who is
to die upon the assumption of his
guilt, must be a horrible nightmare
to the conscience of the community
| about to take a human life which all
I the arts and sciences cannot restore
when once taken in error.
The confession of the woman who
identified Sacco that she lied on
j the witness stand and that she was
j frightened into lying by the terroriz-
I ing methods of the prosecuting at
i torney's office is a terrible confes
i lion. She is either crazy or some
' one in the district attorney's office
at that time ought to be arrested for
attempted murder.
Tom Mooney, the labor leader of
I San FranciflCO, barely escaped being
murdered by the district attorney's
office and a lot of "big business
conspirators." It was a timely eon
| fession and a timely discovery of
evidence which saved his life.
It is now known that a lot of
the anarchists in Chicago were, not
many years ago, executed upon per
jured and otherwise insufficient evi
dence, and that more of them were
only saved by the courageous par
don of the then Governor Altgold.
The curse of the late war was
the breeding of intolerance and the
overthrow of the constitutional rights
of trial by jury, free speech, free
press and the fair selection of the
| juries.
Cowardly prosecuting officers,
seeking notoriety at the expense of
the helpless, persecuted men of radi
cal opinions everywhere, forgetting
that the accepted opinions of today
were the radical opinions of yester
day, and that the pioneers of reform
and progress were always radicals
when they first raised their voices.
Jesus himself was executed on the
cross between two thieves because
be was a radical in his day.
That Vanzetti and Sacco were not
aided by the fact that they were
well-known Socialists is certain. We
are informed that the Boston news
paper representatives at the trial,
experienced and well educated nien.i
all agreed except the one from the
most labor-hating paper in the city
that the evidence did not justify the
verdict of guilty.
However that may be, yet the con
fession that one of the government
witnesses lied against the life of a
man shows that her testimony was
not reliable, whether she is telling '
the truth now or whether she is i
not.
Of course we must not assume that
anybody in the district attorney's of
fice was guilty of the charges she
makes against them.
It is unbelievable. We do not want
to think it possible that such things
can happen in Massachusetts. But
in any event, the value of this
woman's testimony is now destroyed
and the most careful re-examination
of the whole evidence ought to be
made by the governor.
And the people ought to consider
once more whether they even have
the right to take human life when
human evidence is so uncertain. The
law of "an eye for an eye and a
tooth for a tooth" belongs to darker
ages than we pretend ours to be. J
BANKS GROW RICH
BY BOOKKEEPING
(From an Address by Senator
E. F. Ladd.)
The great majority of business
that has been conducted since the
inauguration of the Federal Reserve
System has not been done with
money but has been done with bank
credit.
The big bankers have been able
to easily fool the people in making
a distinction between the two.
Very few men who created debts
and made bank loans during the war
actually borrowed money. They paid
interest just the same, but the
banker did not actually loan them
money.
When we pick up the papers and
read the various bank statements
and look at the statement of deposits
and see that the statement says that
so many dollars are on deposit, that
does not mean that those deposits
represent cash. They do not. To a
large extent they represent cash.
Let me Illustrate: Mr. A. walks
into a bank and says to the cashier,
"1 wish to borrow $10,000. Here is
my note properly indorsed, and it is
such a note as comes within the pro
visions of the Federal Reserve Act."
The cashier says to Mr. A., "Well,
Mr. A., do you wish this in cash or
do you simply wish a checking ac
count?"
Mr. A. replies that he simply wants
the note discounted and placed to
his credit on his checking account.
The loan is granted. The note is
discounted, Mr. A. is credited on the
books with the amount and he pays
his bills by check. His checks are
deposited by his payees in their
various banks—who are engaged in
the same kind of loan transactions.
These cheeks are then passed
through the clearing house and there
"wnshed out" by matching, or check
ing, them against each other and the
banks adjusting their differences in'
cash.
The banks have not loaned money.
They have simply loaned a book
transaction, credit, and are drawing
interest on their system of book
keeping.
It is hardly probable that more
than 5 per centum of cash is re
quired to adjust the differences of,
the banks in the Clearing House
Association.
An interest-bearing debt has been
created solely on the ability of the
banks to keep books, coupled with an
unjust privilege allowed them under
the provisions of the Federal Reserve
Act which permits them to extend or
contract such credit almost at will.
j_ It has been the arbitrary exer
cises of this sovereign function
| placed in the hands of private bank-
25)10 Colby Aye.. Everett, Washington. Opp. Postoffirt!
RUBBERS
For Every Member of
the Family
Women's Toe
Rubbers
Women's Storm
Rubbers
Women's heavy
British Rubbers ...
Women's heavy
rolled-edge Rubbers
Misses' light-weight
Rubbers
Misses' rolled-edge
Rubbers
MEADOWMOOR ICE CREAM
Is Always the Best
MEADOWMOOR DAIRY CO.
1918 HEWITT AYE. MAIN ill
WHITE HOUSE PUBLIC MARKET
THE HOUSE OF QUALITY
ALWAYS FAIR TO ORGANIZED LABOR
MAIN 973
Steinway and Other Fine Pianos—Pianolas
Victrolas, Grafonolas, Edisons
Kin ney ®<S i pprcl I
Service Is Our Hobby
17(15 HEWITT AYE.
All the Records Everett, Wash.
All the Time. Main 797
MR. AND MRS. UNIONIST
Take advantage of our Free Delivery. Phone Main 30 for
the Keal Home Made Sausage and the Best Meat Obtainable,
at Reasonable Prices.
HOME SAUSAGE & MEAT CO.
Strictly Union Market
Let me tailor your next suit for you. You'll get satisfaction
and perfect tailoring at the right price. Union label in each
garment.
JOE PESCH, Tailor, 2830 Colby
USE THE
INTERURBAN SYSTEM
TO SEATTLE—HaIf hourly serv
ice. On the hour and half hour.
TO STANWOOD. MT. VERNON,
BURLINGTON and SEDRO
WOOLLEY—HourIy. 5 minutes
past the hour—7:os a. m. to
7:05 p. m.—9:05 p. m. Saturdaj
and Sunday,
TO BELLINGHAM—Two hourly
at. 9:05. 11:05 a. m., 1:05, 3:05,
5:05, 7:05.
9:05 p. m. except Saturday and
Sunday.
Phone Main 202
PACIFIC NORTHWEST TRAC
TION COMPANY
Depot—Pacific and Colby
ers, that has wrought so much havoc
during the past several months.
We have a repair shop in connec
tion with store and have an expert
repair man in charge of same. We
make a specialty of repairing motor
cycles, bicycles, typewriters, cash
registers, guns and revolvers. We also
do lock, safe and key work. Tele
phone and we will call for your "work
and return same when repaired at
Arthur A. Baily's Sporting Goods a-nd
Hardware Store. Both phones 75.
Smoke Olympia Capitol. 10c straight
HAND-CARVING |
VS. COMPOSITION
The Union Woodcarvers of the
United States need the help of all
organized labor's co-operation in
combatting the ''Composition Ornn
ment EMI. They wish to urge union
men to boy hand-carving. Hence,
they ask all union members when
purchasing furniture, pianos, phono
graphs, etc., to be sure that it is
strictly hand-carved.
Hand-carving is invariably union
made.
Composition-carving is unfailingly
non-union made.
So when union men purchase fur
niture they should be careful and
discriminating by demanding hand
carved furniture. Composition orna
ment is nothing much more than a
colored putty that contracts, ex
pands, cracks and crumbles, and is
moulded by unskilled labor into the
shape of carving. The use of com
position ornament has made the trade
very unreliable for employment; and
has forced carvers to leave the trade
for other occupations; and makes it
:so that apprentices can seldom be in
duced to learn the trade. Therefore
jwe would urge that all union men
give this the widest publicity.
Smoke BLUE RIBBON 5f Cigar.
II Children's Orthopedic Rub-
63c
| bers; .sizes 4 \/-> to
j 101/*
79c
79c
Men's heavy rolled-edge
Rubbers
at
Men's light-weigh! Dress
Rubbers t
at 1
89c
Men's heavy Patrol Rubbers: I
69c
79c
! gray, with red I
I sole <
\ Men's gray-sole i
! Boottee <
HKWITT and OAK LS
BEST EQUIPPED
LAUNDRY
North of Seattle
Best possible laundry work can
only be gotten where the best pos
sible facilities abound. . No laun
dry can do the best grade of work
unless fitted for it. We do not
wish to boast, but in fairness to
our plant we must say it is the
best equipped in the state north of
Seattle, and our prices are low,
too. Following is a few items;
all others similar:
Shirts, up form 10c
Collars 3c
Underwear 10c
Socks _ 5c
MENDING FREE
Rough Dry. lb 6c
Suits. Dry-cleaned, odorless $1.30
less $1.50
PEOPLE'S
LAUNDRY CO.
CLEANERS AND DYERS
Phone Ex. 52 Wall and Grand
Where To Eat
Your Meals Prepared By
Expert Culinary Mechanics
At
GAPFNEY'S C AFE
1507 Hewitt Aye.
Phone Main 997
Everett. Wash.
South Park Grocery
Dealers in
STAPLE AM)
FANCY GROCERIES. GRAIN
AND PRODI ( 1
We carry a complete line of
chicken feed as well as a full
line of groceries.
41st and Colby
Phone Main 46
Holmes' t onlectionerv for Peanut
Brittle.
Page Three.
59c
$1.23
$1.23
$1.49
$2.98
MAIN 973

xml | txt