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The labor journal. (Everett, Wash.) 1909-1976, November 03, 1922, Image 1

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OFFICIAL PAPER
EVERETT CENTRAL
LABOR COUNCIL
VOL. XXXI.
FEDERATION NEWS
REACTIONARIES SUPPRESS
DISCUSSION OF INITIATIVE
AND REFERENDUM MEASURES
That the recationary interests of
the state are becoming alarmed at
the keen interest shown by the vot
ers in the initiative and referendum
measures that will appear on the
ballot at the general election is best
demonstrated by the action of the
Seattle School Board which last
week prohibited the teachers and the!
superintendents of the schools at |
Seattle from using the class rooms,
lor discussion of the merits and de
merits of the 30-10 plan.
Several interesting debates had oc
curred in some of the school houses
and in each instance the supporters
of the measure have received a se
vere trouncing at the hands of the
opponents of the measure and senti
ment among parents of the school
children was becoming unanimous in
support of the measure. Last week
the school board met and issued a
ukase prohibiting the use of the class
looms for discussion of the measure
and at the same time adopting a
resolution denouncing it. The fact
that the school board has confessed
its inability to publicly defend its
position in the matter has tended to ,
still more further cement sentiment
on behalf of the 30-10 measure.
A well-organized plan seems to be
on foot to prevent a fair considera
tion of the referendum measures
that will appear on the ballot, espe
cially the certificate of necessity bill
and the two election measures. The
reactionary press of the state, both
editorially and in their news col
umns, are strongly advocating ap
proval by the voters of referendum
measures 14 and 15, which are aimed
to destroy independent voting in the
state and place the voters at the
mercy of the ruling party machine.
The progressive voters of the state
who are urging the defeat of both
measures have found it almost im
possible to get any space in the re
actionary press of the state for pre
sentation of the evils involved in
both measures. i
The recommendations of the State
Federation of Labor are simple and
should be kept in mind by the work
ers when they go to the polls on
Nov. 7th. They are: Vote "Yes"
on initiative measures 40 and 40.
Vote "Yes" on the constitutional
amendments. Vote "No" on refer- ,
endum measures 12, 14 and 15. i
Bellingham, Olympia and Puyallup
Hold Labor-Forward Rallies
Bellingham, Olympia and Puyallup
labor movements held enthusiastic
labor rallies during the past week.
The Bellingham central labor council
held an open meeting at the regular
session last Thursday night and in
addition to discussing the general
HOW TO VOTE ON REFERENDUM AND
INITIATIVE MEASURES.
INITIATIVE MEASURE No. 40
To Repeal the Poll Tax.
sTJ
FOR
AGAINST I—l
INITIATIVE MEASURE No. 46
To establish the 30-10 School Plan.
s7]
FOR
AGAINST I—l
Certificate of Necessity Hill—Has been prepared and en
acted by the Legislature in the interest of powerful public ser
vice corporations.
FOR L=j
AGAINST L^l
REFERENDUM MEASURE No. 14
An act requiring electors to state their party affiliations
at the time of registration. This act would abolish the right
of independent voting at the primaries.
FOR LJ
AGAINST
REFERENDUM MEASURE No. 15
A sister bill to Referendum No. 14, with the purpose to
carry out more fully the purposes of No. 14.
FOR LJ
AGAINST l^J
THREE PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE
STATE CONSTITUTION
No. 1 and No. 2 deal with minor matters and are not objec
tionable to the general public.
No. :i—Proposed Amendment to the Constitution increasing
compensation of members of the Legislature from $5.00 to
.SIO.OO per day.
y
FOR
AGAINST I—
Vote in Favor of Initiative Measures No. 40
and No. 46.
Vote Against Referendum Measures No. 12,
No. 14 and No. 15.
Vote in Favor of AH the Constitutional
Amendments.
AS RECOMMENDED BY THE WASHINGTON
STATE FEDERA r TON OF LABOR
Vote for Duncan for Senator
:o:
Vote The Farmer-Labor Ticket t
REFERENDUM MEASURE No. 12
problraui of the labor movement and
arranging for organization work was
addressed by several speakers on the
initiative and referendum measures
that will appear on the ballot.
A representative of the schools
spoke on behalf of the 30-10 plan
and urged its adoption. A represen
tative of the medical profession spoke
on referendum measure No. 13 and
discusses its merits and demerits.
<W. J. Bryan, formerly of Bremer
ton and now located at Bellingham,
and who is president of the Direct
Primary League, spoke on referen
dum measures Nos. 14 and 15—the
primary election bills—and urged]
their defeat by the voters. Emil i
Hoff, former president of the Bell
ingham council, and candidate on the
Democratic ticket for the state legis
lature, with the endorsement of
Pellingham labor, spoke briefly on j
behalf of his candidacy. President i
.Short of the State Federation of:
l abor spoke at length on the gen-1
eral strike situation, on the initiative
and referendum measures and on the J
Daugherty injunction, which he bit
terly denounced and urged the work-]
ers to refuse to be governed by its
unconstitutional and unlawful pur
poses.
The Olympia labor movement held
an open meeting Monday evening at
which all of the local unions and or
ganized workers were invited, under
the auspices of the building labor
ers' union. The meeting was in the
nature of a labor-forward rally.
Many new unions have been formed
in recent months at Olympia and
the membership of all other unions
materially increased in the labor
forward drive. The new unions are
affiliating with the State Federation
of Labor and urging 100 per cent
affiliation at Olympia. The meeting
was addressed by Frank Cotterill,
secretary of the Northwest Plumbers
Association and President Short of
the State Federation.
On Monday night the Puyallup
Carpenters and Painters unions held
a joint Hallowe'en social at which
the president of the State Federa
tion of labor was invited to be pres
ent and address them, but which he
was unable to do as a result of a
previous engagement for the Olym
pia meetingc. The signing up of
the Puyallup fair has proven a tre
mendous stimulus in organization
work, particularly among the build
ing trades unions in the berry valley
center. Officers of the State Fed
eration of Labor are planning to
visit Puyallup in the early future
and assist in the labor-forward drive
now under way there.
On Tuesday night an open meeting
was held at South Tacoma, under the
auspices of the steam and operating
engineers, and which was also ad
dressed by the president of the Fed
eration. The Daugherty injunction
and the railroad strike were the prin
cipal subjects of discussion.
Democratic Party:—"He is deceiving you!
Republican Party:—"He is deceiving you!"
CENTRAL LABOR
COUNCIL NOTES
Sixty-two dollars nnd fifty cents was turned over by the Central La
bor Council to the striking shopcrafts at the meeting November 1. This
money was collected through the efforts of the council. Many more prom-
I lies were made by delegates from different organizations for relief by their
unions.
The organization committee reported the reorganization of the retail
clerks. This time the expectations are that they will organize 100 per cent
strong.
An interview with the county engineer by a committee from the coun
cil in reference to the painting of the Everett Avenue bridge was re
ported and further work of the committee will be reported next meeting.
The final and complete report will be published in the Journal later.
A 5-cent car fare in about a month for Everett is to be expected, ac
cording to reliable information received by the Central Council.
On request of the striking shopcrafts the following petition will be
presented to business men of Everett and when filled with a sufficient
number of signatures will be sent to the American Railway Association,
the U. S. Labor Board, and the government of the U. S.
.. . STATEMENT OF FACTS
Since Julylst, 1922 the shopmen employed by the various railroads of
the United States have been on strike as a protest against a cut in wages
and against changed working conditions, as well as rulings of the U. S.
Railway Labor Board.
In tie city of Everett approximately 300 men are now on strike. Most
of these are home owners, taxpayers and heads of families. All of them
are good citizens, honest and industrious, and were virtually driven into
this strike by the action of the companies and the Labor Board.
Believing that the men are justified in the action they have taken,
the business men of Everett have endorsed the following resolution:
BE IT RESOLVED, by the business men of Everett, that we express
our sympathy with the railway shopmen now on strike; that we believe
they have a just cause for complaint and that we call on the American
Railway Association, the U. S. Railway Labor Board, and the Government
of the United States to settle with these men on equitable basis and thus
end a situation which is rapidly becoming intolerable to the whole country-
And as an expression of our belief in the men and in the justice of their
cause, we have hereunto signed our names or the names of the firms with
which we are connected.
FARMER LABOR CANDIDATES
UNITED STATES SENATOR
JAMES A DUNCAN
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS
Second District
P. B. TYLER
STATE SENATOR ( 59th District
W. J. FORTSON
STATE REPRESENTATIVES
19th District
J. E. WRANGE
MARIE LOUISE WENBERG
COUNTY TREASURER
C. W. ROGERS
COUNTY SHERIFF
J. M. VETTER
COUNTY ASSESSOR
LEOTA WHITE
COUNTY COMMISSIONER—FIRST DIST.
HANS THOMPSEN
WHAT THE FARM BUREAU THINKS;
INITIATIVE MEASURE 46,30-10 PLAN
By C W. Orton, President of the i
Farm Bureau. 1
The Farm Bureau is supposed to j
be be a non-partisan, non-political 1
organization. The reason for trying ; <
to keep the Farm Bureau out of 1
partizan politics is obvious. Many 1
of us are governed, in our political
affiliations, by tradition and preju- i
dice. Many are influenced by nar- <
rowly selfish motives. People thus i
influenced are not amenable to rea- (
son, and feel keenly, often bitterly. :
They are easily alienated from a ]
new organization that opposes the 1
policies to which they may Individ
ually be committed. 1
The Farm Bureau is treading on (
dangerous ground when it takes a <
stand for or against the 30-10 plan, t
which in general public interest and |
feeling overshadows all other issues j I
in the coming election. And yet the i
state executive committee has twice 1
passed a resolution condemning the |
30-10 plan and Pierce county execu
tive committee has passed a resolu- I
tion commending 30-10. In Pierce
county at least, both sides may find
consolation.
Since the Farm Bureau has al- '
ready mixed in the fray, the writer,
who has no children and who pays
more taxes than the average tax
payer, feels at liberty to relieve him
self of a few thoughts on the ques- <
tion.
Let me say in the beginning that
I have read the proposal and the
arguments issued by the state; have
listened to a debate between Or.
Penrose and Mr. Swettman; have
read Mr. Montgomery's editorials in
the Puyallup Valley Tribune and
many other articles bearing on this
subject. I have tried to get every
possible point of view so that I
might be in a position to decide in
telligently and as free as possible
from prejudice whether or not 30-10
would be a good thing for the state
as a whole.
My first and most obvious "(inclu
sion is that it has been reduced to a
tax question nnd the welfare of the
children has been lost sight of, es
pecially by the opposition. Districts
that will receive back more than
they pay in, are in favor of 30-10
while those that receive back less
than they pay are opposed.
The opposition has not tried to be
fair, but has tried to frighten and
stampede the tax-payers with the
statement, direct and implied that
this measure will add $3,750,000 to
E VIC RETT, WASHINGTON,! KIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1922
DOTH RIGHT
$4,000,000 to their taxes. They have
tried to confuse the voters with ir
relevant figures and comparisons and
by a counter proposal which they
cannot assure us of being able to
pass and which, on the face of it,
would be inadequate.
The "big noise" in the opposition
is a group of corporations and oth
er large tax-payers who do not live
in the school district in which much
of their property is located. They
are not interested in educating other
people's children and they are afraid
to trust to the school boards.
So far as I have observed, the op
position has not attacked the prin
ciple involved in the 30-10 proposal,
which is that, for school purposes,
taxes should be collected where the
property is, and distributed where
the children are. Therefore, I feel
safe in assuming that 30-10 is right
in principle. 1 am willing to sup
port a proposition that is right in
principle, even though it may af
fect my pocketbook adversely.
But as I said in the beginning, it
j has been turned into a tax question,
and each voter wants to know, if he
has not already made up his mind,
whether or not it will increase his
taxes. Therefore I shall attempt
to make in the following paragraphs,
a fair statement of what 30-10 will
do and may do to our taxes.
Our school taxes are levied three
ways—by the state, by the county
and by the school district. 30-10
means that the state shall raise $30
per census child in the state, and
the county shall raise $10 per census
child in the county. At the present
time that state is raising $20 per
child and the county $10. This is a
50 per cent increase in the state
levy. But the amount received by
each district from the state will like
wise be Irnceased 60 per cent, ex
cepting nidations due to discontinu
ing pay for attendance in private
schools and apportionment for tearh
ers as well as pupils.
Each school board makes out a
budget for each ensuing year. The
essential feature of this budget are
as follows:
(itemized)
Estimated expenditures $
Estimated receipt from state
school fund $.
Estimated receipt from coun
ty $
Amount to be raised by dis
trict levy $
The local district levy is the last
Woman Candidate
The Most Active of
F.-L. Candidates
MARIE LOUISE WENBERG
"Wring out the profits and oper
ate for service." is the slogan of
Marie Louise Wenberg, Farmer-La
bor nominee for state representa
tive from the 4i)th district.
Marie Louise Wenberg, candidate
for the farmer-labor nomination for
state representative from the 4!>th
district, is prominent in county civic
affairs and is a charter member of
the Snohomish County Legislative
Federation and the Stanwood W. C.
T. U. She also belongs to the Mon
day Study Club of Stanwood.
She has taught school several
years in this state and for three
years she was matron of the Old
People's home at Stanwood.
Although she is the mother of
two children and does the ordinary
work of the farm wife, Mrs. Wen
berg finds time to take an active
interest in civic affairs.
For 31 years Mrs. Wenberg has
actually lived upon the farm and is
thoroughly familiar with the needs
of the farmer. Her knowledge of
conditions and parliamentary law,
her friends believe, should make her
qualified for the legislature.
item in the budget and is bound to
be considered in connection with the
other items of receipts. With the
present insistent demand for en
trenchment and lowering of taxes,
do you suppose that these school
boards are going to make the same
district levy as the year before?
Neither do I. Excepting in cases
where they have been unable to raise
enough under the old law, these
school boards are going to retrench.
My judgment is that the total ex
penditures for school purposes in
the state during the first year 30-10
is in operation will be somewhat less
than during the preceding year, due
to the demand for retrenchment.
My judgment is substantiated by
figures from the office of the state
auditor and the state superintendent
of schools which shows that the state
support in 1922 was $1,761,346.65
greater than in the year 1921. Did
the school district of the state of
Washington spend that much addi
tional money. The actual figures show
us that they did not. They not
only raised the $1,761,346.65 less
money locally than before. If school
boards cut expenditures under "20
--10", I believe that we are safe in
saying that at least they will not
increase under "30-10."
But some districts are going to
spend much more money than here
tofore. Where will this money come
from? It will come from the "rich"
district, those "rich in property but
poor in children." And the richer
they are the harder they fight
against a plan to help educate the
less fortunate children of our state.
Smoke Olympia Capitol, 10c straight
WE DON'T
PATRONIZE
LIST
BARBER SHOPS
1. H Tumor, 1104 Hewitt.
Bern hart Shop, Monroe.
BUILDING LABORERS
L. Stark*. Emil IMtetmbaeh, Phillip*-
COFFEE AVI) TEA HOUSES
Manning's Cofrfee House on Hewitt betweel,
Colby and Wetmore.
REST AC RANTS AND CAFES
Montgomery's lee Cream Parlor, -822 Col
by aver.ue.
Maryland Cafe. 290S Hewitt.
i ONOKNBKD V.ILK
lobby, McNeil A l.ibby. Packers and Cun
ncrs.
Curn*tion. Aster. Mt. Vernon and Wash
ington Brands.
Yakima City Creamery.
CONTRACTORS
R Bogstade. mgr. Columbia College.
Columhia Odlege.
Reril and Willard and building 23rd *tre*t
and Maple.
Brail Larson, Carpenter.
H. Maves and I, Hoffler. carpenters.
ELECTRICIANS
F. R. Hare, electrical contractor: John
Thue«on.
FISB COMPANIES
San Juan Fish Co., Seattle
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
Butler*.
MEAT MARKETS
A. C. Snider, the Rural Butcher, in Mid
wax Market.
Star Meat Market. l'Mh and Wetmore.
PH'MBERS
Wm. Plambeek.
Joe Walleni and his house at the corner
of 3026 I*>mbard.
LAUNDRIES
Independent, Standard, Union, Paris and
X rieger*.
PAINTERS
Rainwater A Son, Painter*.
A. J. Jones, Sign Painter.
Stein Bros., painter*.
MISCELLANEOUS
O W Ward, Cement Worker.
M. Anderson.
Mr Burden and his house, 2511 Maple
Btreet.
F. S Ijing Manufacturing Co., of Seattl*.
Union Oil Service Station, Cor. Rucker
and Pacific.
Mr. Burns and building at 41st and Ruek
er avenue.
G. N Gay Furniture Store. 2003 Hewt't
Smoke Olympia St. Rigis. 10c, ll
for 25c • dv .
A BUGLE CALL TO DUTY
BY AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR NATIONAL NON
PARTISAN POLITICAL CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE
A campaign of unusual importance is drawing to a close.
National and state officials are to be elected on Tuesday, Novem
ber 7. In practically every electorial district in the nation the
choice lies between progress and reaction.
Congress is now in the hands of reaction; it has performed
no service for the people. Instead it has tried by every trick
and device to serve predatory interests.
There is a somewhat popular impression that only those
elections are of supreme importance in which a president is to
be elected. That is not the case. This election—and every elec
tion—is of supreme importance if the issue is between progress
and reaction. •
Consider the congress as it has been. Not a single con
structive measure has been made into law. On the contrary, one
reactionary proposal after another has been brought forward.
There have been sufficient friends of the public interest in con
gress to prevent enactment into law of the most vicious meas
ures, but not enough of them to take command and enact con
structive measures.
This congress has flown the flag of profiteers, of the ex
ploiters, of the buccaneers. It has flouted the interests of the
interests of the working people, of the farmers, of the army of
small salaried men and women who are so largely and so pitifully
without, means of protecting their own interests.
This congress must not be the next congress. There must
be changes before it is too late. Plundering must stop. There
should be in congress of the United States a statesmanship of
the highest order and sterling integrity. There should be initia
iative and constructive purpose and this should be made manifest
in foreign affairs as well as in domestic affairs. It is unthink
able that the next congress should repeat a situation in which
the people have had to fight with unremitting energy and un
failing vigilance for the slightest semblance of recognition, while
privilege has been watched and cared for with jealous solicitude.
Men and women who have proven themselves true to the
public welfare are available for election in almost every district,
both in the national and state contests. The workers and all oth
er liberty-loving people should rally to these defenders of free
dom and of progress.
It is of the utmost importance that every workingman and
woman, every man and woman in the factory, on the farm or
anywhere, who believes in progress and justice and freedom,
should cost a vote on November 7 for the candidates who are
true to these principles.
It is not a question of parties; it is a question of principles.
Labor is loyal to principles and it seeks always to protect and
1 advance those principles.
Reaction has been in the saddle. Workers of America, throw
out reaction. Put progress in!
Know your enemies and defeat them; stand faithfully by
your friends and elect them.
, Our republic needs honesty and understanding and con
structive ability in the next congress. It needs a congress that
will fight for the people and not against the people.
Make this the hour of destiny for progress and humanity
and freedom and democracy!
Make this the hour of victory!
SAMUEL GOMPERS,
FRANK MORRISON,
JAS. O'CONNELL,
Executive Committee,
National Non-Partisan Political Campaign Committee.
LOCAL UNIONS
Cooks and Waiters
The dance held under the auspices
of this union was a success as re
ported by officials of the union.
Next Monday night the members will
all be present at a social meeting
to be held in the big upstairs hall of i
the Labor Temple. Other members
of organized labor are also invited,
and members can bring their friends.
After the meeting there will be a
dance. Meeting dates are changed
to the first and second Tuesdays of
the month in the upstairs hall.
Street Carmen
At their last meeting this organ
ization donated $f>!>.oo to the strik
ing shopcrafts. The first union to
respond to the move started in the
Central Labor Council.
Retail Clerks
Reorganized Wednesday night. Xo- '
vember 1. As temporary officer:;
were elected L. T. Johnson president
and H. M. Mead secretary. A new
charter is sent for and it is esti
mated the membership will reach the
200 mark in the near future.
Laundry Workers
Last Thursday, October 2<">. a 100
per cent attended meeting was he'd
at the Labor Temple, and two new
members were initiated. A new sec
retary was elected. A social meet
ing followed the short business ses
sion.
Typographical
Report no idle men in Everett. The
extra men are working more time
than the regulars. Looks good.
Anti War League
Every Friday night this organiza
tion will meet at the Public Library
auditorium. Everybody is welcomed
and good speakers on the anti-war
subject will be in attendance in fu
ture meetings. Last Friday night
the Rev. George Bowler addressed
the meeting.
Rev. Bowler was a captain with the
British army in four wars and spent
ceveral years in India and Africa.
He spoke lengthy on the present
war between the Turks and Greeks.
Many prominent speakers will dis
cuss the war subject in future meet
ings.
PUBLISHED IN
THE INTEREST OF
ORGANIZED LABOR
STATE OPENS
OFFICE HERE
The- state department of labor and
industries opened offices in the Bank
of Commerce building November 1.
This office will be a branch of the
Seattle office which has Jurisdiction
over King, Snohomish. Kitsap, Jef
ferson, Clallam and Island counties.
Director Edward Clifford of the
department of labor and industries
decided to open the Everett office in
recognition of the large payrolls in
this city and the great amount of
business to take up with the depart
ment affecting employers and work
men in Everett.
J. E. Campbell, well known in la
bor circles, is in charge of the Ev
erett branch office and urges all
persons who have any business to
take with the department to call up
on him at the office in the Com
merce building.
The Everett office will assemble
accident reports and all persons get
ting permits to do any building are
required to submit an estimate of
their extra hazardous payrolls at
this office before beginning opera
tions. Labor claims and all matters
connected with industrial safety,
medical aid and industrial insurance
will also be handled by the local
office.
Smoke BLUE RIBrtON V Cigar.
"LABOR" RAPPED
FOR SUPPORTING
CANDIDATE DILL
Everett, Wash.. Oct. 31, 1922.
Editor of Everett Labor Journal.
Dear Sir:—The following article
in support of C. C. Dill will be found
in Labor October 28, 1922:
Vote For Dill. In order to de
feat Miles Poindexter it will he nec
essary for the workers of the State
of Washington to concentrate on one
candidate.
In the judgment of Labor that can
didate should be C. C. Dill, former
congressmen, who capture the dem
ocratic nomination in the recent pri
maries.
Dill served two terms in congress
(Continued on page 4)
NO. 27

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