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The Washington socialist. (Everett, Wash.) 1914-1915, May 14, 1914, Image 3

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Tlutrsilay. May 14. l!'l \
Patronize Washington Socialist
Advertisers and Tell Them About It
$$$$$$$*$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
: We Still Have the Largest I
: Bargains in Town
Z in SUITS, COATS, DRESSES and
* MILLINERY. Prices cut as Z
* never before on men's
» union made suits Z
r TODAYS STYLES TODAY
1812 HEWITT
EVERETT'S RELIABLE CREDIT HOUSE
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
BACHELDER® CORNEIL
Better Clothes
for Men and Boys
\', Ladies and Gentlemen— ! >
i . Manicuring, facial massage, < >
' ; scalp treatment, first class ''
•< ,i\ hairdresslng, goiters treated ] ',
i • successfully. Experts only. I >
;; MRS. B. C. REIS "
4 413 Colby Bldg. 8. S. 629 ..
»♦»♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦»»♦»»»««»♦♦»♦♦■
The Maize
CAFE
Carl A. Schlettweln, Mgr.
EVERETT'S POPULAR
CAFE
(Under New Management)
/, - ■ ; . H(i :■. _
Quick —Open Day
and Night
Wetmore and Hewitt
: The White Stone Baths.
■ ; J. O. SHAKPLESS, Prop. |
] ' Barber Shop and Bithi %
j; 1905 HEWITT v'; ♦
Pioneer-Alpine Dairy
rreth Milk and Cream Delirert« to AH
Parts of the City
lad 4032 . SuaMt ISM
1908 Lombard Are.
<■■ '■"■»
THE EVERETT DAIRY
for rich freoh milk, cream or
butter
Phones: Ind. 708 X, Sunset 016
<£ « "» »» »■■■»■» !«■»« )
"*"""*' •■*——*•——■—■*——*■•■■• »■.». « '■■'»/
OWL PHARMACY
! For Pure Drugs
Courteous Treatment — Free
Delivery
Both Phones 876
1607 Hewitt Aye.
The Horseshoe
BAR
1805 Hewitt Avenue—
Commerce Building
COOK AND ZAEPFEL
THE ICE CREAM SEASON
is now on. We make the best. We also carry everything In the
dairy line at reasonable prices.
Meadowmoor Dairy, 1916 Hewitt
>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<
GEM DYE WORKS
The most modern egulpped plant in Snokoroish county. Ladles' or
gents' suits cleaned and pressed, $1.00. Why pay more? Expert tailor
for alterations
2810 WETMORE AYE. PHONES: Ind. 663 X, 8. S. 516
Weiser's Grill 1
I A Good Place To Eat 1
W. J. WEISER. Prop. . 1
DR. K. I. KOBBERVIG
DENTIST
4068 Commerce Bldg.
Phones: Ind. 163, Sun. 436
,•> Stop in and see the new at- «>
■V mosphere that prevails at the <?
I NEW VIENNA BAKERY I
|> Now under the management of X
•> B. F. DANIELS, 1409 HEWITT §>
I Phones: Sun. 979, Ind. 615Z T

$ WORKINGMAN'S CLOTH- I
I ING HOUSE $
■■ Men's, women's and children's ■••
4 shoes Big values for little %
% money. X
I 2014 Hewitt Ind. Phone 755 4
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦I
; Buy your bread, cakes, pies, etc. x
from w
; BCANDIA BAKERY I
2727 Chestnut J>
: I
»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»♦»»♦♦♦»»♦♦
?»»--■■■»■»»■»..--.-.-.--■
CARL REICHELT, Prop.
COMMERCE BARBER SHOP
Commerce Bldg., Everett, Walk.
Two Gooi Bath*
<^v^A^AAAA^A^■mrt/l/frSAWifr iA&§
j Thompson's |
$ Hewitt Aye., Near Maple St. 4
X Something for Everybody %
4> «
f— — — —. » j^- » j • «»*■»•■*■«»»* A h A a _. m * A X _ _>
: CITY DRUG STORE
1910 Hewitt Aye.
Free delivery to any part of !
the city. Ask for Green Trading
Stamps.
.a, •.•■••■....■•••■■*••*■.
«.»..•■■•.■•■■•■-•■■•»•■-•-••••.-••••«•..•..••■•■••"••«.■••■••••-•-<«
EVERETT DRUG CO.
! Wine* and Liquors for Medical
and Family Use Free Delivery
; RUCKER AND HEWITT
| Both Phones 51
FREE LEGAL
DEPARTMENT OF THE
WASHINGTON SOCIALIST
Q-—Please make clear to me, in the
columns of the Washington 8oclall»t,
or by mall, the legal point* of the fol
lowing situation:
An electric wire on poles In the
public road In front of my property
was broken by a root thrown when
blasting a stump on my property. The
Everett Railway, Light and Water Co.,
leasers from the Puget Sound Interna
tional Railway and Power Co., of the
electric line, sent me a bill for the re
pairing of the wire, Itemized as fol
lows:
3 linemen, 4| j hours each, $4.00
per 9 hours $ 6.00
1 helper, 5 hours, $2.25 per 9
hours 1.25
1 helper, 11J,-j hours, 28c per
hour 3.22
31 lbs. No. 6 D. B. W. P. copper
wire : 6.48
$16.95
Plus 10' ;• for Supt.—use of tools 1.70
$18.65
I consider this excessive for the fol
lowing reasons: I notified them be
fore beginning of my intention to
blow stumps, so they could easily lo
cate any trouble I might cause, and a
man was sent out in the morning to
awaist any possible Injury. I pre
sume his time Is included in the bill;
also presume the time for all work
men Is Included from leaving office
until reporting back, as the actual
work of repairing was done In less
than an hour by five men. The tools
used were some pliers and some spurs
for climbing poles. The ax used was
furnished by me.
The wire taken out was carried off
by the workmen and Its value as junk
copper, if of equal weight to the one
replacing It as per the bill, would be
$3.10.
Must I pay this bill? If so, how can
I best proceed to have it lowered?
Can a counter bill be presented with
any probability of results.
J. M. H.
A.—l don't think you have to pay
the bill. However, if it was done
"through want of proper care" on your
part, then you would be liable to the
company for the actual damages sus
tained. If you had failed to notify the
company, and had used such a heavy
charge of powder that a reasonable
man would not have used Buch a
charge, then you would liable.
Write the company telling them that
you had used proper care in the mat
ter, and that you will not pay. If they
Insist, refer them to your adviser.
EXPERT ESTIMATES COST OF
WAR WITH MEXICO AT
$2,000,000 EVERY DAY.
Asked for an opinion as to the prob
able money cost of a war with Mexico,
Congressman James Hay, chairman of
the military committee of the U. S.
house of representatives, answered
that this would, of course, depend upon
the number of men called out, and this
no one knows.
"We have a standing army, the full
strength of which is 100,000. The cost
of its maintenance, In time of peace,
is $100,000,000 a year.
"The military appropriation bill, just
passed, carries that amount. In time
of war the increased destruction of
equipment and other added expense
will swell this figure to at leant $150,
--000,000.
"Supposing that the president calls
for 250,000 volunteers —the cost of
maintenance of this army—pay, sub
sistence, transportation, animals —will
be at least $500,000,000 a year. This
makes a total of $650,000,000 a year
for an armed land force of 350,000
men —the least number, I suppose, that
could be considered for a war with a
country of Mexico's size and topo
graphy.
"These figures are conservative. I
give them as an absolute minimum.
The cost of an army of the size named
may prove to be a great deal more
than I have estimated.
"It may very easily run up to $2,
--000,000 a day, and there is no telling
but that IT MIGHT GO TO A GREAT
DEAL HIGHER THAN THAT! And
rfiiicrnber, also, that, a considerably
larger force may be found necessary."
LITERATURE DISTRIBUTION.
There will be a distribution of liter
ature next Sunday, May 17, 1914.
Bundles may be, had Friday and Sat
urday. Call at the headquarters for
yours. Come out and help make a
thorough distribution.
CARL ULONSKA,
Chairman Organization Committee.
DAIRY SUPPLY
2008 HEWITT
BUTTER, EGGS, CHEESE
THE WASHINGTON SOCIALIST
BRUTALITY OF CAPITALIST
SCHOOL BOARD.
Bhown In Resolution! Adopted at
Trafton April 26, 1914.
At n iii.-i- v meeting of more tlinn a
hundred and fifty residents of School
DtltriOl No. Ml, Hnoliomlsli county,
Washington, held at. Trafton school
house on April 16, 1914, aTler fuM dls
OUlliOfl the following preamble and
rcMolutlonH wrro unanimously adopt
ed:
In tho good your L9lB, the present
president of the school bourd of dls-
Irlct No. .'lOl Introduced a resolution
Into a public, meeting of the patrons,
teachers ami directors of tills district,
declaring that, our schools must be
free from both political and religious
partisanship. It carried unanimously.
It Ih ciiHtonmry where non-partisan
Hhlp Ih the rule, to proportion appoint
meiilH very closely to the vote cast by
the several parties, giving the minor
ity a representation about propor
Honed to the vole It cast as, for ex
ample, In chhc of election boards, fed
eral and state eoitinilHHlons and the
like. Any other scheme of appointing
' manifestly partisan and marks an
almolute return to the old and dis
carded Rpolls Ryntom.
Somotlmea, In (he Interest of lion
partisanship, the majority has boon
known to reverse this rule. As an In
stance, we point with pride to the fact
that under (he administration of a So
cialist majority on the school board
the distribution of teachers was much
more generous to their opponents; for
bo it remembered, out of twenty-six
teachers employed then only five were
Socialists.
Fake "Non-Partlsanshlp."
The present board Is actuated by
absolutely opposite views. It appar
ently believes that "non-partlsanshlp"
means the entire exclusion of one
party from participation in the school
management. Therefore, under the ef
ficient leadership of the authoress of
those magnanimous (?) "non-parti
san" resolutions the present school
board has acted upon a plain and un
disguised determination not to give
the minority party any—not even the
least — representation upon the faculty
of our schools. •
To prove this let the facts be sub
mitted.
Sinclair and his wife have both
been refused re-employment. Yet
their school work, notwithstanding the
Interruptions which these "non-parti
sans" forced upon them, has been ab
solutely successful according to the
testimony of their patrons; and even
George Lancaster-has admitted it both
publicly and privately. The excuse in
the case of J. E. Sinclair Is that he
said something about a flag pledge,
which pledge was afterward abandon
ed. What he said was uttered before he
came here and while he was not teach
ing; and the state superintendent
ruled that ho had a right to say it.
Hut we Insist that this excuse is hypo
critical and that the real and true rea
son for his separation from our school
by this "non-partisan" board is noth
ing but his politics; and In proof of
this, his wife is also separated from
our schools although it does not ap
pear that she EVER said anything to
which any member of the board or any
patron or any person of any party ob
jects. If one is a Socialist, it is just
as fatal to keep quiet as it 1b to talk.
Five Socialists Victims of the Class
Struggle In the Public Schools.
Mrs. Hallberg was victimized by the
writer of the "non-partisan" resolu
tions in a personal interview, although
no objectionable word of hers has ever
been cited, or can be.
And now, disregarding a practically
unanimous petition from the patrons
of Trafton school, which certainly cer
tifies their popularity and efficiency,
both the McKees, husband and wife,
are denied re-employment. No word
of theirs Is cited as obnoxious, or can
be.
Wo point to the fact that these
teachers are acknowledged to be the
peers of any for efficiency and success
ful school work. Moreover, Mrs.
Lizzie Jones, county superintendent of
this county, is committed in thiß par
ticular by her recommendation, par
ticularly in the case of Slncliar.
While these five Socialists were de
nied re-employment, no other Social
ists have been employed to take their
places or to represent the more than
a third of the voteß cast at the last
election for Socialist candidates.
With these facts before them, can
any candid persons doubt the sinister
and partisan character of this cru
sade? Especially involving, as it does,
Socialist teachers and none other?
Now in the face and upon the au
thority of this statement of facts, be it
Resolved, that we denounce the bit
ter and brutal partisanship of the
school board and brand it for its hy
pocrisy and sinister rule; but
Deposed Teachers All Enjoyed Confi
dence of the Community.
Resolved, that we profess wo are In
no way surprised; for "'twas ever
thus" through all the ages, and 'twill
ever be in this wise just as long as
the class struggle continues. The
masters and their minions never did —
they never will—they CANNOT fight
fair bMMIM ft fair fight would only
Moomptlab Uwlr own overthrow.
Id'Kolvcd, that tho attitude of t.h
(own .if Arlington, In so far as It sup-
POTU thlH hypocritical and partlßan
policy, vail particularly in tho ease of.
Mm McKpcb, a policy which in inevit
ably oppmtlYa toward tho rural dls
trlctH which are BOttbOM of this con-
Rolldaled dlHtrlct, shows had faith
and an extremely selfish and ungener
ous disposition. Such i ■ • ;.,>. Is
not good or conducive to peace and
harmony.
Unsolved, that we now have no re
course, save our own clasß solidarity
and such show of that strength and
OOUngt which our union of purpose
makes. We recommend a "petition In
boots"—a general gathering o f the
memherß of our clans in this district ;
for the purpose of presenting our '
grievance to tho superintendent and
also to tho board IF WK CAN BVBH
OATCH THEM jn SESSION!
ItoHolved, that in any event we re
new our allegiance to the noble cause
for which these teachers suffer and
extend to them our hearty hands as
sympathetic comrades.
THOMB .IKNSRN,
Committee.
"THIS RESOLUTION MEANS
WAR," SAID KENT.
Representative Kent of California Is *
tho one member of congress who told i
the whole truth when he voted against !
the resolution permitting intervention.
What ho said is this:
"This man Huerta, who has been I
branded uk a bandit, a traitor, and a i
murderer by our government, has been
Mkad to make an apology, an apology .
aH head of a responsible nation, and
this demand has come to us through a
subordinate In the navy. What absurd
logic Is this that we are called upon to
Indorse? The man whom we do not
recognize as the responsible head of
tho Mexican government has apolo- I
glzcd, the man who committed the of- (
IMM of arresting American sailors
has been punished, and now because,
forHooth, a little more gunpowder will
not be burned than this particular
underling in the navy said ought to
be burned, we are declaring war.
"This resolution means war, and
nothing short of it. This is not a
declaration of peace. This is not a
declaration against one man. It is to
every man who knows Mexico a decla
ration of war against the whole peo
ple of Mexico, and nothing else, for
the moment we put armed forces into
Mexico all the forces of radical an
tipathy, all of the old historic strug
gles will be revived, and we shall find
that we shall have to take the coun
try and rule it."
Automobile and Gas Engine hand
books at Hill's Book Store, 2929 Colby
Aye.
The best Coffee for the money Is
our Favorite Blend, 3 lbs. for $1.00 or
IXA lbs. for 60 cents M. H. Clausen
2812 Rockefeller. Telephones 581.
No. 2867.
NOTICE.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE
STATE OP WASHINGTON IN
AND FOR THE COUNTY OK 'sNO
HOMISH.
In the matter of the Estate of John
Lykins, Deceased.
Notice is hereby given that Charles
C. Bishop, Administrator of the Estate
of John Lykins, deceased, has filed In
this court for settlement his final ac
count as such administrator, together
with his petition for final distribution
of said estate, and that the hearing of
the same has been fixed by the Judge
of said court for Saturday, the 23rd
day of May, 1914, at ten o'clock A.M.
of said day, at the court room of De
partment No. 2 of said court, in the
City of Everett, County of Snohomish,
and State of Washington, and all per
sons interested in said estate are noti
fied then and there to appear and
show cause, if any they have, why
the said account should not be settled
and allowed, and why distribution of
said estate should not thereupon be
Immediately made to the persons en
titled thereto without further notice
of proceedings.
Dated April, 21st, 1914.
W. F. MARTIN,
Clerk.
SHERWOOD & MANSFIELD,
Attorneys for Administrator,
309-10-11 Colby Building,
Everett, Washington.
Date of first publication April, 23rd
1914. 6t
KITTLESON GROCERY CO.
Good Things to Eat
Phones: Ind. 47, Sun. 1540.
1701 Wetmore Aye.
Do You Want a Bargain In
BOOKS
A 33-volume set of the Ency
clopedia Britanica. and a 32
--volume set of the Makers of His
tory—s2s takes the bunch.
HILL'S BOOK STORE
2929 Colby
An Economical Place to Trade
MODEL SAMPLE
No More $2.50 No Lest
SHOE COMPANY
For Men For Women
The Upstairs Shoe Shop That
Saves You Dollars
How do we do It? Small expenses
IjOW rent, no clerks to pay
FOBEB BUILDING. Room 18
Next Door to Star Theater
1806-1808 Hewitt Avenue
UPSTAIRS
\ GOLDFINCH BROTHERS I
j> Wall Papers, Paints, Glass |
■ 2812 Rucker Avenue $
?"..■/ <fc
I Both Phones 285 f
We recommend
WEINAND'S PHOTOS
2800 Watmore
• .We recommend you to the—.
; HOTEL HOLTON
. Rooms are nice, large, pleasant \
■ and modern.
I 2928 Wetmore . . f
> Phones: Buntet, 646; Ind., 953 X !
Coroner's Office
JOHN F. JERREAD
Undertaker and Embalmer
State License No. 3
Phone Main 330 Everett, Wn. i
Upholstering. Furniture Repair- I
•••<■".'-';. ing 1
SVARRER BROS. |
2811 Wetmore I
Linoleum and Carpets Laid I
! t
. > For Harness and Auto;
$i*3C9rT! Tire Repairing Try the*.
' 111 11 f
! rjMj A RIVERSIDE HARNESS
iIU shop :
> .'
> 1 &
>• Carpenters' and mechanics' <•
> tools, small locks, hinges, build- "I.
' Ing, builders' and shelf hardware. <§
\ ARTHUR BAILY ;
> Sporting Goods and Hardware '*''
: J. C. SOVDE ;
', GROCERIES, DRY GOODS AND \
NOTIONS I
1 3419 Everett Aye., Cor. Summit .
; Phones: S. S. 1818, Ind. 470 I
The City Grocery
Staple and Fancy Groceries, Flour, Feel, Produce, Etc.
Botk Phone* til 34i0- l a Everett Avenn*
JOHNSON & lILJKNBERG
WEINZ <a
EDSBERG
GROCERIES & PROVISION
Standard goods at reasonable
prices. We pay no rent or
clerk hire and can sell as
cheap as the cheapest. Give
us a trial and be convinced.
Cor. 37th and Rucker. 1
Phones Ind. 492, S. S. 684 f
I JILG'S GERMAN SAUS- I
I AGE AND DELICATESSEN I
!JILG'S STORE SAUS- X.
AGE AND DELICATESSEN 1
STORE !
| 1914 HEWITT AYE. i
| Opposite Mitchell Hotel |
PULT-08T AND DRY MUTTON.
TRY THESE. AT EIDEM'S GROC
tRY. 2709 LOMBARD. ;.;;
thueson" grocery' bo.' t
Agent Dr. Fahrn«y Medicine*
Groceries, Flour, Feed, Fruit and
Vegetable*
1209 Hewitt Avenue
Phone*: Ind. 14X, Sunset 1354
♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»»♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»
f ♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»
': AT m
*' BJEL^39fIHT *'
j; STEVENS FITS THE EYES \'>
:, and his charges for glasses are ' '
o less i;
;; 2004 HEWITT AYE. J|
Patre Three.
THE BRODECK CO.
Shoes
Every line shown by us repre
sents the leading makes most
becoming your individual style.
New Spring Lasts in
Shoes and Oxfords
FOR
Ladies
Men and
Children
Complete Lines Men's Work
Shoes
The Brodeck Co
CORNER HEWITT AND
WETMORE
S. A H. Green Stamps
PETERSON FURNITURE
COMPANY
Complete Housefurnlshera
Cor. Hewitt and Lombard
A ■■■■■■[■■■■■Ifl
♦•♦»♦»♦•»»♦♦»«♦♦♦»♦»♦»♦♦♦<
i i g. McAllister :
< Practical Interior and Exterior <
! ; Decorator J
i i Fine Paper Hanging a Specialty«
' ' Shop and Residence 2222 Baker'
! I "■.■: Aye. Phone Ind. 609 Y. !
»♦»»♦♦♦»•♦♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦
Loren Thomas Frank Vallier
PARIS LAUNDRY
We gauarantee all : our work
and prices are right
2818 Grand Avenue
Phones 1157
■ .■■;....< ,-.... ~, ..,..:
J»JItJtJtJItJ»JIIJ»JItJ»JtJIIJ/tJtJItJ»JII^
* THE COMMERCIAL PRESS I
% -. - Printers of Fine Stationery *
J The Only Rubber Stamp Works %
In Snohomlsh County. %
2931 Lombard—Phone Ind. 162Y |
£ S* .* ..1 J* Jt ** Jt Jt jt Jt ..*,!* Jt Jt Jt J* ,
Bargreen's Golden Drip Coffee, Im
perial Tea Co. •- •. , 7:
. World Almanac 1914 at Hill's Book
Store, 2929 Colby.
■ WOLD BROS. & WEST-H
■ LUND ■
H Nineteenth and Broadway I
H Dealers in Fancy and I
I Staple Groceries, Dry Goods, I
■ DruK-., Grain, Feed & Flour. I
H Sun. 357 Ind. 315 I
I EDW. ECKLUND
I Dealer in Fancy and Staple <'
: GROCERIES < •
; 2707 Wetmore
f CHARLES L. UNDBLAD $
'? Staple and Fancy Groceries, '«•
■i Frulti, Flour, Hay and Feed <|
Sun. 1064, Ind. 465 X
;v LOWELL WABH. '
HIGH SCHOOL GROCERY
Both Phone* 1166—25 th & Colby
HIGH GRADE GROCERIES
Our Motto, Quality and Service
|* -t
MOON & REEP
Successors to
REEP GROCERY .. ..
1912 Hewitt Aye.
■ Phones: Sunset 197, Ind. 437
Good Groceries at
I NEVILLE & STUMFALL I
& 1901 Broadway %
> Phonea: Sun»et 214, Ind. 612 t

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