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The Washington socialist. (Everett, Wash.) 1914-1915, November 12, 1914, Image 1

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THE WASHINGTON
&0 per oopy, $1.00 per your.
Triumph of Reactionaries Offset by Material Soci
Great Number of Socialist Officials are Electe
NEW YORK ELECTS FIRST
SOCIALIST CONGRESSM
MEYER LONDON TO SUCCEED
BERGER AS LONE SOCIALIST IN
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.
Comrade Meyer London was elected
to congress from the l.th district of
New York. He received the magnifi
cent total of 5,969 votes Goldfogle
got Mt, and Borowaky, candidate oil
the republican . ticket, got but 1,133.
Ii was work like, this that tied I knot
in the Timor's tail.
The Call ml] a;
'. Efficient organization work won the
-.lay for Socialism in the 18th. It was
loyalty. It was sacrifice.
Things Brant without a hitch. There
were more than sufficient workers, al
ways on hand to handle any situa
tion that might present itself. Their
wonderful team work protected the
Socialist ticket in Tammany's strong
hold. That helps to explain why the
Socialists won their first great victory
in the Beat, sending a New York
Working- Class Representative to con
gress.
Two years ago Meyer London was
elected to congress from the 12th dis
trict and cheated of his election by
the thugs, ballot bos stuffers and
strong arm men with which Tammany
Hall operates in that region.
' London is a prominent member of
the Cloakmakers' Union. He is a Rus
sian by birth. 38 years of age. He
has been in the United States twenty
years.
MEYER LONDON WELL
QUALIFIED, SAYS "CALL"
Editorially the Call says:
Though the Socialist party puts lit
tle emphasis on candidates personally, j
and by no means regards office as
the reward of a "deserving" person,
it may be asserted that no candidate
even in the Socialist movement, has
more thoroughly and conscientiously
prepared himself for congressional
work than Meyer London. Those who
elected him may rest assured that he
will leave nothing undone to work in
the most effective manner for their
special Interests as wage workers of
the Great East Side and the interests
of the working class in general.
SOCIALIST VOTE IN THE CITY
OF EVERETT
Jones, Rep., 2,182; Black, Dem.,
2,672; Barth, Soc, 1,467; Hanson, Pro.,
1,840. ZZZ:
The rest of the Socialist ticket went
as follows: Boomer, 1,410; dinger,
1,989; McCullough, 1,656; Cort, 1,612;
Crosby, 1,436; Husby, 1,630; Bartlett,
1,632; Leister, 1,385; Solie, 1,794;
Thompson, 1,596; Larson, 1,602; Kel
ler, 1,570; Morrison, 1,420.
Hans I. Solie topped the list on the
Socialist ticket in Snohomish county
with 4,148 votes.
Adam H. Barth was the lowest on
the list with 3,403 votes.
R. J. dinger polled the highest vote
in the city, 1,989. . Z
H. F. Leister polled the lowest vote
in the city, 1,386.
TRAFTON
Socialists elected a justice of the
peace and constable and gave a
plurality of from 8 to 26 for their can
didates. Here are the figure? for con-,
gressman: Rep., 10; Dem., 11; Boom
er, 44; Campbell, 15. For eight hours,
56; against, 28.
KITSAP COUNTY
;
The result of the election in Kitsap
county in comparison with 1912 shows
that a clearer vote was cast this year
than then:
Congressman 1912.
Giles, 1534.
Wagenknecht, 1452.
Congressman, 1914, Glenn Hoover,
1101.
Representative, 1912, H. O. Meaford,
1634. Z
Representative, 1914, W. E. Wester
man, 1186.
The moving of the Belgian capital
to France may suggest a way out for
the Mexicans. They could run the
republic with comparative safety from
El Paso. —St. Louis Globe Democrat.
WORKERS OF THE WORLD UNITE! YOU HAVE "OTHINQ TO LOSE BUT
MILWAUKEE ELECTS
NINE TO LEGISLATURE;
WIN IN COUNTY
ELECT 8 ASSEMBLYMEN. SENA
TOR. DISTRICT ATTORNEY AND
SHERIFF; LOSE FOR CONGRESS.
MILWAUKEE, Nov. 4.—Wisconsin
haa elected eight Socialist assembly
men and one Socialist state senator.
This is a gain of two assemblymen
over last year.
Winfred C. Zaiel, Socialist, Is elect-,
ed district attorney, and Edmund T.
Melms, Socialist. Is elected sheriff.
Martin Tlenn, Socialist, for county
clerk, may win when all returns are in.
Wintield H. Oaylord, for, congress,
lost his district by the narrow margin
of 800 votes. Victor i.. Berger lost
by the smaller margalo of 200. The
fight against the two Socialist con
gressional candidates was unusually
j bitter.
The fact that the Socialists have
gained back the two most Important
county offices over a desperate opposi
tion gives the party the greatest cause
for evidence of the solid growth of
the movement in Milwaukee county.
The district attorney-elect held the
office during the term that expired
two years ago. He was elected when
the Socialists first captured the coun
ty four years ago. His fine record
I gave his opponents no chance to cam
paign against him on any other Issue
than Socialism, j??'■';■■'.'■■
Edmund T. Melms, the sheriff-elect,
has been county organizer for years,
and Is responsible, as much as any
individual, for the splendid organiza
tion in Milwaukee.
BERGER SAYS NATION
IS REACTION'S VICTIM
I ■ ,
MILWAUKEE, Nov. s.—Victor 1..
! Berger, former Socialist congressman,
who was defeated for that, office in
the election on Tuesday, made the fol
lowing statement today:
" "There was a wave of reaction and
darkness spreading over the entire
j country.
"Whether the human race is sick
ion account of the world's war —which
is having its effect on the people of
the United States —or whether capi
talism and expansion must run its full
course before it is finally abolished, I
do not know.
"It may be said that the daily press,
j more than any other single agency,
I must be held responsible for the blind
actions of the voters. The daily press
j methodically misrepresents, lies and
blindfolds.
' "In Milwaukee, the Socialists held
their own and no more. W. R. Gay
lord, in whose district there was a
three-cornered fight, came near an
election, and was defeated by less
1 than 300 votes.
"I was hit hard by a combination
of the democrats and republicans.
During the last week the democrat
was dropped by the non-partisan
committee and all voters which that
committee could control were trans
ferred to Stafford to defeat me—l
seem to be the particular object of
capitalistic fear.
"(The Social-Democrats of Milwau
kee have elected eight assemblymen
and a state senator, besides electing
the sheriff and the district attorney.
"So much is clear —a great deal of
agitation, education and organization
must be done during the next two
years."
MILWAUKEE
The Socialists of Milwaukee are
going to demand a recount on the
votes cast for congressman and county
clerk. Gaylord, who ran for congress,
! was defeated by less than 300 votes
with one town to hear from. Martin
Phlehn, who ran on the Socialist
ticket for county clerk, was defeated
by some 59 votes.
GOPHER SOCIALISTS SEND
THEIR MAN TO SENATE
DULUTH, Minn., Nov. s.—Richard
Jones, Socialist lawyer, candidate for j
state senate, has a substantial lead
over Thomas Pugh, the oldest member
of that body, and has probably won.
Jones is 27 years old. He was former
■i ly a telegraph operator and was once
famous as the youngest station agent
I on the Great Northern, being appoint
ed at the age of 12.
SOCIALISTS HOLD
SECOND PLACE IN
OKLAHOMA STATE
PARTY ELECTED TWENTY-ONE
MEMBERS TO LEGISLATURE
CANDIDATE FOR GOVERNOR IS
NOSED OUT BY FEW VOTES.
OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla., Nov. 7.—
According 4to the Daily Oklahoman,
which has never permitted 111 • - exist
ence of tho Socialists to be mon
| tioned in Its columns until nfter elec
tion, Socialists of this Btate now claim
between 60,000 anil 65,000 votes and
have elected 21 representatives to the
state legislature In counties Including
Oarvin, Love, Carter, Atoka, JoliAi-
Hton, Marshall, Klowa, Dewey and
Major.
The same paper gives the vote In
Beokham count) for state represen
tative as follows: Joseph, democrat,
956; Fix, republican, 531; McLamore,
Socialist, 1,012.
in Oarvin county the vote for gov
ernor was, Williams, democrat, 1,844;
Fields, republican, 855; Holt, Social
ist, 1,173.
In Johnston county the Socialists
polled 1,050 votes to 1,180 democratic
and 588 republican votes.
in Kiowu county the vote was 1,213
for the Socialist candidate for gov
ernor, and 1,019 and 1,233 for the
democratic and republican candidates
respectively.
The Oklahoman claims that the So
cialists now admit that their can
didate for governor was not elected,
but It is expected that the Socialists
will occupy second place, beating out
the republicans. I
SOCIALISTS OF OKLAHOMA 1
ELECT TWO STATE
SENATORS I
OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla., Nov. 6.—
The Socialists have elected at least
two state senators and one represen
tative, and the Socialist vote Is in-!
creasing as the returns come in.
At present it is a dead heat between
the republican, democratic and So
cialist candidates for governor and an'
official count will be necessary before
the result will be known.
There is still a chance that 'later re
turns will elect one Socialist congress
man. Hundreds of township and
county officials have been elected.
The Daily Oklahoman, that has per
sistently suppressed all mention of the
Socialists during the campaign, says
of the result:
"The Socialists polled a heavy vote
in all southern counties of the state
and in a number of cases ran ahead
of the republican ticket.
"In one or two western counties the:
Socialist candidate for governor, Fred
W. Holt, received more votes than
either Fields or Williams." The two
latter were the republican and demo
cratic candidates.
, -
OUTLOOK ELECTS JUSTICE
OF THE PEACE
Outlook, Wash., Nov. 8, 1914.
Outlook precinct, Darth 42, Stor-i
land 48, Llvin 47. A loss from last'
year of 10 to 16 votes. Still Outlook!
li banner precinct In the county, the!
loss in the county being larger, and
the Hull Moose loss still larger, The'
eight-hour vote at Outlook 66 for and
192 against. Prohibition 210 for and]
63 against. Socialist candidate for
justice, A. IS. Flint, re-elected and
candidate for constable, B. Hafbrook, I
defeated by 3 votes. '
I attribute loss of Socialist vote in
county to lack of campaign, and only
one county candidate, F. A. Llvln, I
for the legislature. The other can
didates nominated failed to file on
account of fee.
WALTER PRICE,
MALDEN PRECINCT NO. 66
Whitman county gave the following
returns: For United States senator,'
Jones, rep. 102; dem. 85; Soc. 24; pro.'
19. A lot of pick and shovel work
will have to be done in this district
I in order to get the farmers wise to the
skin game. '
, |
There must be some mistake about
the report that capital is tight In
Europe. Servla, France, and Belgium
have moved theirs, and Austria is
ready to flit any time.—Vancouver,
Sun.
i
EVERETT. WASHINGTON. Till RBD
COMRADE JAMES MAURE'
ELECTED TO PENN
LEGISLATURE
FIGHTING SOCIALIST T R
UNIONIST WINS AFTER
FIGHT.
HKADINO, Pa., Nov. Jama
Maurer, the worst hated ami (M
representative of the working class
Pennsylvania, luib boon elected as .
member of the legislature) of this
state,
Feared by the Manufacturers' as
sociation and their lackeys both la the
Bonato and bouts, and ' feared and
hated by Hi" agents whom the Indus
trial bosses hire through political of
fice and actual cash pa; mints to try
and keep organized labor In the lead
ing strings of the capitalist class
party.
Four years ago he made ■< most
rnagnlflcent one man fight again tho
political power of the Industrial mas
ters on the floor of the legislature as
the Bole representative of the work
ing class of this great state. Ho was
marked for slaughter by those whom
he had fought so relentlessly and
went, down to defeat la the. next elec
tion. It was a dear victory, however,
for the robber class. At the next
convention of the State Federation of
Labor he was .elected Its president,
replacing an administration whose
sole aim seemed to be to keep or
ganized labor marking time while
those who fattened upon their toll
waxed ever fatter with spoil. The
Federation began to grow in both
numbers and fighting ability. At the
next session of the legislature
Maurer, with an efficient committee,
appeared at Harrlsburg and stayed
there until the session was over.
Never before had the pliant legis
lative tools of capitalism had their
actions subjected to v such pitiless
scrutiny, and many a legislative
snake, fashioned to suck more effi
ciently the very life's blood of the
workers, was not only skotched, but
killed.
Marked for Slaughter.
Orders went out that at all hazards
his re-election as president of the
State Federation must -be prevented
and the agents of the political pirates
who represent the lords of the mills,
mines and railroads of this state were
at Erie in full force to accomplish the
will of their masters. But they reck
oned without an aroused working class
who fought them to a finish in. one
of tha stormiest sessions that organiz
ed labor in this state had ever known,
and Maurer was triumphantly re
elected by the fighting class-conscious
workers of the state. His election as
a legislator representing the great
manufacturing city of Reading gives
new hope to both the political and In
dustrial working-class movement In
Pennsylvania.
Use New Tactics.
The election in Reading marks a
new departure In Socialist tactics. The
workers In Reading determined to use
their organized power to compel the
three capitalistic newspapers to give
them the publicity that the numerical
strength of the party justified them in
demanding. Three years ago they
called a boycott on these papers who
were giving them no space in a cam
paign, and In five days brought these
sheets to time. The trouble was,
however, that after getting the space
the publishers tried the old trick of
twisting and distorting the statements
of candidates. This year, however,
this was provided against, A press
bureau was opened and every day the
press of the city was handed type
written copies of the talks of the So
cialist candidates and speakers from
outside. All the editors of the papers
knew that a copy was kept of all mat
ter handed out and that they would
twist it at the peril of not only a boy
cott on the subscription department
but upon the merchants who adver
-11 ed in the offending papers.
The result was that the Reading
comrades had 42,000 circulars deliv
ered every day in Berks county in
which were intelligently set forth the
issues of the campaign. Organized
power won as it always will,
Of course, all of this would have
amounted to nothing if it had not
been for the individual and group
work of the comrades. Every poll
was manned and a watcher kept on
the job until the vote was counted.
No chances were taken of losing the
Inc.
caui
ern^r to run .
Him ticket, the grow.... di ii,_
vuto is phenomenal, and the Socialists
fire greatly pleased with the returns.
FIRST WOMAN SOCIALIST
WINS IN CALIFORNIA
Comrade Este]le Lawton Lindsay, of
Los Angeles, will represent the Sixty
tlrtl i\ trld in the m-\l California
: lature.
T. \\\ Williams, state secretary,
write:, fniin LOI Angeles:
.Mrs. Llndiey \h the. first Socialist
woman legislator aver elected. She is
•a newspaper writer and former writerj
of the "Cynthia Grey" column in the
Los Angeles Record and other Scripps
papers.
Klngsley was elected two years ago,
and during his term introduced scores j
of bills, among them the eight-hour
bill. Following the introduction of
this bill the eight-hour agitation con
tinued until a universal eight-hour
bill was placed on the ballot in the
election just passed.
The eight-hour bill was the most
bitterly contested measure in the elec
tion. It was defeated 2 to 1, however.
The Socialists, its most militant cham
pions, lacked publicity avenues to
make the right a winning one, butj
they consider the result a credit to
their work, even though the bill did
not become a law.
The Socialist vote, with incomplete
returns at hand, Is certain to be phe-j
nomenal, though the head of the
ticket ran far behind, due to the fact
that Hiram W. Johnson had the trade
union indorsement. Socialists are
elated by the heavy vote.
MONTANA
A gain of 17,000 votes over 1912.
In Silver Bow county two members
were elected to the legislature. In'
Mineral county the Socialists have
elected the state senator. In Missoula
county the Socialist sheriff was
elected.
HAVERHILL, MASS.
('has. H. Morrill, Socialist member
Of tin- Massachusetts state legislature,
has been returned to that body for
the sixth consecutive time.
TEXAS
1
The Socialist party's vote for gov
ernor was more than double the TOt«
of two yean ago, At that time it was
24,496, This year it runs over 50,
--000.
NEW JERSEY.
The mayor, a city councilman, and
tour marshals were elected in Hale
don,
THE SWISS ELECTION
The triennial election for members
of the Swiss national council resulted
in the change of only eight seats. The
standing of the political parties in the
council now is: Radicals, 110; Con
servative Catholics, 39; Socialists, 17;
Liberals, 13; Social Reformers, 7; In
dependents, 2.
The German chancellor is planning
the reshaping of Europe, One thing
lure is that it couldn't be in worse
■hape than it is now. —Philadelphia
North American.
election after the battle of the bal
lots was over. Mietakes were made,
of course, but the Reading Socialist
movement intends to use these mis
takes to shape and fashion the or
ganization into a fighting unit that
will enable it to capture the entire
city government next year.
I ill1 and the Complex count., .
SOCIALISTS IN CHICAGO
1 r^i AGAIN WIN THREE SEATS
CHICAGO, Nov. Three, and pos
f sibly four, Socialists have been elect
- ed to the Illinois legislature. The
i three elected are:
Stedman, Mason and Madsen.
, Seymour Stedman is one of the best
known attorneys in Chicago, and as a
t member of the last legislature, made
i a fine record. Mason and Madsen also
' wre members of the last legislature,
I (he trio giving the capitalist lpgisla
i tors many a puzzle and many a hard
. knot to untie.
. Chicago Socialists are elated over
i j having sent this delegation back to
• Springfield.
I - -
.
• OHIO SOCIALIST IN LEAD
' FOR HIGH COURT JUSTICE
CLEVELAND, 0., Nov. —Accord-
■ ing to returns from 400 precincts, John
■ C. Madden, Socialist candidate for
. chief justice of the supreme court,
■ leads the republican and democratic
1 .candidate by between 3,000 and 4,000
• j votes. ■
The vote, as far as reported was as
follows: "-'•',*■.
Madden, Socialist, 25,223; Nichols,
, democrat, present chief justice, 23,173,
and Taggart, republican, 20,739.
Madden is not a lawyer and has
worked at his trade as blacksmith un
til recently. ■".i,i
WILL ATTEMPT TO RESTORE
PEACE
Following the united demand for
action on the part of the Socialist
members of parliament, President
I Arthur Hoffman today declared that
he will immediately undertake to
reach an agreement with all neutral
powers for joint action and interven
tion in the interest of peace.
VOTING KINGS
Election officers in the Colorado
strike zone refused to let the miners
vote. Bloodshed was narrowly avert
ed in several places. Strikers had to
use force in order to vote.
SNOHOMISH COUNTY VOTE
Snohomish county vote with three
precincts still to be heard from.
The figures for United States sena
tor were as follows: Jones, Rep.,
4,778; Black, Dem., 5,617; Barth, Soc,
3,403; Hanson, Pro., 5,551.
The rest of the Socialist ticket in
the county polled as follows:
Boomer, congress, 2nd dist, 3,524.
Olinger, representative 48th dist.,
2,699.
McCullough, representative 48th
dist., 2,360.
Frank Cort, county clerk, 4,024.
F. G. Crosby, county auditor, 3,749.
Peter Husby, prosecuting attorney,
4,083.
Mrs. Bartlett, county treasurer,
3,999. '/.^
H. F. Leister, county sheriff, 3,556.
Hans J. Solie, assessor, 4,148.
R. W. Thompson, superintendent of
schools, 4,079.
Ole Larson, commissioner first dis
trict, 3,882.
W. S. Keller, commissioner third dis
trict, 3,738.
The following are figures for state
senator for the thirty-ninth district:
Mitchel, Rep., 2,475; Jensen, Soc,
1,778; Burton, Pro., 2,764.
Representative 49th District.
Rep., 2,425; Rep., 2,350.
Coburn, Soc, 1,917; Grimm, Soc,
1,876.
Pro., 2,828; Pro., 2,791.
**■•* BBuiv.. c capitalist class,
thudded merrily.
I The progressive party, being mostly
Theodore Roosevelt, thudded generally
. and almost impartially as to geographi
cal location. It thudded in Texas with
as much eclat as it did in Indiana; in
New York with as much ease and
grace ss in Pennsylvania and Illinois.
The salubrious skid of the progres
sive party was all-inclusive and not at
all particular as to where it performed.
In Wisconsin, home of La Follette
and his ideas, the progressives were
lost in the shuffle, a reactionary re
publican sliding into the governor's
chair with evident composure.
In Massachusetts, the progressives
drooped in fading glory, doing like
wise in Ohio.
The progressive slump was general,
and politicians generally believe the
so-called party beyond resurrection.—
The Call, N. Y.
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
FOR WASHINGTON
If the Socialists of San Juan county
win the case that they are bringing to
court, Washington win have a state
representative elected on the Social
ist ticket. Comrade Harry Towell re
ceived 553 votes by sticker ballot and
V. J. Capron, republican, 573. The
Socialists have good proof of there
being more than 20 Socialist ballots
thrown out because they were stick
ers and the case has been placed in
the hands of lawyers.
THE RED PLACES IN
SNOHOMISH COUNTY
The following precincts gave a ma
jority vote to the Socialist candidates.
The figures are those given to the
congressional candidates in 118 of the
precincts. Three precincts are still
to be heard from:
Gregory.
Rep., 28; Dem., 36; Soc, 37; Pro. 45.
Locksloy.
Rep., 13; Dem., 14; Soc, 20; Pro., 13.
Edmonds No. 2.
Rep., 35; Dem., 24; Soc, 36; Pro., 12.
Edmonds No. 3.
Rep., 28; Dem., 26; Soc, 29; Pro., 11.
Maltby.
Rep., 21; Dem., 12; Soc, 32; Pro.', 19.
Mukilteo.
Rep., 37; Dem., 50; Soc, 94; Pro., 45.
Olney.
Rep., 6; Dem., 5; Soc, 29; Pro., 19.
Silverton.
Rep., 4; Dem., :i: Soc, 9; Pro. 3.
Shoultes.
Rep., 33; Dem., 38; Soc, 49; Pro., 30.
Sunny3ide.
Rep., 25; Dem., 22; Soc, 67; Pro., 20.
Bryant.
Rep., 23; Dem., 12; Soc, 32; Pro., 26.
Centerville.
Rep., 21; Dem., 15; Soc, 27; Pro., 20.
Lake.
Rep., 10; Dem.. 10; Soc, 18; Pro., 6.
Lake Goodwin.
Rep., 2; Dem., 4: Soc, 8; Pro., —.
Marion.
Rep., 9; Dem., 10; Soc, 32; Pro., 32.
Norden.
Rep., 17; Dem., 3; Soc, 26; Pro., 23.
Port Susan.
Rep., 32; Dem., 20; Soc, 40; Pro., 16,
Richmond.
Rep., 13; Dem., 18; Soc, 45; Pro., 12.
Armstrong.
Rep., 75; Dem., 65; Soc, 75; Pro., 59.
Everett No. 9.
Rep., 23; Dem., 28; Soc, 50; Pro., 30.
Everett No. 22.
Rep., 46; Dem., 64; Soc, 66; Pro., 55.
Everett No. 25.
Rep., 29; Dem., 33; Soc, 53; Pro., 28.
Everett No. 33.
Rep., 10; Dem., 41; Soc, 66; Pro., 54.
Everett No. 37.
Rep., 24; Dem., 35; Soc, 60; Pro., 58.

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