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The Washington socialist. (Everett, Wash.) 1914-1915, November 26, 1914, Image 1

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THE WASHINGTON SOCIALIST
Bfl per M>py, |1.00 per year.
"Unemployed" Mass Meeting at 1612 California, Friday Evening November 27 -Be There, Everybody!!!
EVERETT CITIZENS TO AID
UNEMPLOYED
Mass Meeting Will Be Held Fii
day Evening
TO DISCUSS WAYS AND MEANS
City Commissioners to Take Up
Question
At the council meeting Tuesday
morning Commissioner Walter said the
time had come for the commissioners
to take steps to meot the unemployed
problem in this city.
He further stated that hardly a
day passed without from four to tea
applicants OOSSIBg to his office seek-
Isjg employment. This Is in addition
to the innumerable daily applieams
at tho regular municipal free employ
ment bureau.
Kach of the applicants whose des
perate needs drive him to Salter for
special consideration, tells a story
whose main points are identical with
others who make application. First.
that they have been residents of Kv
erett for a long period. Secondly, that
they are now laid off from work for
a period of a month or more, and that
the grocer had refused to extend
further credit. So now it was a ques
tion of either stealing or quietly let
wife and children starve, as they had
left no stone unturned in a search for
employment.
Mr. Salter called his colleague's at
tention to the fact that this was an
international problem, and that muni
cipalities the world over were at
tempting to meet the issue: and inas
much as cities in the war zone of Eu
rope could care for their unemployed,
surely cities in a nation as rich as
ours will not let children starve in
the midst of plenty.
Commissioners Clay and Kelly
agreed with Saiter that a meeting!
should be called in the near future to
consider the problem of the unem
ployed.
The first meeting will be held Fr<
day evening at 1612 Colifornia, and
plans will probably then be laid for a
great mass meeting in the High school
auditorium next week.
"GROSS MATERIALISM"
National Municipal League En
dorses Principle of Economic
Determinism.
At the annual conference of the Na
tional Municipal league, held in Bal
timore last week, it was candidly con
fessed that the only consideration
given any civil problem by American
business men and their underlings is
that which centers on "the main
chance" —$ $ $. Men and women who
entertain high ideals of civic welfare
must be relegated to the rear, declar
ed, in substance the principal speaker
of Friday's session, Mr. A. Leo Weil,
president of the Voters' league of
Pittsburg.
The report of the committee on
political methods declared that poli
tical reform organizations must "come
down to earth" and remove "the sign
of the 'highbrow' and substitute the
'dollar mark,' which alone apparent
ly, is sufficiently potent to be effec
tive."
It was further declared that "too
much stress is laid upon patriotism,
civic pride and the like, and too little
upon what the continuance of poor
government or institution of good
means to the purse and the person of
the individual citizen."
Just so. But when the Socialist
lays this down as a guiding principle
in the philosophy of history he is
charged by this same class of dollar
worshipers with advocating "gross
materialism."
The fact remains, however, that the
Socialist party alone, of all organiza
tions now influential in political af
fairs, is inspired by ideals that appeal
at, once to individual self-interest and
the progress of the race. None but
the ignorant or the prejudiced deny
this. Read up on the subject, Mr. Non
socialist, ami see for yourself.
POOR EXCUSE BETTER THAN
NONE
Because both sides in a controversy
were not explained to members, (
St. Louis judge has restrained tin
trainmen from calling a strike there
WORKERS OF THE WORLD UNITE! YOU HAVE "OTHINO TO LOSE BUT YOUR CHAINS. YOU HAVE A WORLD TO WIN.
COL McCLURE ON THE CURE
FOR CRIME
Sensational Statistics Wrongly In
terpretatcd by Noted
Editor
WHY AND WHEN CRIME
INCREASES
At tribnt inn nearly all the ills to
which society is heir to the .'lection
Of City and state officials by direct
\ote of the people. Col. S S. McClure.
the noted ma.ua/ino editor and owner,
made some ■tattU&l declarations at
the Kverett theatre last Friday eve
Bing. His talk was valuable in that
i if it accomplishes nothing else, it at
least called attention to the fact thai
the cities and states of this spread
eagle country are about the woist
governed in the world.
We have space here to discuss but
one phase of Mr. McClure's argument.
'—that pertaining to the extent, in
crease and cause of crime in the
United States.
After declaring that murder is in
creasing in the United States six
times faster than the growth of popu
lation, the lecturer gave as the cause
of this increasing lawlessness this
Simple explanation: "The safety laws
'are administered by men either ignor
i ant or corrupt."
That the average chief of police,
mine inspector, etc., is both ignorant
land corrupt is a matter of judicial
record. But this is not why crimes of
violence increase, especially the crime
of murder. Nor, as a matter of fact,
jhas homicide increased in this coun
! try anywhere near as much, in pro
portion to population, as the colonel
(asserts.
Murder in this country, Mr. McClure
asserted, increased six times as rap
jidlv as population from 1881 to 1896,
' going from one in 40,000 in 1881 to
one In 6,500 in 1896, the United
States now having ten times the num
ber of murders per million population
of any other civilized country. Wash
ington, the "most criminal capital in
the world," is such, said McClure, be
j cause its policing is done by amateurs
under the political rewards system.
SOME VERBAL JUGGLERY
In the above statement, the reform
; ing colonel neglects to tell us anything
about the murder record since 1896,
i thogh he does not hesitate to use the
present tense concerning the number
of murders "now" committed annual
ly in this country.
If there was one murder in 6,500
of the population in 1896, this means
that there were over 150 homicides in
each one million of the population in
that year, or more than ten thousand
cases of manslaughter or murder.
These figures are approximately cor
rect, but they do not afford a basis
for comparison with other countries
"now."
PANIC CAUSED HIGH MUR
DER RECORD
While it is true that there was an
annual average of ten thousand or
more murders or homicides during the
panic years 1894-1897, in no single
year since 1896 has the ten thousand
mark been reached, though there has
been an increase in our population
from about seventy million in 1896 to
about ninety millions in 1910. The
annual average of homicides during
the decade 1898-1907, according to the
Chicago Tribune's records, which
were the only figures available, to
Col. McClure, was 8,375; and the ratio
fell from an annual average of 109.0
per one million of inhabitants for the
three years 1902-1904, to 106.7 for the
three years 1905-1907.
In 1909 the number of homicides re
| corded was 8,075, which still further
reduces the ratio per 1,000,000 of in
habitants.
If poverty is the cause of crime, as
the Socialists contend, it is important
that we know for a certainty as to
; i whether or not the crime wave rises
and falls with varying economic con
■ (lit ions.
; U. S. HAS NO OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF MURDER
I
N In estimating the value of Editor
\ic'lure's remarks on the increase of
murder in the United States, the fact
T should be borne in mind that, this
i country shares with China and Bwit
s zerland the reproach of having no JU
1. DICIAL. statistics covering the entire
"MERCHANT PRINCE"
FOUND GUILTY OF
ROBBING PEOPLE
Must Serve Ten Months in Jail
FINE OF $1,000 ALSO IMPOSED—
PROSECUTOR ARRAIGNS
HIM SEVERELY
BSNBSBOi N. V.. Nov. L»:i. Sliort
'ly before midnight tonight Henry (i.
Biegel, tin' New YOTi merchant clmrg
<ml with gHUUI larceny, WM [Ott&d
I guilt; of a misdemeanor. Tho case
wi'iit to the jury at 7:30 tonight
"If liegel had tii'i'ii an honorable
ni;m." Assistant Dlslrict Attorney
Arthur Train said, in otoeing for the.
state, "he would have gone Into bank
ntptoy long ago. But he didn't. In
stead, With his dirtjf enterprises In
mind lu> allowed the "middle class
people' to put. their money Into his
bank that lie might flood It Into his
stores. Wpthln sight dnys of his fail
ure there was no shop girl's penny
too Insignificant ti> lie placed in his
hands."
Siegel was sentenced to ten months'
Imprisonment and $1,000 fine.
There you have the "class Struggle"
again.
Had Siegel been a wage earner, one
of the clerks he mercilessly robbed,
and had stolen 50 cents from the
master's till, or a loaf of bread from
a rich man's pantry, he would have
been "sent across" for 20 years.
country, on which to base studies on
the extent, cause and cure of homicide
or murder. The distinguished gentle
man's figures, which purposely do not
go beyond the year 1896, are based
merely upon the homicide compila
tions of the Chicago Tribune, upon
reports of homicides (not necessarily!
murders) published in (he dally pa
pers. The term murder cannot there-'
fore properly be used in connection
with the statistics quoted by the col
onel for the reason that they include
deaths due to criminal negligonce,
self-defense, etc. Nor do we know
how much of the reputed "increase of
murder" since 1882 was due to better
news service, rather than to greater
lawlessness. As an old-time newspa
per man, Mr. kfoClure must be aware
of this very important factor in such
a discussion.
COMPLETING THE COLONEL'S
STATISTICS
The reason the colonel purposely
omitted the homicide record since his
chosen year of 1896, is because the
panic years of 1895, '96, and '97, were
also the years of maximum number of
crimes of violence in the United
States, the ratio of murders to total
population rapidly declining with the
return of "prosperity" for the bosses
and steady work for the wage slaves.
The number of homicides in each 1,
--000,000 of the population in 1895 and
1896 was 152. By 1907, when men
did not have to rob and murder In
order to live, the number of homi
cides had fallen to 100 in each one
million of the population, Ah Editor
MeClure does not know the annual
average ratio of deaths by homicide
and murder in other "countries of the
world," his assertion that the United
States "has ten times the number Of
murders per million population of any
civilized country" is pure bunk. Such
statistics as are available for pur
poses of comparison afford no basis
for such a conclusion. Much less do
they lead us to infer that our deplor
able record of murders is due to our
policing being "done by amateurs
under the political rewards system."
The crime statistics of Europe and
South America show that the causes
of grave criminality in those coun
tries, as in this, are POVERTY AND
ITS CONCOMITANT EVILS, namely,
want, and opulence, hunger and glut
tory, over-work and idleness, worry
and ennui, ignorance and false cul
ture.
As an upholder of capitalism, as a
Bull Mooser, Colonel McClure must
raise, a sand-storm of petty political
reforms and this can only succeed in
blinding the unthinking populace to
the real problem, THE ABOLITION
OF POVERTY!
AS TO WASHINGTON AND
CRIME
Mr. McClure alleged that Washing
■ ton Is the "most criminal capital in
the world, because its policing Is done
EVERETT. WASHINGTON. THURSDAY, NOVEMBEB 28, 1!)14.
AS THE LAW WORKS WHEN
WAGE SLAVES ARE
THE VICTIMS
Insurgent Miners Are Given Long
Prison Terms.
MAN WHO AIDED IN LOOTING
MINERS' UNION HALL SAFE
CONVICTED OF BURGLARY
BOZBM.AN, Mont., Nov. 23.—
Foley, a Unite mine worker, was
found guilty here today of burglary
in that lie assisted at dynamiting and
looting a safe In the;rioting at Buttel
last -1 11 1 <■. Four hours after the case
was called Foley had been tried, con
victed and sentenced to 20 months in
the state penitentiary, lie win bo
taken to Deer Lodge to join Michael
McDonald and Joseph Badley, two
mine workers sentenced Saturday
night at Bouljler to three and five
yours respectively for kidnaping and
deporting three miners from Butte,
PILCHUCK WENT RED
Hurrah for little old Pilchuck!
Red? You know it. ;
Wljenj the mill boys nnd the farm
ers of Pilchuck precinct went to the
polls November 3, they forgot all
about voting for capitalist-class candi
dates, and when the ballots were ex
tracted from the box they were of a
color that would start a bull-moose,
or any other bull, on the rampage.
Comrade Mike Kronholm sent In
the glad news days. ago, but the com
rades who completed the returns
failed to get them into the list of Red
precincts. Anyhow, the bosses were
not permitted to forget, to count the
Red majority. Bravi' Pilchuck work
ers!
r-
MUKILTEO XISO WON "
■ ■ : ■ * •••■- -'■ -■ -■
Our neighbor, Mukilteo, was Inad
vertently omitted from particular
mention, but the workers there proved
themselves to be thoroughly alive to
their class Interests, and piled up a
good Red majority in the little old
ballot box.
Comrade F. J. Haynes was elected
justice of peace hands down. Good
for you fellows! Let the good work
go on, until precinct by precinct we
win the state, and then the nation.
OKLAHOMA GAINS 11,116
The Oklahoma' Socialists made a
great gain in votes. The vote for
governor was: Dem., 100,773; Rep.,
95,744; Socialist, 52,570; being a gain
of 11,116 for the Socialists over 1912.
The Socialists carried six counties:
Beckman, Dewey, Harper, Major,
Roger Mills, and Klowa.
by amateurs under the political re
wards system." !;,!.'*
This statement Is not only mislead
ing in Inference, but absolutely false
in point of fact.
First of all, Washington can boast
of having for chief of police one of
the most experienced and efficient of
ficers in the United States, Major-
Richard Sylvester. Secondly, we
need only mention the fact that where
as the annual average ratio of homi
cides per 100,000 In Washington, D. C,
is 5.50, in Rome, —"the home
of religion and culture"—the ratio of
homicides is 14 per 100,000 of the
population. We could mention at
least a dozen other capitals of "civi
lized countries" whose crime record
is still greater than Washington's.
(Some of the large Italian cities have
very low homicide records.)
One more point.
If Washington's record Is due to
I "amateur police service," consequent
upon political favoritism (In this case
j it could not be due to popular suff
■ rage, since the Washlngtonlans do
not vote for their administrative of
ficials), how does the colonel account
1 for the fact that the varying crime
records of American cities bear no
relationship to the method of choosing
officials? Cities having the same
form of political government exhibit
a homicide record varying from 1.47
per 100,000 of population as in Mil
i waukee, to 19.69 per 100,000 as in
San Francisco.
MORAL: The capitalist class and
I their apologists will find any excuse
for the evils of present-day society,
but the true cause, Robery of the
workers at the point of production!
ONE MAY BEG FOR JUSTICE
IN WHITE HOUSE BUT
NOT DEMAND IT
President Exercises Regal Powers
GET ON YOUR KNEES OR GET
OUT
In a contribution to The New York
Call, comrade Joseph E. Cohen makes
some timely observation on the Inci
dent .mentioned In this paper last
; week, relative to the president getting
| huffy with Mr. W. M. Trotter, a dele
-1 gate to the White House representing
the' negro rare. Trotter, It will be
recalled, dared to demand his rights,
after a courteous" petition had been"
denied, or evaded.
As oomrade Cohen views the Inci
dent from an angle not treated In The
Washington Socialist last week, wo
(|ii<)te from 1 his article a few para
graphs. '
NEITHER FAWNED UPON NOR
OFFENDED
It. has happened twice now that
some one calling on the president of
the United States, to present a peti
tion for a redress of grievances, has
acted In a way that seemed discour
teous to him.
The first Instance was that of a
committee of. women, when , the
spokesman proceeded to quiz the chief
magistrate of the United States with
regard to his opposition to equal suf
frage. Since ; the president was
dropped into a hole from which he |
could not lift himself by argument, he
abruptly adjourned the meeting..
Similarly In the recent instance,
when a committee of colored people
called to protest against the segrega
tion of their race in the offices of the I
federal departments. Once again, the
president was j| in jj an (uncomfortable
position and he dismissed his callers.
There are cases when a little emo
tion, even passion, serves to empha
size a proposition. In fact, outside
of hypocritical diplomatic circles, I
people are accustomed to.adding color I
to their ideas by robust expression. I
Two circumstances when commit- i
tees might be pardoned for using i
some heat before the president of the" 1
United States are in the presentation! I
of women's rights and the rights of [ I
the negro race. Both are disfran- '
chised, not in merit, but because of '
a practice that shames our nation and
is a disgrace to the president's party
as being, in a great measure, respon
sible for It.
*****
To be sure, the other dominant
party, the republican party, is equally
culpable. It has played the same ,
game as the democratic party. It has ,
never raised its voice to enfranchise
the negro of the South, although it
has been trading for more than half (
a century on its reputation of eman
cipating the chattel slave. Likewise (
has the republican party, when In ,
power, ignored the right of woman
to self-expression and self-rule.
*****
' There remains the most important
point of all. That is whether the .
president, as such, should expect to
be treated other than as the servant!
of the people. This Is-the popular
fiction. The real fact, of course, is!
that the president exercises regal j
powers, even more so than most kings.
His relation to the people, just as in'
the case of hereditary monarchs, is
that of master to man. This should
not be, but it is Innate In our Ameri
can system. Neither need there be the
supposition that the president, being i
the servant of the people, should be ,■
treated with contempt by the citizen
whose servant he is taken to be. That
is highly absurd. But what Is most
true is that the president must ex
pect to deal with human beings, not
dispensers of elegant rhetoric. He
must expect to transact business with
men and women who feel deeply on
the pinch that reaches their hearts—
and he must expect to have them ex
press themselves in the language that
swells up in them. \
It is no crime to look at a presi
dent, and it might be just as reason
able to shout criticism in his ears as '
to shout applause. It unfortunately
happens that those who come to seek
their rights must come as petitioners.
With the old parties in command,
they should realize that they come
to beg, not to demand. They should
bend the knee instead of the fist. To
be tactful, requires it.
WORK OF.SUPPLYING
EVERETT WITH WATER
FIT TO DRINK BEGUN
Kansas City Engineers to Be
Employed
SULTAN BASIN CONSIDERED BY
COMMISSIONERS AS BEST
OBTAINABLE SOURCE
The firm of Burns & McDonnell, of
Kansas City, will supervise the con
struction of Everett's new municipal
water system. The big eastern firm
was the unanimous choice of the
commissioners at the council last
Monday morning. The vote was, hap
pily, unanimous. Though Commis
sioner Kelly had desired to delay mat
ters until he saw there was no use for
further bucking.
The company guaranteed to under
take the work within 10 days after the
contract was awarded. Their repre
sentatives will confer with the com
missioners regarding terms, and after
that is agreed to actual work will
start on the preparation of estimates
and reports on available water sup
plies and appraisal of the present wa
ter system which the city will either
purchase or obtain by condemnation
proceedings in court.
Though the commissioners have not
formally agreed it is Renown that they'
have practically decided on the Sul-l
tan basin system.
FOR THE HOUSEHOLD — A
TIMELY RECEIPE
Now that the winter days have set
in, and the supply of Stone & Web
ster's celebrated health waters is
abundant at a reasonable price per
gallon, the following simple receipe
for preparing these nutritious waters
for table use is sympathetically sub
mitted:
To an ordinary faucet attach the
family flour sieve, turn on the water
and allow it to flow through the wire
netting into a pitcher, and place upon
the table, ready for use. The animal
and vegetable matter left in the flour
sieve may then be placed in an iron
kettle and used as a base for muli
gatawney soup. If no flour sieve is
available, an ordinary gravel sieve
will help some. Try it and be con
vinced.
UTAH SOCIALISTS MAKE
GREAT ELECTION SWEEP
By MORTON ALEXANDER.
MYTON, Utah., Nov. 17.—Socialists
of the new county of Duchere, at the
first election held in this county last
Tuesday, won a tremendous victory
over both old parties by electing two
commissioners, a county attorney and
sheriff and coming within about 100
votes of electing their entire county
ticket, including a representative in
the legislature.
SEGREGATION IN SEATTLE
New Fire House May Be Manned
by Negroes.
WHITE FIREMEN WILL NOT BE
PERMITTED TO WORK
WITH BLACK
Sixty Seattle negroes are prepared
to take the civil service examination
for city firemen, according to I. P.
Norris, transfer man, and one of the
leaders of the people of his race.
"The negroes have no desire to mix
with the white firemen," declared Nor
ris, "but we are American citizens and
taxpayers, and are entitled to repre
sentation in the city's service. Fire
Chief Stetson has assured me he will
do what he can to have the new fire
house manned by a company or ne
groes, and Mayor Gill says he will call
the civil service board to hold ex
aminations of negroes to see if 16 j
men are available to take charge of
the new house, under a white cap
tain."
When the women and the negroes
have their rights, and are equals with
the rest of us in full-fledged citizen
ship, presidents may not be treated
discourteously, since redress for griev-j
ances will be sought at the ballot box.
But then it may also be that the presi-j
dent will have less patronage to dis
tribute and he will neither be fawned
upon nor offended.
CAPITALIST POLITICS IN
EVERETT
Socialist Commissioner's Loyalty
to Workers Meets Rebuke
1
BRIDGE TENDER INCIDENT RE
REALS "CLASS STRUGGLE"
IN A NUT SHELL
The numerous working-class bone
h.mds who vote on the "good man"
theory, instead of along class lines,
have had the Socialist principle of
the "class struggle" illustrated fully
and put into a nut shell by the acts
of comrade J. AT. Salter on the wage
earner's side, and Clay and Kelly on
the employer's, or taxpayer's side of
the struggle.
Every effort made by the Socialist
commissioner of public works to bet
ter the working conditions of labor
in Everett, or to meet the prevailing
union wage scale, has been hampered
by the two taxpayers' commissioners,
Clay and Kelly.
AN EXAMPLE IN POINT
No sooner had comrade Salter
established an eight-hour work day
for the drawbridge tenders, when the
two capitalists' representitives put
their heads together to see how they
could kill the proposition. Result
(in a nut shell): The bridge will
hereafter be worked oa the contract
sy-stem.
The highest^bid is $180 per month,
and the lowest $55.
There were only eighty-two jobless
patriots bidding on the job.
Sure, "any man can. get work who
really wants it."
And there "ain't no classes" in thia
country.
And the working-class like "good
men," and vote against their own rep
resentatives, so why should they not
get what they vote for?
KING COUNTY COMRADES
WILL HOLD COUNTY
FAIR DEC. 7 TO 12
WILL WIPE OUT CAMPAIGN DE
FICIT AND HELP ON SCHOOL
ELECTION EXPENSES
As a means of wiping out a deficit
of $75 incurred during the recent elec
tion campaign, and to cover any school
election debts that may have been in
curred, the comrades of King county
are going to hold a regular old-time
fair, at the Socialist temple, 711 Olive
street, Seattle, beginning Monday eve
ning, December 7, and closing Satur
day evening, December 12.
Cider, big pumpkins, squashes, prize
apples, and all the other time-honored
iktas and muck-a-muck that go to the
making of a real county fair will be
in evidence. Socialists from adjacent
territory or from afar will be welcome
guests during the carnival of farm
products and good fellowship.
The Washington Socialist wishes
the Seattle comrades a good time and
a full treasury as the result of their
enterprise.
SOCIALISTS IN PORTO RICO
ELECT MAYOR
Porto Rico, the little tobacco-grow
ing, sugar-growing, island off Cuba,
has elected two Socialist candidates
to office out of three nominated. Tills
is the first general election the So
cialists have participated in and the
result is a Socialist mayor of the city
of Arecibo, one of the seven largest
cities on the island, and one Socialist
to the house of representatives.
FARMERS RALLY TO CAUSE
Although the Socialists put almost
all their money and energy to work in
the industrial centers, the election re
sults show that the Socialist gains
were mostly made amongst the fann
ers. What would have happened if
the Socialists of the county had con
centrated their propaganda efforts on
the farmers can easily be surmised.
It might be a good policy to change
our tactics and put our energy to work
in the rural districts, and leave Mr.
Wage Worker in the hands of Mr.
Policeman and his club.
GET A MONTH FREE "
i All yearly subscriptions re
ceived during the month of De
} cember will be given the expir
ation number of Jan. Ist, 1916.
Send in your $ $ $ and get one
1 month free.
Xo. 203

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