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The Washington socialist. (Everett, Wash.) 1914-1915, January 14, 1915, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085769/1915-01-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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Page Two
Place Your Money
WHERE
It will be safe, and where it will bring you sure
returns.
You may need it later on.
Four per cent, on Saving Deposits.
Citizens Bank <& Trust Company
Cor. Wetmore and Hewitt
OEM DTI WORKS
The most modern equipped plant in Snoiomlsh county Ladles' or
fenUV tutu cleaned and pressed, 11.00. Why pay more? Expert tailor
tor alterations
MlO WETMORE AYE. PHONE*: Ind. MSX, ». 1. 11»
FRESH CHURNED BUTTER, FRESH RANCH EGGS AND
FULL CREAM CHEESE ALWAYS ON HAND.
Watch for our Wednesday and Saturday specials.
MEADOWMOORE DAIRY STORE, 1916 HEWITT
<MMM«HM » MMMtOMtW
AMERICAN DYE WORKS
S. KOBOISOIf ft BOH a^j^, UCADIHO CLKAJTBtS AMD
Mil Wetmor* fll DT«»S
i Phones «4« f^3Wf#.'
; For high grade Watches ■«• !
: A. J. mohn :
; 1416 HEWITT AYE. |
*«♦••♦♦♦♦♦•♦•♦♦»♦»♦•*♦»»«
f..mmm.m...m......... .. .- )
D. KAMERMAN
Everett'* Reliable Jeweler
1616 Hewitt Avenue
Both Phones: 500
Sam Singer Co.
CENTRAL MARKET
2005 Hewitt
We have consolidated the Public
Market, . formerly on Rucker and
Hewitt, > with our Central Market
and ask all our old patrons of that
market to follow us to our new lo
cation, where we will give you the
same fair and courteous treatment
you always received at the [ old
stand.
MEAT! MEAT! MEAT
-> Honest goods at lowest prices in
Everett. Try us once and you will
always trade with us. No book
keepers to pay. No bad accounts
or other unnecessary expenses.
. Ask central for the Central Mar
ket and you will be sure and get
just what you order. Delivered free.
Phones: S. S. 672, Ind. 82Y
! The • !
: Commercial Press
i
i . ■■■ ■
Printers j
Manufacturers of
RUBBER STAMPS
2931 Lombard Everett
.-...-. ■ ■ ■ .--.---" . - - ■ ■ '
■11 ■■■■!■ ■■■■IT -"" ■*•■■■- ■—
OWL PHARMACY
pi For Pure Brag*
Courteous Treatment — Fret
Delivery
Both Phone* 876
1607 Hewitt Aye.
)■■■■■•■■• ■'■■■» ttTT'*--*-^
,11,11111 L j . | | | ■ ■ I I I 1 T -'1
THE EVERETT DAIRY |
for rich fresh milk, cream or !
butter
Phones: Ind. 708 X, Sunset 616 !
»■«■■»■ ■ ■»■■»■<
■ «■■ ■ »■»■■■■ — ■ ~ T- ■ ■ ■ -■-■■■■
t
Chris Culmback
FOR
TOBACCO
CIGARS
CANDIES
1405 Hewitt Aye.
,; \-\ PHONES 237 i
.twit* i - i-r - --■- - - - -- ----..
Loren Thomas Frank Valller
' PARIS LAUNDRY
Wa gauarantee all our work
and prices are right .
2818 Grand Avenue
Phones 1157 . .
GALLOWAY BROS. S
QUICK REPAIR SHOE SHOP
Half soles sewed on in ten min
utes —All work guaranteed—
Fastest workman in the state.
1914 HEWITT
~ Opp Mitchell Hotel
Phone Ind. 39Z. ;;;
An Economical Place to Trade
MODEL SAMPLE
No More $2.50 No >-«•■
SHOE COMPANY C;
For Men ..,;,7: For Women
The Upstairs Shoe Shop That
Saves You Dollars
How do we do It? Small expenses
Low rent, no clerks to pay
FOBES BUILDING, Room 18
Next Door to Star Theater
1806-1808 Hewitt Avenue
UPSTAIRS
r^———
Closing Out Our Entire Stock
Wall Paper
and
Paints
Great Reductions on Prices
S. D. CLARK
2820 Rockefeller
Pioneer-Alpine Dairy
rresb Milk and Cream Deliver* to All
Parts of the City
Ind. 271 ■ Sunset 1836
26th and Broadway
% When In the North End drop J>
|> In at— ■.•;(. 4>
% PETE'S PLACE f
1 19th AND BROADWAY £
x For Your Cigars, Tobaccos, Soft §
4 Drinks and Candy X
% PETE SHARPLESS, Prop. J;
V^VvVV*-*'V?'Vi'VvVs-^>/»' i • • ■'• • • •
Stevens
Fits the Eyes jj^l
2004 HEWITT AYE. £^<JP?
mmmmmmammmmmmmmmtaaam
I LISTEN. SICK PEOPLE!
it DO YOU REALLY, HONEST-
W LV PREFER TO TAKE
M DRUGS?
X Sickness is a result and so
S is Health
M A. LEE LEWIS
S Registered Chiropractor
9 307-8 COLBY BLDG.
WE Send for My New Book
<s^«..« •••-•■••••«.••■■•■••■••■■•.•••■•■■•--•■■•••••»-...
J. C. SOVDE |
GROCERIES, DRY GOODS AND
NOTIONS
3419 Everett Aye., Cor. Summit
Phoneß: S. S. 1818, Ind 470
<§»«-«-«>.*»*~«~«-.«..*.>«..«»«..*.'«..»-«.>«-*~«»«»«««..»..a.<§j
Bargreen's Golden Drip Coffee, Im
perial Tea Co.
ORGANIZATION NEWS
EVERETT ACTIVITIES
Komi KviTeit No. i vi itn regular
MMton lust Himiliiy night took In four
iii'W members. Tlii'hc, together wllh
tin- «rlit members paying up. Ucpl Ihe
financial itoeretary Ihihv oanoalllni
■tamps.
Promptly m s o'otosli Ohalrman
Davy ■BBOWWd tlnil (he trlnl of 11.
IV Whartenhy wiih tin- next thing on
Ihc docket. Comrade Wlmrtciiby
plead not guilty to (lie Otmgt of party
treason, iiiiiini, out nil the hot air
on I'i'iii nUli'H, tt. amounted to thin:
WMiartenby claimed that, Inasmuch bb
he was under h>ih|ii>iihloh at the time,
ho was out of the party und the local
had no jurisdiction. Tlilh point wiih
thraMhed out and the chair ruled he
wrs Htlll a metiiher (if the local. The
re«t wns t>any, an there wan no queH
tlon about lilh flllnK for the offlco of
BOhool director. When put to a vote
he wan found guilty, 22 to 1, and on
motion to expell him from the local
carried 23 to 0.
The old question of changing the
business miwUngH to some, other (
night of the wfi-K and holding; propa
ganda meetings on Sunday nlghtH,
t|| ;ii;:iin laid on the table until next
meeting. We opine that like Banquo's
(ihoHt that question will not down and
wo might as well thresh It out one tlmo
as another. Come out everybody next
Sunday night and help us settle It.
Dr. E. J. Brown, the. stormy petral
of the Socialist party, was In Everett
Sunday night. \W wonder why?
V. G. CROSBY.
Syitem It to Blame.
"I'm working for my own pocket
all the time." When Hlchnrd Crokor
Toiced this statement n lot of good
people hold up their hands In right
eous indignation. Hut why should
they? This one time chief of Tam
many Hall was simply mOM honest
than a lot of people. Croker whs no
hypocrite, lie worked fur his own
economic interests iiml admitted It.
Wbnt else can the average mini do
under the present damnable system
but work for his own pocket?
It's not men who lire wrong. It's
the system. The system makes men
do wrong wbeh their til nil Instinct
Is to do right. No normal mini gets any
pleasure from seeing other men live in
poverty and want. This Is a world of
plenty. Every Intelligent man knows
that there Is enough pnnlll«fd fur all
to live in comfort, but every Intelligent
man also knows that in miler to live
In comfort under this sysieTn jit rent,
interest and profit he must work for
bis own pocket. What :i lot of ntlier
wise good iiin! Intelligent men do imt
know Is that n better svslhiii is |nmh>l
-hie. n system under whli Ii all may live
In comfort without detracting the least
from the opportunity ul others to live
likewise In comfort. ■
A change from the private ownership
of the means of life to collective own
ership of the menus of life will do It.
Under Socialism a man can work for
bis own Interests without hurting the
interests of others. # He can't do It to
dny under capitalism. As things are
we are all Richard Crokers to a more
or less degree.
- . ■
- .
"TEN MEN FOR NINE JOBS"
There are at all times in Chicago
100,000 men who want employment
but can't find it.
"If Christ came to Chicago" what
I would He do at viewing these figures?
Would He become a member of a
sanctified clubhouse called a church
and snivel about charity?
Would He don a preacher's garb
and become one of
"The things that mount the rostrum
with a skip,
And then skip down again; pronounce
a text;
Cry 'Hem!' and reading what they
never wrote
Just fifteen minutes, huddle up their
work,
And with a well-bred whisper close
the scene?"
Would He fritter His time writing
empty essays on "Drink the Cause of
Poverty" and the like?
Not Hi-. The voice that "spake as
never man spake" would ring will)
the truth about unemployment and
its accompanying evils.
The hand that drove the money
changers out of the temple would lay
the ax at the root of the system that
puts Idle money in the banks and idle
men in the streets. —The Citizen.
THE "BON ORATAH"
It is narrated that Colonel Breckin
ridge, meeting Majah Buffo'd on the
streets of Lexington one day, asked:
"What is the meaning, suh, of the
conco'se befo' the cot' house."
To which the majah replied:
"General Buckneh, suh, Is a bo'n
oratah."
"What do you mean by a bo'n ora
tah?"
"If yo' or I, suh, were asked how
much two and two make, we would re
ply 'foh.' When this is asked a bo'n
oratah he replies: 'When In the cose
of human events it becomes necessary
to take an lntegeh of the second de
nomination and add it, suh, to an in
THE WASHINGTON SOOIAUST
PARTY NEWS IN BRIEF
ll.v II \V. WAITS
I.IIHt Aiii'iihl the Hoi-liillhlh ol' North
DnUoln Ktiirti'd a fund to huy iniln
mohllen nuil put nmnllin In tli"
fli-lil. Today rtlx <:ntintii>H have a ful
ly paid for autoniohlle und an or
i'hiil/it in tin. field eunpftlfnliii
The International peace conferciiro
of Hocliillhlb of neutral natloriH Hched
uled to tukn place In Copeiiliiit'i'M.
liuniary 17, has fallen throiißli. 'I'hlH
Ir due to the fact that the Hoclallßt
uiovemi'iil ; ; made up of olaveß who
are put i mi': flrnt nnd Hocliillhlh when
| their niaHler« don't tieed them.
Coal to the amount of 521,000,000
tonH whs produced In llilh country dur
' ItiK 1114, Could you do with a little
more heat In the hoime?
Tho "Olelchelt," the Socialist, wom
en's paper of (iermnny, has horn mip
preHHcd hecaiiHe of th(> ptihllcution of
,an "Appeal to Hoclallßt Women" to
cniKh tln< war artlo.lo hy dura Zetkin
, In Its coliimiiH
The. Alberta, Ciumfla, K"v«'t iitiient
have decided to devote. $45,000 to the
relief of the unemployed. This, It
thinks, will have it tendency to stop
ar.ilnl ion by Socialists.
District Attorney John D, Fredericks
of I>or Angeles, has admitted that he
paid Ortle McMnnlgal, self-confessed
dynamiter, $1,000 when he was releas
ed from jail in 1913.
Fourteen chapters of the Intercolle
giate Socialist Society have, been or
ganized in American colleges during
tho past year. This makes a total of
60 chapters.
The Social Ist party of Great Brl
taln have been compelled to suspend
all meetings due to the passing of the
defense of the realm (consolidation)
act. The king, by an "order In coun
cil," has made it possible to condemn
anyoneto penal servitude for life who,
by any act, subverts the raind of the
public and stops anyone recruiting or
joining the army.
Two weeks ago Local Everett No.
1, with the assistance of comrade
Heller, started to put on a Saturday
evening show. The local received
half of the net receipts. Owing to the
splendid (?) support given by the So
cialists of Everptt, the shows which
could have bien continued indefinite
ly have been abandoned.
The Protestant British government
of Protestant England have sent a
minister to the Vatican.
Rolls of toilet paper are being sold
in the streets of London, England,
upon each slip of which is a photo of
the kaiser, and the hawker's cry of
"What to do with the kaiser," raises
a grin on the faces of the passersby.
Is this culture?
Between 15,000 and 20,000 women
stenographers and office workers are
declared to be out of work in Cali
fornia.
Wheat is selling at $1.50 a bushel.
Price of bread Is being raised all over
the states and the reformers who
have been satisfied with half a loaf
find that they have to pay as much
for half a loaf as they previously paid
lor a loaf.
Karl Liebknecht in a New Year's
message calls upon the workers of
the world to unite In a war against
war. He declares that the masses
everywhere loathe this war and says
that among Herman workers there is
a much greater degree of opposition
to it than has been generally sup
posed.
There are 31 Socialists in 13 state
legislatures and one Socialist In con
gresß In the United States.
One year ago Pittsburg Socialists
were lecturing to from 40 to 100 peo
ple at their Sunday meetings. To
day, as the result of using "movies"
at their meetings they are lecturing
to from 2,000 to 6,000. At one meet
ing they sold 1,200 pieces of litera
ture and took up a collection of $125.
You haven't sent home that picture
yet. Now's the time to get busy.
Myers Studio can do the work.
Get your Trunk, Suit Case, Bag,
Ladles' Hand Bag, Umbrella or Lunch
Basket at Everett Trunk Factory, 2815
Rockefeller. Green Trading Stamps!
tegeh of the same denomination, the
result, sun—and I have the science of
mathematics to back me in my judg
ment—the result, suh, and I say it
without feah of successful contradic
tion, suh—the result is fo'.' That's a
bo'n oratah."—Lyceumite.
EMPLOYMENT PROBLEM
UNDER SOCIALISM
Fear of Want Will Soon Leave
People's Minds.
THERE WILLBE WORK FOR ALL
Tinl NocliillHt remedy for (Unemploy
incut in to take die employment of the
people from private hands and place It
In their own Idiiklh. to be mnnaged by
their government, made democratic
and subject to their will In every par
ticular.
This can be done only through the
people owning the thing* with which
they work. When they owned the sim
ple tools that once were used and could
get ii portion of land to work when
nil was cheap they could employ
themselves. They can no longer own
the big machinery of production indi
vidually. If they are to control It, bo
ii hie to employ themselves, they must
do It by owning It collectively.
When ii few people own the machin
ery which the many must use they can
keep those people without employment
lit their will.
They become autocrats of Industry.
Thin 1b why you must ask for a job.
They will not employ you unless they
hoc ii pr<)M|HM't of making a profit from
your labor. If they mnke a profit from
you you do not receive the full value
of your product. t>wnershlp of the
loolh becomes the means of exacting R
trlbuts from you. That tribute insures
that you will always remain poor and
llint the owuers of the tools must
grow richer a<td richer.
If the whole people owned the ma
chinery with which things are produc
ed and distributed it follows that they
would all bo able to employ them
eelvea. It would be of necessity the
public policy to ho adjust things as to
give every owner an opportunity to
work. If there should be such a thins:
/ as overproduction then It would result
In leisure or vacations for all. More
over, all would have means whereby
they could afford to take vacations.
There could be no more toll taking.
The workers would receive the . full
equivalent of what they produced in
stead of 11 small portion of it, as now.
Even if It should not be paid to them
the overplus, now called profits, would
come back to them as the owners. This
would tit once end poverty and the
evils that go with It.
The Socialist proposition is that the
people shall organize society and in
dustry to do things for themselves In
stead of trusting that to individuals
who have no interest in it except to
make money from it. Socialists ask
the completion of the work of civiliza
tion that was begun many years ago.
At one time the roads were privately
owned, and there were tollgates at in
tervals. Now they are publicly owned
and tollgates are nt an end. But there
are tollgatea on the railroads and in
the markets, because they are private
ly owned. At oik? time the carrying of
mail was privately done and you paid
whatever owners could get. Now it is
collectively owned, and you get every
thing at cost. The express business
has been ■ private monopoly until the
parcel post came, and you know al
ready how the public institution Is sav
ing the people money. At one time the
schools were private and only such as
had money could pay tuition. When
the public school came it meant that
nearly everybody was enabled to learn
how to rend and write. •
Socialism proposes merely an exten
sion of the principle employed to these
things in order to enable all to live
without being lielil up by private in
terests.
There are those, of course, who will
tell you that Socialism favors free
love. Is against religion and other sim
ilar nonsense. They are merely try
ing to keep you from throwing off the
yoke because they In some way profit
from your exploitation—either that or
they '.(> not understand. Socialism in
tends only to free you, to enable you
to do n-nd think for yourself.
Others very innocently as-k where
we can get the money for doing all
these things. We will get it precise
ly where the present masters of in
dustry get it -from the people who
can work, from ourselves, by turning
our "custom" to ourselves rather than
to tribute takers. Only in doing
things for use rather than profit we
will save the entire tribute of rent,
interest and profit, so that instead of
making the few fabulously rich we
will make nil secure from want, from
dlsemployinent and from war.
Two Million Germans Idle by War.
Geneva.—Since the beginning of the
war 2,000,000 workers have been
thrown out of employment in Ger
many; according to a report from
Munich which has been suppressed by
the police. Almost every manufactur
ing town lies at least partly Idle for
lack of raw materials. There are half
a million women among those who
have lost their jobs.
We Need You All.
We are going to build a new word
We can spare none of you. We must
have all of you— every producer, every
worker with hand and brain.— Robert
Hunter.
It yet may become necessary to land
marines to protect Mr. Carnegie's
peace palace at The Hague.—lndianap
oils Star.
~-_-»-.--. w -^-~>,_ < _^__. m m
I January Clearance Sale I
J Heat Prints, yard 1: c c '
* 10c Lonsdalo and Daisy Muslin, 12 yards for__"_""_7_"."_V_"sioO J?
, 25c Robe Flannel*, yard _ _ 20c '
J $2.00 Bed Spreads, each "_ $149 J
; $1.26 Wide Sheet Blankets __ ~1-"C""IIIIII" 95c J
j $2.50 Kabo Corsets, small sizes only ___ _ 95c" 'S
,i ■'.'>(■ Ladies' Underwear, each __ __ _ ~~~25r 5^
} $7.50 to $10.00 Pall Coats._ "" " $5 00 i
j; $2.50 Silk Petticoats __ " " """"" $190 '
t 10c Outing Flannels, yard 8c '
', 15c Curtain Scrim, yard _____ ~" ~~~~~"~ihnst*>
J 25c Turkish Towels ——I.".""!"""" 19c J
» 12V2C Ginghams, yard _ _ " " in. ;'s
J $2.98 Plaid Wool-Nap Balnkets_____ _" " ""$2 00 'J
{j, 65c Ladies' Union Suits, suit. _ " """" 40-^{t
J $1.00 House Dresses ___! _._ "."* """—"""""75c *i
* Ladies' Suits HATF PPTPW 4 ** X
, $4.00 Tunic Dress Skirts... _ _ ' » 9Q r 5
\ 18c'Galatea Cloth __________ ™""""""—""""— 15c J
J • 15c Dark Flannelette, yard- _ """"""""""in- '2
5 11.26 Bed Spreads, each.. ;_ _ " orMJ!
J 12'/ 2 e Hack Towels _______ """ """""" "?S^j!
• $1.25 Bed Comforters . ""'"" ~~~~ """""""" $100 ;
j $1.50 Ladies' Wool and Lisle Union Suits"Vuit 11111 $100 '
, $1.25 House Dresses ___ _ Qfj- #?
; $12.50 to $18.50 Fall Coats ""_"""" L""""~"VioS^.!
; $1.25 Italian Silk Petticoats.— ..__"""_"_"_" "~~~~~~_ ; 95" \
I DOLSON SMITH |
__»_______ mmm .___l_^^2---__—^^_^.m^^'-^^^^>^'^-mm^mmm^-.m--,-»a. — — ;i
PASTIME
Amusement Parlors
FOR GOOD TIMES
Wetmore and Hewitt
Driesslein & Becker
I DANCING every
I Saturday Evening at
■ Fraternal Hall
■ GOOD MUSIC.
I MEN FIFTY CENTS. W, t LADIES FREE!
HANSEN & VINGEN, MANAGERS
The Wonder Mercantile Co.
Up-to-Date Clothing Store
ESTABLISHED YEARS if
Hewitt and Hoyt '""■::'-.• S. Yeo & Son, Prop*.
' ' ' ""' ''—:.-——_ZlT!tJ
Keep your eyes this way; there are many things in the 2000
Block that may interest you.
PRE-INVENTORY SALE
OF HOUSE FURNISHINGS
All $2.25 Copper Bottom Boilers <* -j t-tr^
Going at ------_._.._____..__.sl.79
$1.25 American Waffle Iron at _ 79C
$1.75 Copper Nickeled Tea Kettle at $1.29
50c Dinner Pails __._ 250
1 SEE OUR WINDOWS
■________B_B_MBW______^ ' ' ' "■
■-----■ ,
Curran Hardware Co.
HEWITT AND BROADWAY
; .„
I BUY I
\ *
\ FLOUR i
I NOW)
' fa Tin vL JP wibS '■
J The indications are that the price will go about $7.00 per bbl. f
; soon. We are now selling- at $1.65 to $1.70 per sack and $6.50 |:
j to $6.70, which is UNDER WHOLESALE PRICES TODAY. '
\ This price is good only for this week. So hurry if you want any I
\ Farm Products Association j
J The store that keeps the crimp in "High Cost of Living" in J>
' Everett '
' *
Thursday, January 14, I .) 15.

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