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The Washington socialist. (Everett, Wash.) 1914-1915, March 25, 1915, Image 3

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Thumlav. March 25. 1915.
Chicagu Ouifitting Co.
EVERETT'S RELIABLE CLOTHING HOUSE
BACHELDER® CORNEIL
Better Clothes
for Men and Boys
<^ .We recommend you to the —. X I
< .We recommend you to the —. *
t HOTEL HOLTON $
! Rooms are nice, large, pleasant .';
\ *>: t and modern. New management. ■•
± * 2928 Wetmore .T
>. Phones: Sunset, 646; Ind.. 953 X 3
.... i-,sivi-...■.;■-;....■..■ . .v. ....;....
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»♦»»«>♦♦
X , HOTEL LOMBARD \
\\ ' 1922 Hewitt Aye. < ',
. ' ■ Rooms 50c, 75c, $1 « '
', ! Phone Ind. 493 X ',',
< • Socialist literature always on < >
';,-;. the table ; |
' ♦•♦•♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ l
»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦< ■
I';' UNION MADE SHOES ];
4» * *
j AT |
{I MUP.RY SHOE CO. < 1
< > o
; ; 1715 Hewitt Sunset 1141 J[
i♦♦♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦
EVERYTHING IN COMMUNITY
SILVER • >-
AUSTIN'S, 2004 Hewitt Aye.
»■«' • ••» •
PETER HUBBY
I Attorney at Law
' Room 216 Stokes Bldg. ..
I 1615V4 Hewitt Are.
. ■«"»
SMATHERS' HOME BOARD
AND ROOM
Smathers' Transfer
Baggage, Express and Furniture
moving to any part of the city.
Rates reasonable.
Phones: Ind. 559Z; S. S. 40
Stand corner Hewitt and Rucker
Res. 2913 Norton Ay«
r-'-- - -y
I Call for Royal Bread at your ♦
{Grocers; also Old Fashion Salt'
} Rising, made at "i
; VIENNA BAKERY j
', B. F. Daniels j
j i
1.......1.. ..n J
{ JOHN F. JERREAD
{ Undertaker and Embalmer
t Phone Main 230
| EVERETT, WASH.
a-..-■.-----.--■-- —^4
• -•-•-•. •"•-•■■• ■.•..»..•-•-•.-•-.•.'•-•"• -•-•■••-•-♦-•"•••;
CITY DRUG STORE
■ 1910 Hewitt Aye.
! | Free delivery to any part of j
i the city. Ask for Green Trading »
j| Stamps.
(■,■■>■■> |i'|ii>it"i'*"»"» » . . . tt-r t .. T - T -.^
fflf v 9u no give your §
W»/ .- "^'W boy and girl an |
J*f £^. opjertunity to I
fi -^ m-'^9 make their home |
\( ,J W study easy ami §
NL _j£Sm ' effective* Give |
v* ~^5T" m them the same |
ijL/v^ j^^ chances to win pro- s
y^t'W*""*^! motion and success §
as the lad having the |
1 NEW INTERNATIONAL (
I Dictionary in bis home. This new =
1 creation answers with final author- |
I ity all kinds of puzzling questions §
1 in history, geography, biography, |
I spelling, pronunciation, sports, arts, |
1 and sciences, F|
I 400 000 Vocabulary Terms. 2700 Pages. §
I Over(.ooolllustrations. Colored Plates. =
I Tin only dictionary with tli< Divided Page. p
I The type matter is equivalent to that |
1 of a 15-voluxne encyclopedia. |
I More Scholarly. Accurate. Convenient, |
s and Authoritative than any other hug- I
1 f. llsh Dictionary. |
REGULAR I
2 AND
t^^^^Hl [ fffaßP'r^*' f-[x' :men paces, h
ssjj2 J ESS r Maps if'you name tlia 3
■W£"!T ' HBr* r paper. I |
{ft^S -iW G. &C. MERRIAM CO., i
UEJ :.£■ BPHIHGFIELO. MAaa. |
**4fcfc>i *^?Hiniiiiiiii(iiiiiiiiiiiiiihiiii;itf!BiiiiiiijiiKiimiii!ittS
to-
Thompson's
Hewitt Aye., Near Maple St.
Something for Everybody
Our Shoes Are Better
. Fisher, the Shoeman
Cor. Hewitt and Wetmore
Fifteen Year* In Everett
»♦♦•♦♦»«»<»«•»»♦♦♦»♦»♦♦<
RILEY- COOLEY
SHOE CO.
1712 Hewitt Aye.
»♦»»»♦♦♦♦««»«»♦»♦♦»«.»♦♦<
».- - -t- t ■ t t i i m t « > c c c » i |i»i a ~,
Always go to C. PETERSON
Oldest and most reliable shoe re
pair shop in the city.
ao»i WETMOM AVX.
Next to People's Theater
Northern Transfer Co.
No hauling too large or small
Storage In connection
Office phone Ind. 292, Bun. 11l
Residence lad. 41T
3000 McDOUGALL AYE.
>♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»»♦»♦»♦♦»»»»<
THE EVERETT BATHS
.. «^^ First Class : ,^J
BARBER SHOP
2821 V 2 Wetmore
>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦-»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦<
C. M. STEELE
Grocery and Confectionery
Stock always fresh. Least pos
sible prices
PACIFIC AND GRAND
EVERETT DRUG CO.
Wines and Liquors for Medical
and Family Use Free Delivery
RUCKER AND HEWITT
Both Phones 61
r
FRANK W. JOHANSEN
1892— Experience— 1915
Diamond Setter, Jewelry Maker
and Repairer, Agate Polisher
1714 Hewitt, Everett, Wash.
' i
M. H. CLAUSEN
For Fresh Roasted Coffee and X
Delicious Tea
'.. Phone 581 2813 Rockefeller ".'.
• • •
; Weiser's Grill
A Good Place To Eat
W. J. WEISER, Prop.
WOLD BROS. & WEST- fl
LUND
I Nineteenth and Broadway I
Dealers in Fancy and I
I Staple Groceries, Dry Goods, I
Unit-"1, Grain, Feed & Dour, j
H Sun. 357 Ind. 318 I
USE
CORONA BLEND COFFEE
And Enjoy Life at—
THE SANITARY MARKET
Hewitt & Rucker. Phone Ind. 878
FREE LEGAL
DEPARTMENT OF THE
WASHINGTON SOCIALIST
Address all questions to At
torney Peter Husby, 2t6 Stok»s
Blrig.. Everett. Wash.
Editor's Note: Free legal advice on
any subject Is given In this column to
Washington Socialist subscribers. Are
not fifty-two copies of this paper and
a legal adviser for a year worth $1.00?
Tell your neighbors about this great
offer.
Q. Being a subscriber of your
esteemed paper I would like a little
advice:
A. gave a mortgage to B. for a stat
ed period of time. Before mortgage
came due, B.« agent told A. that mort
gage could run just so Interest was
promptly paid, so after running a year
past due A. has found it impossible
to keep up taxes and street grade as
sessments. What Is A.'s duty and
what will be the results? Taxes and
assessments are behind for the last
year only. , A READER.
A. If It. Insists upon •Ihiiin be
ing done about the mortgage, then It
is A.'s duty to pay off the mortgage
or have it extended for a definite
length of time. if D. will not extend
the time, then you win have to get ■
loan from some one else to pay off
the mortgage with interest and taxes
and assessments. If neither of these
things are done, then B. will have the
right to foreclose, and sell the prop
erty. After sale, you would have one
year In which to redeem.
LOCAL REPUBLIC ADOPTS
RESOLUTIONS ON MONEY
QUESTION
We, the Socialists of the United
States and all other countries, are
agreed on certain points of doctrine.
We believe in the social ownership
and democratic management of the
means of production and distribution;
we all favor the inauguration of the
co-operative commonwealth in which
there shall be equal opportunity for
all and special privilege for none.
We realize that in order to obtain
this object, it is necessary that all of
those industries that must be operat
ed collectively, now legally held by
corporations and individuals, should
become the property of the govern
ment
As to the proper method of acquir
ing possession, there seems to be a
wide difference of opinion. Some say
I that competition will do the work,
others that the government should
purchase them, and still others claim
that confiscation is the only plan and
to let the government take them with
out remuneration of any kind, from
the parties now In possession and re
store them to the whole people to
whom they should always have be
longed.
We see in the Socialist press a great
deal about the different systems and
ideas; the capitalist system, the wage
1 system, and the profit system; but
j we very seldom, if ever, see anything
I about the monetary system which is
I the mother of them all, the foundation
! on which they will rest.
Let the Socialists when they once
vain control of the legislative branches
of the government, pass a law to de
monetize every dollar in existence and -
substitute therefor a government Is
sue of currency based on labor, to be
paid direct to the people for labor per
former], thin would shift the standard
! of value to where it naturally belong
ed. The price of any article on the
market would depend on the days,
| hours, and minutes Decenary to its
: production.
We believe that the proper solving1
of the money proposition will make
possible the solution of every other
question thai may come up for con
■ideration In the cooperative com
[ monwealth, We believe that this key
' will unlock the door of opportunity
to every individual in the United
States and all other countries if uni
ally applted and that there is posi
tively tin other key that will fit the
lock.
L.i i us therefor kill the old money
I goose that lays all the rotten eggs
that batch nut into the rotten system
thai are a fettering sore on the body
1 politic and thus stop the breed ai nine
i and forever.
Republic, Wash . March 12, 1915.
We, the members of the Socialist
of Republic, Wash., being a unit
in the belief that the proper solution
of the money question is the one es
! sentia] point and that if this idea were
incorporated into the Socialist
I platform, both state and nation, would
cause a revolution in Socialist propa
• work to the lasting benefit of
the Socialist cause.
Therefor, we respectfully submit the
lame for your consideration and hope
that it meets with your approval so
that by publication you may assist us
in teaching this propaganda.
Yours for the co-operative common
i wealth and a eommonsense Socialist
THE WASHINGTON SOCIALIST
NEWS IN BRIEF
ELECTED TO SCHOOL BOARD ;
The Boclalist voters of tlaledon, N.
.1, havn again held thi-lr own against
the combined opposition of all other
parties. Two Socialists were reeled
ed for ii three-year term and another:
1., ml} elected for :i t«rtn of two yean
Tin' linrough of North 11.11.. i. .11 elect-
•(I four school commissioners also '
over the combined parties. !
Professional strikebreakers attack 1
ed strikers from the Summit, N. J., I
silk mills recently. One striker wan J
shot ami another (tabbed. This Is the
third strike within a few months to
take place at this mill.
RUSSIA
The arrest of the five Russian So
cialist incmberß of the Duma lias re
duced the strength of the party to
seven. These members, with the ex
ception of one, I. Munkoff, who has
been asked to resign, voted against
the war budget. The Group of Toll,
ii radical peasant group, refrained
from voting. Russian papers also
bring the sinister news that the Free
Imperial Economic society has been
dissolved by order of the government. •
This society, which counts among its
members the greatest men of science
and art in Russia, has been in exist
ence for 150 years.
AND AMERICA
A young Russian girl or Plttsburg
was asked: "How do you liku our
'country." She replied: "That. Is a
poor question. I have no country anil
I will never have any country that
does not belong to the workers. I
find the struggle for existence in
Pittsburg just as hard as in Russia."
She could have added, and the gov
ernment Just as autocratic.
[' Charles Telller, who Invented cold |
storage, recently starved to death in
Paris. When a caller remarked to
him that "poverty brings out the best
in man," he said, "Yes, brings it out
by the roots."
Because many of them voted the
Socialist ticket 3,000 old soldiers, vet
erans of the Civil war, have been prac
tically disfranchised. ' The authorities
of Los Angeles county have changed
| the polling place of the men in the
Old Soldiers' Home to where they
are compelled to walk 14 miles over
hills in order to vote.
For the first time in Its history,
Richmond college at Richmond, Va.,
has had a Socialist lecture. Harry W.
Laidler, organizer of the Intercolle
giate Socialist society, was the speak
| er, and Jess C. Duke, state secretary
I of the Socialist party, was the chair
man.
Y. P. S. L. NOTES
By WILFORD DOUGHERTY
The Y. P. S. L. of this city will
have its weekly business meeting Fri
day, March 26.
The Everett league must go ahead
and do bigger things than ever. Our
j membership must be Increased. Our
educational work must go on. Our
j social affairs must be bigger and bet-
ter, because leagues are starting up
In other towns and we must be the
banner league.
The Everett league's study class
meets every Monday night, 8 p. m., at
1612 California street. Last Monday
it studied value and price and the
class struggle.
Ellen Moore, Sophus Bonnivie and
| Wilford Dougherty were elected a
(committee to select some subject on
which to debate with the Centralia
league, which has challenged the
league to a debate.
The league has lost an active mem
ber in Harry Tanner, who has been
compelled to go with his parents to
San Francisco. The Frisco league will
have quite an asset in Harry.
A mock trial will be held after the
business meeting of the league Fri
day evening. Bring your friends.
I Everybody invited.
WE MIGHT LEARN
The bill for supplying clothing to
the school children of St. Louis was
defeated by the house by a vote of 58
to 73. The St. Louis conference of
Lutheran pasters decided to fight the
bill on the ground that It was born of
paternalism and Socialism. The bill
was introduced by the St. Louis Cen
tral Trades and Labor union.—Santa
Cruz Free Press.
Dr. Foote's Plain Home Talk, a
i cyclopedia of popular medical and
social service, $2.00 at Hill's Book
Store, 2929 Colby.
platform on which to stand.
Respectfully submitted,
W. A. BOWMAN,
CHAS. E. ANDERSON,
VAI, O. CROCKETT,
Committee.
RULERS IN PANIC
The rising of the workers iv Bng
land has thrown the rulers into some
thing Of a paalC. The London 'limes
rerj guardedly nays: "it would la cur
opinion! be ■■■■ very peal mistake «t
this juncture to usi threatening lan
guage to the men or to tnii< of strong
mi asures. If it becotni s necessary to
take strong measures the less said
about them beforehand the better."
Comrade Qeo. it. Klrkpatrldc has
been invited lo speak before the Cjili
fornla state legislative body on "War."
Twenty cities in the United Stateß
have a Socialist for mayor. Big
municipal campaigns are under way in
several cities and this number is
bound t" be Increased.
Conneaut, 0., shows a falling off in
police court business since the elec
, tlon of a Socialist administration. In
the past month only $28.50 was col
i lected In fines.
In talking of (he recent New York
church bomb scare, ex-Chief of Police
i Devery is reported as saying: "The
. Idea of a widespread plot is nonsense.
.Those boys (the two Italian prisoners)
are not anarchists or Socialists. They
are simply religious maniacs, nothing
more or less. I know their kind. The
" asylums are full of them."
Comrade 7, B. Miller has been re
elected as alderman in the Muscatine,
lowa, city council. The democratic
republican combination resulted in the
' defeat of the other Socialist candi
dates.
A French Socialist serving in Kort
Irving was angered by something that
occurred and gave vent to his feel
ings by shouting: "Ix>ng live the So
cialist republic I Long live the Inter
national!" He was arrested and sent
iik.il to one month's imprisonment
and now many of his comrades are de
manding his release.
The struggle for existence goes
merrily on between the business men
of Everett. The fittest to survive are
! those who advertise in the Washing
ton Socialist. See that you help them
to survive.
If you can spare the dollar renew
your sub. at once and help us over
the hard times that are facing us at
this moment. This time next month
we hope to be in better shape but just
now we need the hard cash. Do it
now.
Take a look at our 10 cent sub. offer
and then rustle up a few subs.
AFTERMATH OF EDMONDS*
SCHOOL ELECTION
Edmonds, Wash., March 20, 1915.
The "compromise" that was effect
ed, as reported by the local capitalist
sheet must have been a pretty slimy
affair when they try to drag the So
cialists down to their own low level
by intimating that there were any
Socialists on the election board at the
school election.
There also seems to be considerable
controversy as to the legality of the
election; but we will leave that to
the public and just state the facts as
they happened: The elector^ present
ignored the hand picked board and
elected V. M. Sill, Oscar Dilner, and
George Bartlett on the board, with
one dissenting vote, that was cast by
lift son, who was iii favor of the hand
picking.
In the meantime a constable arrived
and he was asked if he would uphold
the legal board and see that they got
their seats, and he said "No."
Aa the crowd gathered the question
was asked Mr. Beeton, "Why the le
ual board could not take their seats,"
and lit' replied that they were all So
cialists. After considerable parley he
suggested that each party present
pick a mini iind they be declared elect
ed thus Ignoring the legal board. Mr.
Lang and Mr, Arp agreed to do this,
and Arp picked McßlrOy and Some
picked J. E. Clark and someone sug
gested \r. M. Bill, but before Sill could
decline it was steam rolled through
V If. Sill, who was a Socialist, sait
he could not conscentiously serve be
cause he considered any form othe
than that designated by the school law
il. Then Mr. Beeson induced Mr
McAllister to serve on the election
board. Mr. McAllister was not votec
on by the people present, but appoint
ed or chosen by Mr. Beeson because
be thought him to be a Socialist.
Moral: If you wish to be law abid
ing: Study law. If you want to know
what constitutes a Socialist study So
cialism.
WALTER REECK,
Press Committee.
Rargreen's Golden Drtp Coffee, Im
perial Te» Co.
ENCOURAGEMENT FROM
SOUTH DAKOTA
GREATEST TEACHING FACTOR
Wcssington Springs, S. 1).
March 16, 1915.
Editor The Washington Socialist.
Your books will disclose the fact
that one of the readers of your valu
able . paper lives in South Dakota.
ICvfiry week it brings its quota of
news and.stimulating editorials to one
who has but recently embraced the
doctrines of Socialism, and it is to me
a cheering message.
Primarily it appeals to me because
It is a weekly paper advocating the
principles of a movement that en
circles the globe. But it is more thaft ;
that to me; for until last fall I lived '
In the state of Washington, and so it !
becomes a very personal message to i
an old citizen of the great state of
the Northwest. It appeals to me more i
because I am attending a school here j
which, of course, teaches everything l
but the fundamentals of Socialism.
SOME EXPERIENCES
My fellow 'students know little of
what It means to be class-conscious.
i They cannot understand why "dividing
i iip" should appeal to any man. When j
the error is straightened up,' and the
"dividing up" barrier is proved a fal- !
' lacy, they object on the ground of i
"lack of incentive."
When the "lack of incentive" is
shown to be a present day cause of I
evil they find a supposed flaw else
where..
The greatest factor in convincing \
any man of the evils of the present \
day system, is to be a servant of capi
-1 tal and has the inherent love of lib
| erty in his veins strong enough to
think.
TRUE EDUCATION
This is true in my case; the woods,
j the farm, the saw mill, whose hired !
man I have been again and again, i
; was, as I see it now, the best, the most
practical education that life could give
me; and it educated me, and I have
graduated from the school of capital
ism, and henceforth the education that
I get will be used to help overthrow
. j the institutions of hell.
STOOD BY PARTY
A had an opportunity to enter into
a good work next summer.. The pro
hibition work; but the contract called
; for a^pledge to vote that party ticket,
of course, that settled it; and my
reply was in substance that I was al
: ready a worker in a greater cause than
mere temperance work, and that tem
perance was after all one of the many ■
good things a Socialist government
; would inaugurate.
I wish to thank you for the prompt
ness with which the paper is sent and
wishing you continued success in the
work, I am
Your comrade, ■ '■■ ■ V
E. A. ANDERSON.
t WANT AND AFFECTION
THE LATTER DRIVEN AWAY
WHEN FORMER PREVAILS
By ENRICO FERRI
Want is the strongest poison for
the human body and soul. It is the
fountainhead of all human and anti- '.
social feeling. Where want spreads
out its wings there the sentiments of
love, of affection, of brotherhood, are
impossible. When work is assured,
When living is certain, though poor,
then want, cruel want, is in the dis- j
tance, and every good sentiment can
germinate and develop in the human
heart.
The family then lives in a favorable
environment, the parents agree, the
children are affectionate. And when
the laborer, a bronzed statue of hu-j
inanity, returns from his smoky shop
and meets his white-haired mother,
the embodiment of half a century of
immaculate virtue and heroic sacri
fices, then he can, tired, but assured
of his daily bread, give room to feel-!
ings of affection, and he will cordially
invite his mother to share his frugal
meal.
But let the same man, in the same
environment, be haunted by the
spectre of want and lack of employ
ment, and you will see the moral at
mosphere in his family changing as
from day to night. There is no work,
and the laborer comes home without
any wages. The wife, who does not
know how to feed the children, re
proaches her husband with the suffer
ing of his family. The man. having '
bees turned away from the doors of
; ten offices, feels his dignity as an
honest laborer assailed in the very ■
bosom of his own family, because he
; vainly asked society for honest em-1
| ployment. And the bonds of affec- ]
I tion and union are loosened in that
family. There are too many children, \
I and when the poor old mother ap
proaches her son she reads in his dark
agitated mien the lack of tenderness
and feels in her mother heart that her
boy, poieoned hy the specter of want, |
is perhaps casting evil looks at her
harboring the unfilial thought:
"Better an open grave in the ceme
tery than one mouth more to feed at
home."
Page Thn»*
ZtH: green stamps
"Spring
Styles"
We're Always
Ahead!
You never find this House of
Good Clothes behind in any
thing!
Hut—yon Ml say — "That's
what they all say."
A "see" is the proof!
May jre expect you in?
Bring in tie hoys, too. we
can dross them in style.
BRODECK
FIELD COMPANY
1711-1713 HEWITT
A. A. BRODECK, MGR.
WHO WANTS A FARM?
Here's a Good One—Will Ex
change for City Property.
Ilia, Wash., March 14, 1915.
Kditor Washington Socialist:
Dear Comrade: I have been a So
cialist for twenty years, and will be
seventy next September. For this rea
: son I want to sell my place here and
go to Everett to live among the So
cialists there. I am too old and crip
pled to work, but I could help swell
your vote.
I have 160 acres of homestead land;
80 under plow; 10 in alfalfa, and 20
more good for same. Balance will
: raise wheat, barley, corn, potatoes
melons, vegetables, etc. Plenty of
water for irrigation. Well of fine wa
ter at house; also spring on opposite
end of place. Mild winters; new
school house; warehouse and boat
landing one-fourth mile; depot at Al
mota, three miles; store and black
smith shop, 4 1-4 miles; house 30x14,
\ two stories; school eight months, 20
pupils.
The price is now $6,000. Will take
one or two small houses in Everett,
fat from $1,000 to $1,500, balance part
cash and long-time payments on re
mainder.
For more definite information, write
me at the above address. If I make a
deal through the Washington Social
'■ ist, I will give the paper $100.
I like your paper and your war-cry.
I am a Red.
Yours for the revolution,
J. M. BORFORD,
Ilia, Wash.
DARWIN'S CONTRIBUTION
In supplying us with proofs of man's
kinship with all the other animals of
the earth, and in teaching us the im
portant role of "natural selection," in
the evolutionary process, Darwin has
rendered an incomparable service to
humanity. The great German Social
ist scholar, Karl Kautsky, has well de
clared that Darwin's contributions to
science "belong to the greatest and
most fruitful of the human intellect,
and enable us to develop a new cri
tique of knowledge."
It is absolutely necessary to a
sound understanding of Socialism
that we get the evolutionary point of
view.
In speaking of the value of Charles
Darwin's contribution to the theory of
evolution, Mr. Arthur Balfour recently
said:
"Charles Darwin's great perform
ances have now become part of tin?
common intellectual inheritance of
every man of education, wherever he
lives or whatever his occupation or
trade in life. To him we trace, in the
main, th" view which has affected not
merely our ideas of the living organ
isms, but our ideas upon politics, upon
sociology, ideas which cover the whole
domain of human terrestrial activity.
He is the fount and origin, and he will
stand for all time as the man who has
made this great, and, as I think, be
neficent revolution in the mode in
which educated men can see the his
tory, not merely of their own institu
tions, not only of their own race, but
of everything which has that unex
plained attribute of life, everything
that lives on the surface of the globe
or within the depths of the ocean."
Ten copies of the Washington So
cialist for ten weeks will cost you $1.
Let us send you a bundle so that you
can build up the Socialist movement
In your locality. Get your local inter
ested in this.
A full line of staple groceries and
Scandinavian specialties, new goodf
just arrived, at Eidem's Grocery, 270
Lombard. Phon« 477 X.

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