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The Northwest worker. (Everett, Wash.) 1915-1917, May 11, 1916, Image 2

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Page Two
National Gas
Range Week
May 8 to 13
This week is National Gas Range Week. Every Cas
Range dealer will offer special reductions on gas ranges for
iiiis event.
See the exhibits nowdecide what style range you
want and have the dealer make reservation for you.
The latest and most up-to-date gas ranges are on ex
hibit. It will pay you to look over the displays at one or
more of the dealers named below whether you are now us-
Ing a gas range or not.
The science of cooking has developed rapidly in the
past few years and the dealers have some interesting liter
ature for distribution.
These are the dealers co-operating:
PACIFIC HARDWARE CO., Everett.
EVERETT DEPARTMENT STORE, Everett.
EVERETT GAS CO.. Everett, Snohomish, Monroe.
THEDINGA HARDWARE CO., Monroe.
Pastime Amusement
Parlors
For Good Times
Wetmore and Hewitt Ayes.
DRIESSLEIN & BECKER
DYERS & CLEANERS
Suits Cleaned and Pressed
for $1.00 r^
Guarantee Good Work
NEW YORK TAILOR
• 1114 Vz Hewitt Aye.
H& AMERICAN
*^%^ Dye Works
LEADING CLEANERS
Phones 248
V ! )
f
Union Made Shoes
at
MURRAY SHOE CO.
1715 Hewitt Sunset 1141
w-_ ___ L_ J
OUR SHOES ARE BETTER
FISHER, the Shoeman
Fifteen Years in Everett
Cor. Hewitt and Wetmore
v ; /
JEWELERS
r \
D. Kammerman
Everett's Reliable Jeweler
1616 HEWITT AYE.
Ind. 227 X Sunset 500
V J
Everything in
COMMUNITY SILVER
joJ^^.. -.-— Tgaa
AUSTIN'S, 2004 Hewitt Aye.
f ,
For High-Grade Watches, see
A. J. MOHN
1416 Hewitt Aye.
Call for Volunteers to Circulate Petitions for
Submission to the People at Fall Election of
Beer Manufacturers' and Resident Consum
ers' Act, and for Voters to Sign the Petition.
All persons who are willing to vol
unteer their services to circulate peti
tions for the submission to the people
at the fall election of Initiative Meas
ure No. 24, described as the Beer
Manufacturers' and Resident Con
sumers' Act, will please send in their
name at once to the undersigned.
The new registration law requires
voters in country precincts outside of
incorporated cities and towns, and
voters in cities and towns, to register
in order to be entitled to vote, or to
sign recall, initiative and referendum
petitions.
We.are mailing to each registration
officer in every country precinct, a
few copies of the petition in favor of
Initiative Measure No. 24, and voters
BOOTS AND SHOES
————— ■■ ■—-■'■— >
An Economical Place to Trade
MODEL SAMPLE
SHOE CO.
No More—s2.so— No Less
For Men For Women
The Upstairs Shoe Shop that Saves
[ You Dollars. How do we do it?
Small expenses, low rent, no clerks
to pay.
FOBES BUILDING, ROOM 18
Next Door to Star Theatre
1806-1808 Hewitt Aye. UPSTAIRS
MARKETS
LITTLE BRICK
MEAT MARKET
1809 HEWITT AYE.
Phones— lnd. 677Y Sunset 614
"REJfMMTiT
WEISER'S GRILL
1617 Hewitt Aye.
A Good Place to Eat
H. J. WEISER, Prop.
v. _____
UNION OYSTER AND CHOP
HOUSE
CARL ERICKSON, Prop.
We Cater to the Working Men
1717% Hewitt Avenue
ALL WHITE HELP
_
SHOE REPAIRING"
Loudon's Shoe Shop
2010 Hewitt
(Next Broadway Theatre)
and 1308 Hewitt Aye.
SHOE REPAIRING
Work Guaranteed
LAUNDRIES
i — .
Loren Thomas Frank Vallier
PARIS LAUNDRY
We Guarantee AH Our Work
288 Grand Aye. Phones 1157
in such precincts, when registering
or otherwise, may sign the petition.
Should such registration officers fail
to give the petition to voters to sign,
the voter may send us his name and
address and we will mail a petition to
him for signing.
This call applies to the following
counties:
Kitsap County Douglas County
Okanogan County Snohomish County
Whatcom County Jefferson County
Island County Grant County
King County Skagit County
Chelan County San Juan County
Clallam County
Address all communications to
Seattle Brewing & Malting Co.
Seattle, Washington.
J-' »' JL'-.*-.'-afc l-'-.' A '.J~'.aaV '-'-l' A, I..Ct -»- ' *''"-*- ' J. ' .?„ • J. ' ««. • JL • *. t • t * t • t -• t • I • t .
kiTi »•?•:• 1* trcr. ▼ r:.7i i:.;-i ivi';i.t ivr.t- :+ : + :♦:♦:♦:♦: + :♦■: +'+I +: + :■+.
I ORGANIZATION NEWS I
*JM+H?t ♦k-M+k^+^M- rTW*.4?4:+l *; + i +-i + :-.+-:-*;-.+-i,+mt:-+'l-h+."H*
Stevens County Nominations
NOTICE TO STEVENS
COUNTY SOCIALISTS
Names and addresses of members
nominated by referendum "It," 1916:
State Representative
llodey, Harry, Velvet, Wash,, by
Alladin.
Chase, James, Colvillt, Wash., by
Colville.
Enrlght, Theo., K. 1, Clayton, Wn.,
by Cedoiiiu.
Fobes, Al., Cedonia, Wash., by Mill
ville.
Ruber, ,1. G„ Valley, Wash., by Cl
donia.
Love, Guy, Tiger, Wn., by Alladin.
Tierce, C. 11., Loon Lake, Wash., by
Millville.
White, Archie M., Meyers Kails, by
Colville.
For Sheriff
Brogen, William, Three forks, by
Colville.
DeGrctf, Geo. 11., Colville, bq Allad
in and Millville.
Hunt, C. W., R. 2 Colville, by Ce
donia.
For County Clerk
Hull, Arthur, R. 'J Colville, by Al
ladin.
Lawrence, Mrs. Mary, . Addy, by
Colville.
Nelson, W. E., Orin, by Millville.
Pierce, C. EL, Loon Lake, by Ce
donia.
For Auditor
Chase, James, Colville, by Alladin.
Myers, W. R., Colville R. 2, by Ce
donia and Colville.
White, Archie M., Meyers Falls, by
Millville.
For Attorney
Wilson, John, Loon Lake, by Col
ville.
For Supt. of Schools
Masaer, Miss Rose, Alladin, by Al
ladin.
Wood, Teresa 11,, Orin, by Colville
and Millville.
For Assessor
Nelson, Chas. F. S., Orin, by Col
ville.
Sellig, Peter, Valley, by Cedonia.
Wiltse, R. S., Colville, by Alladin.
For Treasurer
Boarman, Harry, Marcus, by Mill
ville.
McTigue, M. X., Alladin, by Alladin.
Powers, John M., Colville, by Ce
donia.
, For Engineer
(No nominations).
For Coroner
• *. ... . .
Adams, Chas., Northport, by Al
ladin.
Brand, B. W., Colville, by Millville.
Rukgaber, Henry, Chewelah, by
Colville.
Commissioner of First District
Menkee, Alfred 8., Cedonia, by Ce
donia.
Commissioner Second District
Connelly, A. C, Alladin, by Alladin.
De Greif, Geo. H., Colville, by Col
ville.
Hull, Arthur, Colville R. 2, by Mill
ville.
Judge of the Superior Court
Milligan, W. C, Alladin, by Alladin.
I hereby certify that the above is
a true and correct list of all comrades
nominated for county political office.
A copy of this paper will be sent to
everyone nominated, and no other no
tice. Within ten days after the date
LOCAL ROSEDALE
Rosedale, May 8, 1916.
Editor Worker: —
Local Rosedale yesterday passed
& resolution for National Referendum.
It calls for a definite stand against
the doctrine of National Defense, es
poused by so many of the would-be
leading lights of the party. Nation
alism wrecked the movement in Eu
rope; it will do so here, unless the
revolutionary comrades make their
stand against it now. The proposed
referendum will make a clear line up
of revolutionists and reformers, and
show us whether there is sufficient
men in the party to stand by Socialist
principles.
Local Rosedale hopes that Washing
ton locals will back it up by their
seconds, as Washington has had a
reputation for being an advanced
state. But, we shall see.
Trusting you will give this note due
prominence, Comrade Editor, I remain
Yours fraternally,
FRED S. FAULKNER.
Geo. H. Goebel, Everett, May 14.
All the politicians and Daily Howl
ers "appear" to be lambasting the
"big interests" and "monopolies" of
this state and nation. Of course
"There's a reason." Subscriptions
look good and the spoils of office are
better. Big business and monopolies
are the outgrowth of the capitalist
system and anybody that upholds the
present system and then lambasts its
institutions is knocking at the wrong
door. Big business is here to stay,
and Col. Hartley knows that, too. He
also knows that there are plenty of
"suckers" hanging around that can
not analyze the "stage play."
Bargreen's Golden Drip Coffee. Im-
I perial Tea Co., 1407 Hewitt Avenue.
THE NORTHWEST WORKER
of this publication those wishing to
accept must notify the county secre
tary, otherwise you will be considered
as declining. Bee. 10 of the county
constitution requires that candidates
for political office must be qualified
according to the slate constitution.
Sec. 2, Article XVII of the slate ««on
stitution requires that candidates for
political office must have been mem
bers at least two years, provided a
local has existed that long in the poli
tical sub-division lo which the office
is attached.
fours in the Revolution,
JOHN M. POWERS,
County Bec'y.
156 N. Main St., Colville, Wash.
MINUTES OF THE STEVENS
COUNTY HEADQUARTERS
MEETING.
Committee met April 80th, '£ p. m.,
at 110 N. Main St., Colville, Wash.,
all members of the committee were
present. DoGreif was chosen perma
nent chairman, and Powers secretary.
The committee unanimously agreed
that a county headquarters should be
established as soon ns possible, and
thai it be financed by the selling of
shares, and that the value of each
share be 1.00, that individual members
and locals be allowed to purchase
shares, and that no limit be placed on
the number of shares that any indi
vidual or local may purchase, but that
in no case shall any individual or local
holding shares have more than one
vote.
It was further decided that 1,000
shares be issued at the par value of
$1.00 each.
The committee agreed that all lo
cals holding shares shall be repre
sented by their county committeemen
or alternates at all meetings of the
headquarters association, and that in
dividuals be represented in person, no
proxies to be permitted.
That stock certificates be issued as
soon as $50.00 has been subscribed,
and in case $50.00 is not subscribed by
June Ist, 1016, then all money paid in
up to that time shall be returned to
those that have subscribed.
All money is to be paid to John M.
Powers, Colville, and deposited by
him in a bank. As soon as $50.00 has
been subscribed he shall notify the
committee, and it shall meet as soon
thereafter as it can conveniently do
so, and take furthe' -\ction.
The secretary shan cause to be pub
lished in the Northwest Worker a
weekly statement of all moneys re
ceived and from whom.
The committee rented 152 N. Main
St. until May 17 at a cost of $3.00, and
before the expiration of the time for
which the building is rented the com
mittee is to decide whether it shall be
rented for a longer time.
The secretary was instructed to
send a copy of the minutes to the
Northwest Worker for publication
and to each local secretary.
All business transacted was agreed
to unanimously, and the committee
then adjourned «to meet again at the
call of the secretary.
GEO. H. DeGREIF,
CHAS. F. S. NELSON,
JOHN M. POWERS,
Committee.
GO THOU AND
DO LIKEWISE
Trafton, Wash., May Bth, 1916.
Northwest Worker,
Everett, Wash.
Dear Comrades:
1 am sending in some subs so that
you can send the paper to a few
Dubbs. I want to say a few words in
reference to the progress of our Lo
cal. We have taken in four new mem
bers since 'March Ist, and they are
good live ones. We are educating sev
eral more by supplying them with
good literature because we believe in
making good "Class Conscious Social
ists" of them before asking them into
the party.
We held our regular meeting yes
terday, Sunday, May 7th, 11:30 a. m.
After our business meeting we en
joyed a half hour talk by Comrade
Carl Ulonska on "Internationalism
and Its Effect Upon the Labor Move
ment," and then adjourned to the din
ing room to a fine lunch. Fifty per
sons, including children, were present.
We always serve these lunches after
meetings because it helps to get out a
good crowd and that way we get non
socialists to attend the meetings and
they soon get interested in the busi
ness part as well as the social part.
I wish more of the locals would
take up this plan and use the school
houses as we do. They have a right
to use them, and we never accomplish
anything without first trying and
often being defeated several times be
fore we win.
Yours for a bloodless revolution,
CORA DONAHUE,
Rec. Sec. Local Trafton.
Gosh! We'd hate to be known as
a nonpartisan after the 7th of Novem
ber. Well, these things will happen,
even in the best of regulated fam
ilies.
How many sub cards do you want?
"DREAD AND
BROTHERHOOD?
A big audience greeted Comrade
Anna Maley in The Forum, Sunday
afternoon, be hear her lecture on
"Bread no I Brotherhood." Comrade
Malay has mill got the fire of tin'
revolution In her speech, although It
was noticed that she was not a* well,
physically, i*» »he wan when cam
paigning In Ibis slate four years ago.
Her lecture, however, is n hum
tllngei' and just the Kind thai could be
expected from a Comrade who is #is
well Verted In Socialism as the is. In
her speech she said.
"Not only does life depend upon
bread, but most, of the people spend
most of their time in bread-getting.
11l a contolling sense, labor, the bread
getting process, constitutes life.
"Theoretically, the world's desire
for many centuries has been toward
brotherhood. The battlefields of Eu
rope today and the wars of all time
are the acutest manifestations of the
fact that the world's desire has not
been realized.
"Is it too much to say thut we must
look to the workshop, where most of
the people spend most of their lives,
for an explanation of all those things
that defeat the practice of brother
hood ?
"Industry is now carried on by
means of improved tools which make
labor ever more productive. Machines
compete with man for jobs, forcing
men to compete with one another.
Competition among workers means
lower wages—lower wagon means less
power to buy. The less American
workers can buy, the more American
goods must be sold abroad. The same
is true of Germany, of England, of
France.
"The necessity to control trade
routes has been and is behind the con
flict in Europe.
"In short, the motto of industrial
masters everywhere, 'Buy labor on the
cheapest market and sell its products
on the dearest markets,' defeats
brotherhood.
"The United States steel trust has
waged relentless war upon labor un
ions in its effort to buy labor on a
cheap market. It now takes advan
tage of Europe's misfortunes to sell
its products on a dear market. Un
der guise of 'Preparedness' it seeks
to whip the United States into pur
chasing its products. It is not con
tent with making men like Senator
Penrose its salesmen in congressit
must needs put a salesman's grip in
the hands of our President and send
him out to scare the people into buy
ing. All this is not strange in view
of the fact that our government pays
$17.50 each for schrapnel that can be
had for $7.92, and $440.00 a ton for
armor plate that all estimates place
at not more than $247.00 a ton.
"Socialism holds that every city as
a city, should engage in every line of
business that affects the common life
of the city, and that the state and the
nation should do ever so. A city that
can run a school can run a milk depot.
A state that can build roads can oper
ate coal mines. A nation that can
build a Panama Canal can build a
railroad.
"The governments of Europe, to
carry on a war for the profit of the
masters of the bread in Europe, have
gone into many lines of business. If
England as a nation can manufacture
coats for purposes of murder, cannot
a people's government manufacture
coats for purposes of life?
"The point is just here—we must
have a people's government, a govern
ment pledged to put society into busi
ness for itself, to carry on production
for use and not for profit, to give the
people, not free bread, but the free
opportunity to get bread.
"Public schools mean, not free edu
cation, but the free opportunity to get
education. If the child must go to
the factory instead of to the school,
that is not because the people own the
school, it is because they do not own
the factory. It is not because we
have some Socialism, but because we
have not enough Socialism. Private
control of personal use goods, social
control of social use goods—this is
the slogan of Socialism."
Ceo. H. Goebel, Everett, May 14.
TIME TO QUIT
A brakeman on the 'Frisco was
heard to state a few days ago that
Germany had conceded every point to
the United States, and was ready to
publicly apologize or do anything to
atone. When asked where he got that
information, he stated that it came
from Germany just as soon as she
learned that Theodore Roosevelt and
his three sons and one son-in-law, as
stated by Roosevelt, were going to
enlist if war was declared.
Does it require deep insight to un
derstand that with changes in man's
material conditions of life, social re
lations and social system, his ideas,
views and conceptions, in one word,
his consciousness also changes? What
does the history of ideas prove but
that intellectual production changes
with material production? The ruling
ideas of any age have ever been only
the ideas of its ruling class.—Marx.
The workers are slaves from choice,
but their choice Is the result of their
ignorance and their prejudices. If
you can get a slave to read a Socialist
paper or booklet, you have taken the
first step to emancipate him.
TRADE ON ROCKEFELLER AYE. AND SAVE MONEY
LOT OF NEW SAMPLE COATS AND SUITS
FOR SATURDAY SELLING
Twenty New Spring Suits, only one of a kind, in Navy Serge and
Poplin, Green Poplin and Black and White Checks; suits that are worth
$18.50 to $20.00. (Alterations Free). Sale Price $14.00
$1.t.00 SPORT SUITS FOR $10.00
New Corduroy Sport Suits, colors rose and white; nobby belted jackets
with flan skirt, having* two pockets; worth $15. Sale Price, suit $10.00
*IHOO SILK SUITS FOR $12.50
Silk Poplin Suits, colors Navy, Copen and Tan; latest style*, and good
value at 118.00. Sale Price .' $12.50
$30.00 SILK SUITS FOR $20.00
New Taffeta Silk Suits—colors Navy, Black and Dark Green; very
latest styles, and worth $27.50 to $30.00. Choice $20.00
$8.50 SPRING (OATS, $5.00
New Corduroy Coats, belted styles, new black and white check coats;
about 16 in the lot. (all sample coats); worth to $8.50. Sale Price $5.00
$22.50 SERGE COATS, $16.75
Very handsome, medium blue and rose color Serge Coats, all silk lined;
a beauty at $22.50. Sale Price , $16.75
$12.50 POPLIN COATS, $9.50
New ones, black and navy, all wool Poplin Coats; should have been here
before Easter; worth $12.50; but the price now is $9.50
Dolson & Smith
THE STORE AROUND THE CORNER ON ROCKEFELLER AYE.
BEST BUTTER IN THE CITY
Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your Money Returned.
Weight and Quality, Our Motto.
FAMILY ICE (REAM ORDERS OUR SPECIALTY
MEADOWMOOR DAIRY STORE, 1918 Hewitt
ATTORNEYS
Peter Husby
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Room 215 Stokes Bldg.
1616 Vi Hewitt Aye.
SOCIALISM IS
MISREPRESENTED
By ALLAN L. BENSON,
Socialist Party Candidate for
President.
The American press lies daily and
hourly about Socialism. It heaps, upon
Socialism all of its scorn, all of its
derision, all of its contempt. Why?
Because Socialism would harm the
country? . By no.means! Because, in
the opinion of the great)capitalist in
terests, Socialism would cut off the
grafts of the great capitalists. If So
cialism were a fool's dream, the cap
italist interests and their newspapers
would pay no attention to it. They
care nothing about fool's dreams. But
they care a great deal about anything
and everything that has within it the
power to take this country from the
few and turn it over to everybody.
They know only too well that if the
great industries of this country were
collectively owned by the people, and
operated by the representatives of the
people, not for anybody's profit, but
for everybody's use, that the day
the capitalist class would be ended.
By opposing us, lying about us and
slandering us, they really declare
how sure they are that Socialism, if
tried, would do what its advocates de
clare it would do—end poverty.
Workingmen who are being sweated
by the capitalist system to four
rooms and a lean living may doubt
whether Socialism would work. The
capitalists who are sweating the
workingmen have no such doubts.
THE REAL CULPRIT
The Crown Prince had been so busy
that he hadn't had time to get to
gether with his father and have a
confidential chat. But one evening
when there was a lull in the 808-cen
timeter guns, they managed to get a
few moments off. The Crown Prince
turned to his father and said:
"Dad, there is something I have
been wanting to ask you for a long
time. Is Uncle George really respon
sible for this scrap?"
"No, my son."
"Well, did Cousin Nick have any
thing to do with it?"
"Not at all."
"Possibly you did?"
"No, sir."
"Then would you mind telling me
who it was?"
The anointed one was silent for a
moment. Then he turned to his son
and said:
"I'll tell you how it happened.
About two or three years ago there
was a wild man came over here from
the United States, one of those rip
roaring rough riders that you read
about in dime novels, but he cer
tainly did have Aout him a plausible
air. 1 took him out and showed him
our fleet. Then I showed him the
army, and after he had looked them
over he said to me, 'Bill, you could
lick the world.' And I was damn fool
enough to believe him,"—
Be sure and mention the Northwest
Worker, when making your purchases.
Get your Inks and Stationery from
Black & King, of 2816 Colby Aye.
Thutwlny. May 11, 1910. •
DAIRIES
' -.
Pioneer-Alpine Dairy
Fresh Milk and Cream Delivered to
All Parts of the City
Ind. 271 Sunset 1835
26th and Broadway
v J
PAINTS & GLASS
t ; >.
WALL PAPER
and
PAINTS
S. D. CLARKE
2821) Rockefeller
I I ,
GOLDFINCH BROS.'
Wall Papers, Paints, Glass
2812 Rucker Avenue
4 Both" 7 Phones 285
v— 1
TRANSFERS =
( C. V. COLE ■
EXPRESS AND BAGGAGE
Office Phones, Both 314""
Res. Phone Ind. 1080Y
v
EBERT TRANSFER
Let Us Do Your Transfer Work
For Quick Service Phone Us
Stand Phone: Ind. 1268 Z.
House Phone: Ind. 296 X
v — _)
DRUGGISTS
f ~ . 7S
CITY DRUG STORE
1910 HEWITT AYE.
Free Delivery to any part of the
city. Ask for the Green Trading
Stamps.
i
DENTISTS
DENTISTS
DR. ELVERA WESTBERG
DR. VICTOR WESTBERG
Office in Walsh Bldg., over Lowman's
PHONE IND. 1253
BARBERS
CARL REICHELT
Commerce Barber
Commerce Bldg. Everett, Wash.
Two Good Baths
Slj^_ '
GO TO THE
BAYSIDE BARBER
SHOP.
FOR GOOD WORK
1207 Hewitt Union Shop
i . _ '
NOTIONS
' — __
THOMPSON'S
Hewitt Aye., near Maple St. .
SOMETHING FOR EVERYBODY

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