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The Co-operative news. (Everett, Wash.) 1917-1918, December 20, 1917, Image 4

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Co = operative jfleta*
Each For All, And All For Each"
Entered as second class matter March 9, 1911, at the Pom Office nt
Everett, Washington, under the net of March 3, 1879.
PETER imsnv. Editor and Manager
Independent Phone Main 478
Published every Thursday at 1612 California St., Everett, Wuxh.
Subscriptions M cents per year. Twenty-five weeks for 25 cents. Single
copies 5 cents. Bundle orders at 1 cent per copy.
makinc; THE WORLD SAFK for PLUTOCRACY
The slogan of those who are boostiiiK lor the war
is: "Make the World sale tor democracy. He not de
ceived thereby. It is a blind—camouflage. Behind
the mask the legend reads* "Make the world safe for
Plutocracy."
If the war mongers thought that the war would
end in real democracy, industrial as well as political,
they would throw a Henry Dubb fit, and begin to
agitate for peace at any price.
What capitalists mean by "democracy" is: The
right to continue their business of exploitation and op
pression as usual; the right to hire and fire their work
ers without interference from unions; the right to work
men, women and children mp long as they see fit with
out the hindrance of laws; the right to employ children
at as early an age as economic necessity will drive them
into the labor market; the right to battle for foreign
markets with the capitalists of other nations; and the
right to the continued control of politics and legisla
tion in their own interests, regardless of the wants and
wishes of the people.
That has always been their program. They have
not had a change of heart—at least, not so that you
could have noticed it at Everett, Butte, Tulsa, and other
places. If they mean anything else by "democracy"
now, they have failed to express it.
THE CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR.
Although the capitalistic press is crying: Make the
world safe for democracy, they do not have the slightest
intention to do so. Nevertheless, the world will be made
safe for democracy, and to a large extent by the con
scientious objector. It cannot be done by people who
have capitalist exploitation as their ideal.
Those who are to make the world safe for democracy
are now being selected for that purpose by natural se
' lection, which is the way of the Creator. Those who
"fall for" the war hysteria and haven't the brains and
moral courage to withstand it and to escape active ser
vice, will be practically eliminated. While those who
have imbibed more of the higher ideals of international
democracy and brotherly love, and who conscientiously
object to war, will be spared in order that hey may help
to establish a new order of society.
Conscientious objectors should use diplomacy. They
should recognize their historic mission of forming a nu
cleus of the new social order, and should not court the
firing squad.
For their own physical well being, education and de
velopment ,it would be beter for them to accept employ
ment in some non-combatant activity. The aid such
work will give in the war is much less than popularly
supposed.
Producing war supplies and piling them up at Atlantic
ports isn't what helps the war. It is only the delivery
of the same on the other side of the submarine zone
that helps. Railroads, railway yards, docks and sea
ports are conjested with materials even now, that can't
be shipped for lack of carriers. As a matter of fact,
the more raw material that is drawn from the commer
cial veins of the present industrial ogre and put into
war material the sooner will the monster die, or be
weakened sufficiently to be given a coup de grace.
MISINFORMATION ABOUT RUSSIA
LONDON, Dec. 11— Russian officials in London
who are establishing direct communication with Kale
dines and other leaders of democratic peoples in Rus
sia, declared to the Associated Press correspondent
today the movement to overthrow the Bolsheviki was
supported by the Cossacks and leaders of other
parties.
These leaders, it was said, were confident they
would be able to make short shrift of the Bolsheviki.
The first thing to be noted is that the Associated
Press stated that Kaledine is a leader of "democratic
peoples in Russia." It is well known that Kaledine
is one of the aristocracy; and the statement referred to
is readily understood when it is realized that capitalists
really mean "plutocratic" when they say "democratic,"
as we have shown in this issue of the News.
Secondly, it sticks out all over the said "news"
item that the Capitalist papers wish to have the Bol
sheviki overthrown. It is quite evident that they
want to try another Kerensky affair; and they tell you
it is just around the corner. They forget that that
plan was given a good and sufficient try-out, but
ended in a miserable failure because the Russian people
were not behind it. Yet they are hoping against hope
that the old order will be saved. Their sympathy is
with the plutocracy of Russia, who are about to be
thrown from the backs of the people. Verily it comes
hard to be bucked out of a soft seat.
THE ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
"^n. OF LOCAL No. 1
% will give
A Social and Card
I Party
on the liiday evening following Christmas,
(^ AT THE FORUM
1612 California .Street, Everett, Wash.
There \/ill be recitations and music.
Everybody is cordially invited.
Com! and bring- your friends.
A charge/of 10 Cents will be made to
each player.
FANCY WORK.
It may Dt of interest lo he OOBmdM and frienda to
know that Mrs. Mary Willis of I'.IUIK Walnut St. has on
hand quite an amount of fancy-work of various kinds
for the holiday season. She will take orders for any
kind of crochet work or embroidery, ("all on her or
phone Black 1147.
FRISCO LAHOR KAKKK
ENDORSES FICKERT
TO SAVE HIS GRAFT
SAN FRANCISCO Andrew .1.
Gallagher has ordered the members
of the .litney Drivers' Union to put
Kickert signs on their automobiles.
At an executive committee meeting
of the union several days ago, he
demanded that the union go on ice
ord for Fickert.
The reason for tin , rimii' to lirhi
toilny. Gallagher gets $250 a month
from tinl union to deliver police
protection to its members. Fiekert,
in return for < lalhi^lin•'« support,
gives this protection by refusing to
prosecute jitney cases in the police
courts, ami rendering the police pow
erless to curry out the orders of the
United Railroads to drive the jit
neys off the streets. Without this
protection, the jitney drivers doubt
less would have been driven out. long
ago.
'Tuncturv" Threatened
The $250 is not the only stake.
As president of the Golden State In
demnity Compuny, organized to sell
bonds to the jitney men, Gallagher
gets another $250. With Fiekort in
power, Gallagher can continue to de
liver, and collect his $250, and the
other $250 as head of the company.
His salary as president hangs sec
ondarily on his power to get protec
tion, and the whole $500 disappears
like the "sizz" of a punctured tire
if Sweigert is elected.
These facts explain Gallagher's ac
tivities during the last few months.
Friends of Gallagher, who has been
known in the past as a labor man,
were puzzled by his immediate de
fense of Fiekert, when the Oxman
exposure was made. Without in
vestigation of the case of any kind,
he immediately declared that the
bomb defendants were "guilty as
hell," and at issue with every repu
table labor leader in the city, began
a campaign of abuse against every
one back of the Oxman exposure.
From that time on, he has been ac
tively engaged in defending Fickert.
Now comes the explanation. Two
fifty per month is the measure of
his loyalty to Fickert and the gauge
of his belief in the guilt of the bomb
defendants. .
The jitney men have not yet in
dorsed Fickert and it is not believed
they will do so. Without exception,
the drivers are angry at Gallagher,
and it is predicted that resolutions
indorsing Sweigert will be adopted
in a day or two.
DO THEY GET MEN'S PAY?
PHlLADELPHlA.—Announcement
is made that about 4,000 women are
now working for the Pennsylvania
railroad. In five months the num
ber increased from 1,494 to 3,700.
Each day sees more on the company
pay roll. Women are finding places
in all departments of the service.
They are now working in 52 differ
ent capacities, many of them very
responsible, as 500 are telegraph
and telephone operators. In all
such announcements the information
is carefully withheld by the employ
ers as to whether the women are re
ceiving the pay of the men whose
jobs they are filling, but in most
instances the information is~~givt«ft-
that the women are filling the
"places of the men called to the
colors."
REVOLUTIONARY
CHANGES IN RUSSIA
PETROGRAD—The People's Com
missaries continue to carry out their
program, and beginning tomorrow
all officers of the army will be elect
ed by full army suffrage, and all
ranks and titles will be abolished.
Agricultural implements have been
declared a government monopoly and
all machines will be distributed for
the equitable farming of all lands.
The Senate, the highest Russian im
perial court, which was ordered dis
solved by order of the people, have
refused to abdicate and held a secret
meeting yesterday. If the anarchist
refusal to obey the law continues the
government will probably be com
pelled to arrest them. Strikes of the
railroad and government employes
are not yet settled.
NEW FOOD PROGRAM
Families: One wheatless meal daily;
two meat Irs.- meals daily; meatlt'sn
Tuesday; wheatless Wednesday;
porkless Saturday.—From an official
(And we add:) —Sermonless Sun
day; moonless Monday; thankless
Thursday, and freedomlui Friday;
to make the week complete.
SUB HUSTLERS
The following bomradei sent in
Subs to help the Cause along:
Hert Goddard, Plummer, [da 4
Henry Barstad, Cour D'Alene
Ida. z
Hurry Williams, Roteburg, i> : ,
X Meais, Prosier, \V. 1
Sub«crib* for Th» to-.pcr.tivr New*.
THE LMLOF^K/VTIVIi NEWS
AUSTRALIANS AUK
HAVING TIIKIK
TROUHLES ALSO
MKLHOURNK. There are no lim
its to what, the Inw may do if it has
« "net" on you. Last Sunday after
noon, to his own surprise and that of
everybody else, the police arrested
Mr. .1. Swchlenes at the Yarra bank
shortly after he had finished his cuh
toniary propaganda speech from the
Socialist Party's platform. He was
immediately taken to the lock-up,
and it was there ascertained that he
hud to undergo imprisonment for
three weeks owing to non-payment
of fine imposed upon him in con
nection with the production of "The
Glories of War." The fine was £15,
with costs. Secretary- Swehlescs has
not I'l 5, and does not feel disposed
to put. up the money. In_eonnection
with the same pamphlet, the printers
were heavily fined, and this fine
had naturally to be met.
AT THE HEAD OF THE
(LASS
For printing the following bril
liant news item, we respectfully
place the Everett Daily Herald at
the head of the class:
LONDON, Dec. 14.—The real aim
of the bolsheviki is a monarchy at
least, and poHsihly a despotism, in
the opinion of the I'etrograd corre
spondent of the Post. He wires
that for more than a month the bol
sheviki have been openly preparing
public opinion for acceptance of
what, he says, after all, is the only
fit form of government for Rus
sia.
The popular rumor at present, he
adds, is that the Russian heir to the
throne. Grand Duke Alexis, will he
made emperor under the German
aegesis.
DID YOU GET YOURS?
Opporchunity knocks lit ivery
man's dure wanst. On some men's
dures it hammers till it breaks
down th' dure an' thin it goes in an'
wakes him up if he's asleep, an
afterward it wurrks f'r him as a
nightwatehman. On other men's
(lures it knocks and runs away, an'
on th' dures of some men it knocks
an' •whin they come out it hits thim
over th' head with an ax. But ivery
one has an opporchunity. — Mr.
Dooley.
WOMAN SOCIALIST
PLEADS GUILTY
TO SEDITION
UTICA, N. V.—Julia Armbruster,
aged 26, of Syracuse, a member of
the Socialist party, pleaded guilty to
sedition in the United States court
here today, and was fined $300.
For beat meals, waffles and coffee
with cream, go to Everett Coffee
House. 11M Hewitt.
CONTRIBUTIONS TO
WATTS' DEFENSE FUND
Previously acknowledged $72.25
Local Twin Falls, Hazelton, Ida. 10.00
Marvin Sanford, Lovelock, Nev. 2.00
A Friend, Lowell, Wash 2.00
Julius Fowler, Lowell, Wash 50
W. R. Sanford, Freeland, Wash I.oo'
0. B. & Emma Spink, Flint,
Michigan 2.00
John Ulonska, Everett, Wash. 1.00
Ed. Arborni, Everett .50
A Friend 50
S. Heald 50
A Friend 50
A Friend 1.00
A Friend 5.00
A Friend 50
A Shoe Repairer 1.50
Christ Golth 1.00
Adam Hill 50
J. M. Forsell .50
Chas Solie 50
A Friend 25
A Friend 50
Mr. McElroy 50
1. Bagley 1.00
E. Haskins 50
Total $106.00
FOR SALE
BICYCLES—SS.OO down and $5.00
per month. Bicycle tires, lamps,
bells, sundries and repairing. Mo
torcycle, cash register and type
writer repairing. Lock, safe and
ing Goods and Hardware store.
Subscribe for The Co-operative News.
BROADWAY
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Wm. S. Hart in "The Taking of
Luke McVane"
Helen Holmes in "The Raiders"
Ovej and Billie Rhodes
\i>Missiu\ in i . k\i^
FREE LEGAL
ADVICE
Q. The water company of Repub
lic, (n privately owned concern); not
being in a position financially to
gIVC adequate water service has
en lined our citizens to discuss means
of relief.
Some of out comrades have nug
(rested that the citizens incorporate
mid sell to themselves coupons re
deemable in water rent to the
amount sufficient to purchase our
present water system. And that the
pftJltM of the new company shall be
so drawn as to prohibit the sale or
transfer of said water company to
any individual, corporation or firm,
to be operated for profit.
Those opposed to this idea, (and
who desire to acquire the water
system for the sake of profit), claim
the aforesaid proposition, as sug
gested by the socialists, cannot be
consummated because of legal tech
localities. Kindly inform me as to
the facts either by letter or through
the columns of The Co-operative
News. ALHF.FCT STROUT.
A. The plan is perfectly feasible,
if it is worked out properly. It will
hinge upon how the articles of in -
cororation are drawn; and there isn't
very much technicality about that;
just a matter of good faith and
Knowing the objects and how to at
tain them.
COMING TO A HEAD
810 OIL EARNINGS.
NEW YORK, Nov. 28.—Stockhold
ers in the Tidewater Oil company
are not worrying over the high cost
of living as this concern reports a
gross business of $21,011,672 in the
nine months ended September 30,
compared with $17,099,363 in the
full year of 191 C. After deducting
vast amounts for depreciation and
other purposes there remains a bal
ance of $6,935,549, equal to $24.74
for each share of stock.
MAXWELL EARNINGS
REACH $5,507,647
Net earnings of $5,507,647 for the
fiscal year, ending July 31, 1917, are
set forth in a report just made pub
lic by President Walter E. Flanders,
of the Maxwell Motor company. The
net earnings with the undivided sur
plus of $5,310,775 give a total cor
porate surplus of $11,018,417.
PROFITS IN EXPLOSIVES.
NEW YORK.—The Aetna Explo
sives Company, Inc., reports a net
yrofit of $3,725,493 for the 10 months
ending October 31, last.
THE HEAD
At Karkoc, in Russia, the workers
"locked up" the directors of an elec
tric power works until they paid
more wages. Daniel de Leon said
we must "lock out" the capitalist
class. The Russian workers have
gone one better, and locked them up.
Do you realize how near Xmas is.
You should call up Main 118 and
arrange with Myers Studio for a
sitting.
"Theatre Beautiful"
Thursday, Friday and
Saturday
THEDA
BARA
"The Devil Woman"
in
"THE ROSE OF
BLOOD"
SUNDAY
Dustin Farnum
in
"THE SCARLET
PIMPERNEL"
XMAS—
Return Engagement—
"NORTH OF '53"
ADMISSION:
Children, 10c—Adults, 15c
Trade on Rockefeller and Save Money
BIG BARGAINS IN COATS AND SUITS
ALL THIS WEEK
$30.00 Salt's Fur Coats $15.00
Halts Furtex Coats (imitation pony skin), black only, large collar,
lii'lti'd all ground, lined throughout with guaranteed Sol satin;
worth 180(00. We got ■ bargain ho offer them at . . $15.00
$18.00 Cloth Coats $12.50
ladies' New Fall Cloth Coats, gathered backs; belt all around;
colors navy, brown, green; $17.50 and $18.00 Coats, sale price,
at $12.50
$35.00 Plush Coats $20.00
Ladies' Handsome Flush Coats, fur and karamie trimmed; Sol
satin lined, also some plain plushes; worth $30.00 to $35.00;
sale price 520.00
$35.00 Fine Cloth Coats $20.00
Take your choice of all our $30.00 to $30.00 Fine Cloth Coats,
now $20.00
$35.00 New Suits $19.50
New Suits, all silk lined coats just arrived—we bought them for
less; worth $35.00 and $37.50; take your choice at $19.50
"DOLSON & SMITH
WE PAY NO RENT, SO CAN SELL FOR LESS
FOR MEN ONLY
A Full Line of Fall and Winter Clothing, Hats
and Furnishings
EDWARD WAHL
1907 HEWITT AYE.
- Roasters $1.50 to $2.55
CURRAN HARDWARE CO.
N. W. Corner of Broadway and Hewitt
GO TO THE
Continuous r^TkTk f\ [~k CT^^jjjT^ Prices
to 11 p. m. ■ # 1 ■■ m Sm 5 cts. and
Good Shows all the Time
TAKE A LOOK
at our Suit and Overcoat material and you
will immediately place an order with us for a
Union Tailored Made Suit or Ovepcoat.
DUNDEE WOOLEN MILLS
J. G. PESCH, Manager
1716 HEWITT AYE.
FURS
Beautiful Furs for Christmas
Complete her happiness by giving her a set.
I have the finest assortment of all kinds of furs for the
Christmas trade. Open evenings.
S. SKUCY
2414 COLBY AYE.
HALL FOR RENT
BANQUET ROOM AND WELL EQUIPPED KITCHEN
PIANO 225 CHAIRS LOW RATES
For full particulars call Ind. Main 478
or apply at office, rear of building, 1612 California
FREE FREE
A copy pf the Vest Pocket edition of the
report of the INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
COMMISSION will be given to every person
sending in one or two subscriptions, as long as
the supply lasts.
And a copy of THE COLONEL AND HIS
FRIENDS to every person sending in three
or more subscriptions.
The paper cannot now be sustained by the advertising
alone, for several reasons. And unless our loyal Comrades
will go out and get us new subscribers, and also keep up
their own subscriptions, it cannot continue. To stimulate the
work we are offering these premiums. If you have the ones
offered we will furnish you a substitute. Use this blank
and name your selection.
Fifty Cents a Year
THE CO-OPERATIVE NEWS
Kii2 CALIFORNIA STOUT,
Everett. Wash.
Name r><>\ or Street No. city
Selection
Thursday, December 20, 1917

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