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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, December 25, 1905, Image 1

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WEATHER FORECAST: TOMORROW: PROBABLY 3NOW.
BROKEN RAIL CAUSES
TERRIBLE ACCIDENT
Thirteen Seriously Injured
'-Three Will Die From
Results of Injuries I{e*
cieved in Christmas Day
Wreck,
(Scrlpps News Association.)
DUANGO, Colo., Dec. 25.—Twen
ty persons are reported injured,
some fatally in a wreck on the Hio
Grande, near here. Fifty passen
gers are imprisoned In overturned
coaches.
Later reports say 1.1 are injured,
end three will die as result of the
Injuries. They are:
Kate Porter, Silverton, Colo., arm
torn off at elbow.
John Scholleld, Durango, inter
nally Injured.
M. 0, Harris, mail clerk, internal
ly Injured.
Others Injured: Mrs. Stave Rog
WANTED MAN'S MONEY
TAKEN AWAY FROM HIM
A wild eyed w.vman, who refused
to give her name, rushed into the
police station this morning and
aksed for the chief of police.
"I am the chief of police," said
Mr. Waller.
"I am the woman who called up
a short time ago and asked what
time the police station opened in
tsf ■ morning. I was told at 9:30 by
a friend of mine. Is it now open,"
Mked the woman.
"This office has been open for
the last 18 hours, madam," said the
chief.
"Well, I didn't know that, but I
want you to run up town and see
POLICE WILL RID CITY
OF FEW MORE LOAFERS
The police has been busy for tha
past two days and have a long list
of arrests to their credit. Tho
chief has expressed an intention to
clear the town of a few more bums
end loafers l>eforo the holidays aro
over. His men have made a good
start. Among the late arrests are:
Carl Sannwald, last night by Of
ficer Daniels, for carrying conceal
ed weapons.
W. 11. Thompson, a colored bar
tender, last night, for carrying con
cealed weapons. He will be tried
tomorrow In the police court.
John Hogg, last night, by Detoc
tlv ""'Herndon, booked for obtaining
money under false pretenses. Ho
had HO cents on him when searched.
Ollicer Mclsaac tills morning ar
rested James Stanford and John
INLAND CRACKER CO.
ENTERTAINS EMPLOYEES
One of the pleasant gatherings
of tho holiday season at which well
wishes and expressions of appre
ciation are exchanged between em
ployer and employe, was the din
ner given Saturday evening in the
Moorish room of the Spokane by
the Inland Cracker company. Tho
occasion practically marked Hie
close of three years of successful
business for which "tho company
Credits the employes largely for
their painstaking care and loyalty."
Brief speeches were made by Ires
The Spokane Press.
ers, Silverton, badly bruised, collar
bone broken; Baby Rogers, teeth
knocked out, bruised; Herrick
Head, back badly bruised; Perino
Head, cut badly, bruised; Gonzales,
badly bruised; Luciro, badly bruis
ed; Tom Acord, Durango, badly
burned; Smart, shoulder dislocat
ed; Hugh Ferguson, Silverton,
back and head badly injured.
By seizing the red hot stove In
bare hands and carrying It to a dis
tance from the wrecked train,
Acord prevented a conflagration!
and saved many passengers from
death by lire.
The train was derailed as it left
if yoyu can find Mr. Warner. He
was in town Saturday night and
had lots of money on him. His wife
is staying at my house and I can't
keep her any longer. Y'o just go
and find Warner and take his mon
ey away and give it to me and 1
will give it to his wife."
"Madam, I can't take the man's
money away. It belongs to him.
He earned it, and can do what ho
wishes with it."
"Well, If that isn't just like these
police," stated the woman as she
started for the Salvation Army to
see if she could find a homo for
Mrs. Warner and her baby.
Miller and booked them on the
charge of stealing some clothing
from a grip belonging to C. F. Fa
ger, who lives at the Great North
ern hotel.
Stanford secured a bed at the ho
tel last night and was put in the
same room with Fager. This morn
ing Fuger was standing out in
front of the hotel when he saw
Stanford come out with a bundle.
Stanford picked Miller up and
started for the pawn shop on Wash
ington street. The two were try
ing to sell a shirt of Pager's when
arrested.
Warning. Don't transcat any
business with J. I. Morgan until ho
gtes back that 16,000,000,
ident B. R. Ostrander, Secretary
f, W. Riesling, Superintendent J.
E. Davis, Head Baker (5. W. Bank,
Traveling Representative Tony
McDonald and C. L. Bolton, and
Secretary Ben H. Rico of the 150,-
--000 club. Musical numbers were
rendered by Mrs. McEaehren,
Miss Cummlngs aud Miss Florence
McF/achren. Miss Ellen Kiosling
gave a musical recitation and John
Shaw was heard In humorous
recitation. About 70 employes and
guests were present.
• the bridge. As the last coaches
left the bridge, the whole train was
overturned and plowed on its side
for 300 feet. Kate rorter was sit
ting across the aisle from Scho
flekl and was thrown across the
train and her hand plunged through
the opposite window as the coach
toppled to the ground, she was
caught In a trap and the arm torn
off by friction.
The train was bound for Denver
and was making up lost time. The
accident was due to a broken rail.
socim m
UPUd AT
CAPITOL
MRS. ROOSEVELT WILL NOT
ASK MRS. FAIRBANKS TO
RECEIVE WITH HER.
WASHINGTON, D. C, Dec. 25 —
Washington society receiver a
great surprise when it learned that
a new regime had been inaugurated
in regard to the receiving line at
the official levees at the White
House.
Mrs. Fairbanks, wife of the vice
president, has not been asked to
stand beside Mrs. Roosevelt at the
New Year reception, nor will she
b expected to appear as other than
a guest at any of the other levees
during the season. The close as
sociation of Mrs. McKtnley and
Mrs. Hobart had led society, j ex
pect that Mrs. Fairbanks would
share all the social honors.
Mrs. Fairbanks will make no ex
pression on this new ruling; but
the Impression ls she believes that
a feeling exists against her social
prominence at present, especially
among the cabinet women.
Cabinet Women Protest.
The cabinet wives say she has
no more right in the social coun
cils or honors with Mrs. Roosevelt
than the vice president has in tho
president's graver affairs. She has
not been asked to tako part in tho
boudoir conference which Mm>.
Hoosevelt holds every Tuesday
with the cabinet women.
Mrs. Fairbanks ls popular, and
since she began her Wednesdays at
home this season she has hundreds
of callers. She never approved of
the cabinet women's policy about
not serving refreshments, aud she
spreads a gorgeous collation and
has an orchestra in attendance at
all her at-homes.
Two Courts of Homage.
It Is understood that in conse
quence of this ruling the vice pres
ident and Mrs. Fairbanks will hold
their own official levees at their
home on Fnrragut square, and so
ciety will have two courts at which
to pay homage.
It will lie watched with luterost
where the Fairbanks will be placed
if they appear at the White House
to pay their respects to the chief
executive.
PRIZE FICHTER
IS IN CUSTODY
James Ford, who gives his occu
palton as a prize fighter, was ar
rested last night by Detective Mac-
Donald for larceny from the per
son. He Is accused of taking some
money from the pocket of an Intoxi
cated man In tho Wilber saloon. Ho
is also wanted in Wallace for ruu
nlng away with a man's wife. Ford
admits he has been living on free
lunches for the past two weeks.
Most men are too vain t' own up
tht they're vain.
SPOKANE, WASHINGTON, MONDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1905.
HENRIK IBSEN IS BYING
Henrik Ibsen, the amous Norwe
gian dramatist., is dying, according
to tho cable news dispatches. He
was born March 20, 1828, at Skein,
W. A. Aldrich of the gas company Is talking again. In one
breath he is promising the people "dollar gas." He is paying
for this statement. It is an ad. In the next breath Mr. Aid
rich says gas cannot be manufactured in Spokane for a dollar
and he is really going to expose a few gaseous secrets in all
their nakedness and tell the city council and the people why.
Mr. Aldrich makes the last statement in a published interview.
It cost him nothing.
Now, in which statement is Aldrich telling the truth? or
are both false?.
When Mr. Aldrich makes two such statements in the same
issue of the same paper, the public may be excused for doubt
ing his word at all times.
But the most amusing thing about all this wild talk of Mr.
Aldrich Is that he has become so kind hearted that he can
not bear to see his prospective competitor waste his hard
earned shekels in trying to sell gas for a dollar in Spokane.
And he is actually going to ask the city to appoint them
selves the other fellow's guardian and prevent him from ruin
ing himself.
Now, insn't that just like thst good man, Aldrich? and it
was Christmas morn when he was delivered of this noble
sentiment.
Don't worry about the other fellow, Mr. Aldrich. His mon
ey is his own and the people wl'i see that he has a right to do
what he pleases with it, especially If he intends leaving $200,-
--000 of it In Spokane.
The olty council is not a protfste court and is not In the
business of protecting the financially foolish, If such these men
be, who wish to give the people of Spokane 20 candle power
gas for a dollar a thousand.
Now, what is really wrong with Mr. Aldrich is that his
concern can not give the people "dollar gas" and pay divi
dend* on $1.0ju,000 worth of watered stock and bonds.
Norway. His first winning produc
tion, "The Warrior's Mound," was
staged In 1850, and in the 55 years
since that he has scored a long pro
cession of successes.
Under the Mistletoe.
T. R.: "NOW GET BUSY."
TWO ROIioERIES
WERE REPORTED
Two minor robberies occurred
last night and were reported to the
police.
While Father Decanter was at
midnight mass, some one entered
his home, corner Walnut and Dean,
and secured about $1 in nickels and
pennies.
When Father Decanter left his
home early in the evening for his
church services he locked the front
door and left everything secure.
When he returned he found tha*
the front glass had been broken out
and the door unlocked. Nothing
with the exception of tho church
money was missing.
Attorney E. C. Robertson, who
lives on Riverside and Oak, report
ed to the police that some one en
tered his office In the Hyde block
Saturday night and secured his
black overcoat. Mr. Robertson re
quests that the thief return the coat
as It is the only one he has.
LONGWORTH IS
GUEST OF HONOR
AT WHITE HOUSE
(Scrlpps News Association.)
WASHINGTON, D. C, Dec. 25 —
Christmas was observed at the
White House with customary good
cheer. In the morning the younger
children gamboled around a little
tree which they had rigged up
themselves. Later in the day they
went to the home of Capt. W. S.
Cowles, the president's brother In
law. The president sidetracked
business absolutely for the day,
spending most of the time with his
family. This evening there will be
an informal home dinner at which
Nicholas Longworth, prospective
son in law of the president, will be
tho guest of honor.
JUDGE TULEY
REPORTED DYING
(Scripts News Association.)
CHICAGO, Dec. 25.—Judge Tu
ley, Nestor of the Chicago bar, is
dying at Kenosha sanitarium, ac
cording to the 8:30 bulletin issued
this morning.
FOURTH YEAR. NO. 39. PRICE: ONE CENT
CUV 1$ DESERTED
m CHRISTMAS MORN
Not in years have the streets in
the business district of Spokane
been so deserted of people on
Christmas morn as in the hours of
tills forenoon. Yesterday, being
Sunday, much of the holiday greet
ings about town were exchanged,
while today was reserved for home
greetings and family gatherings. In
reality there are two Christmas
days in Spokane this year, which
accounts for the practical desertion
of the public, thoroughfares this
morning.
People in touch with the situa
tion say that many men of sporting
inclinations took advantage of the
slight snowfall to take gun and dog
MUNICIPAL RAILWAY
IS A SURE WINNER
WEST SEATTLE, Dec. 25. —
Councilman Davis stated today that
the report of the city clerk at the
end of the year will show that the
city has made in the neighoorhood
of $350 in the management of the
West Seattle municipal railway, In
stead of a loss of $1500, as has
been the expectation of ihe city.
This report will materially help the
Seattle municipal league in boom
ing municipal ownership of electric
railways in Seattle.
The 2% cent fare gave the line a
PRINCE OF PILSEN
ENJOYED BY A
CAPACITY HOUSE
"The Prince of Pilsen" was en
joyed last night at the Spokane
by a capacity house. The musical
comedy is fully up to expectations
and its presentation is uniformly
meritorious. The choruse is well
selected and introduces some very
attractive and novel marches. Tho
individual parts, are well taken.
Jess Dandy as Hans Wagner from
"Ziuzinnati" is amusing from start
to finish and gives his role an indi
viduality which never grows mon
otonous. Ruth Peebles and Marie
Walsh In leading roles were favor
ites with the audience. Both ladies
are possessed of fine voices and are
well tutored In their parts. Louise
Willis as tho widow mad a hit In
the "American Girl" song and chor
us. The stein song and "Heidel
burg" led by Carl Otto, met with
repaeted encores and was perhaps
the most thoroughly enjoyed of the
19 musical numbers.
The company appears again to
night.
ACCUSED OF
BEING DESERTER
John O. Johnson was arrested
Inst night by Officer Smith and
booked for desertion from the U.
S. army. He was taken to the res
ervation this morning by the army
police. Johnson left the fort about
five days ago and has been on a
prolonged spree ever since.
TO THE ASYLUM
Louis Chinaman was taken to
the county jail this morning whore
he will await commitment to the
asylum at Medical Lake.
TRAINLOAD OF ORIENTAL
MERCHANDISE IN ROND
One of the largest shipments of
oriental merchandise ever carried
through Spokane, went east over
the Great Northern this morning,
for some time tho attention of pe
destrians along Bridge street and
the Post street bridge was attract
ed by the long train of cars, com
pletely covering the Great North
ern viaduct, each of which bore a
red card, indicating that the goods
to the fields and woods for rabbit.
Occasional pairs might be seen on
the streets as late as 10 o'clock.
The Medical Lake cars early in tho
day were filled with gunners and
canvas-backed fellows who were an
ticipating sport in the grain fields
and wooded clumps along the lino
of that road.
"Hotel lobbies were unusually
quiet this morning and there seem
ed to be less than the usual amount
of travel. Generally speaking tho
various drinking places of the city
lacked patronage In the early hours
of tho day, though the traditional
punch bowl and its cheering drink
were in evidence on the bars.
fine patronage from the start and
West Seattle citizens think they
have solved the street car problem.
At the last special meeting of the
city council Attorney Blchard Saxg
Jones was appointed to represent
the city in the Amos Brown case.
The bonds Issued for the erec
tion of the new municipal light
plant are all contracted for, the
Kilbourne-Clarke company taking
practically all of them. Kilbourno
& Clarke also has the contract foe
tne installing of the same.
LIQUOR LEADS
TO BREAKING UP
OF TAYLOR HOME
Too frequently imbibing from the
flowing bowl last night caused the
arrest of Fred Taylor of 302 Boone
avenue. Last night and this morn
ing calls came to the police station
from neighbors and from Mrs. Tay
lor that Taylor was breaking up
the furniture and might do bodily
harm to herself and daughter.
Mrs. Taylor called upon Judge
Hinkle and secured a warrant for
Taylor's arrest. This morning Of*
flc erCasey took him into custody.
Casey stated the house looked as
though a regiment of soldiers had
encamped in it.
CHURCH AFIRE
CHRISTMAS MORN
(Scrlpps N>ws Association.)
CHICAGO, Dec. 25.—A falling
candle at St. Finbar's church at 5
o'clock mass destroyed the decora
tions of the altars and caused great
lisorder among the 60 worshippers
who tore down the draperies. The
fire was smothered before the fire
department arrived. No one was
injured.
FATAL STABBING
OVER A GIRL
ELY.- Minn.. Dec. 26. — At a
Christmas eve celebration in %
blindplg three Austrlans were stab
bed and will probably die. The
fight started over a girl serving
beer. A dozen men drew knives
aud began slashiug each other's
throats.
were in bond for delivery to the
United States customs division.
Little is known here as to the
contents of the cars, but, inasmuch
as a large cargo or teas and silks
from Chinese ports has within the
past week arrived at the Puget
Sound wharfs, it ls supposed that
the traiuload is of that cargo.
Twenty-three cars composed the
train, which is running on special
schedule express tlmo to Chicago*

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