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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, July 14, 1906, Image 4

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1906-07-14/ed-1/seq-4/

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BIGGEST ONE-FARM WHEAT
CROP IN WHOLE WEST
. THE MILLER BOYS OF 101
RANCH IN OKLAHOMA NOW
HARVESTING 175.000 BUSH
ELS—SIX-FOOT SWATHS A
MILE LONG BY THE MOWER
—HOW THE BIG JOB IS DONE.
By F. W. Schaefer.
(Special to The Press.)
BLISS, Oklahoma. July 14. This
year's wheat crop in Oklahoma
now is being threshed, and is prom
ising a record breaker. Figures as
to the yield in the whole territory
of course are lacking at this time,
but 101 ranch will do Its share to
swell the total with a crop estimat
ed at 175,000 bushels.
Sounds big, doesn't it? Well, it's
a big ranch. There are 700,000
acres of It, and 9000 acres devoted
to wheat. This 101 ranch is where
they do things on a large scale.
Now as to that wheat crop. Joe
Miller says—and you believe him
If he does go about in his shirt
sleeves and wears an ancient hat
with sweat stains clear out to the
brim —that beginning some three
weeks ago, they had 46 harvesters
hacking off the bearded grain
(poetical name for it). It took
three horses to drag each of these
harvesters, which were of the type
cutting a six-foot swath. Some of
these swaths were easily a mile
long. If you want to become sta
tistical, figure out how many bush
els to the mile, reckoning :'u bush
els to the acre.
And again Joe Miller will tell
you, with the other Miller boys to
back him up. that each of the ma
chines cost from |2000 to $3000.
Also it is an undisputed and indis
putable fact that it takes 46 driv
ers to drive 46 harvesters. Then
there are 23 water haulers, twine
haulers, etc., to say nothing of a
few superintendents and a gang of
men at the stables to feed and
harness the DUlee and horses.
If you are used to some small or
garden variety of farm, it will
mean something to you when you
hear from Joe Miller—no relation
to the joker of that name—that he
now has out six thrashing outfits,
besides the thrashing machines.
Each outfit needs 10 bundle wagons
10 grain wagons, one cook wagon
and one water wagou. It calls for
a total of 60 drivers of bundle wa
gons, six engineers, six separator
men. six water wagon drivers, six
coal haulers, six cooks, six assis
tant cooks, Co grain wagon drivers
and 36 pitchers (grain, not base
ball). Each of these machines
thrash from 900 to 2000 bushels
of grain daily.
Going'
Camping
Then go to Fish Trap lake.
Get off at Tyler, 27 miles south
west on the N. P. R. R. The
best bass and perch fUhing in
the west. An ideal camping
place free to all.
Boats, tents, fishing tackle
and camp supplies of all kinds
on ground. Also stable and
feed for horses.
Pay us a visit.
Address R. D. WILLIAMS,
Tyler Wash.
Incldently Joe Miller, who is the
oldest of the Miller boys, owners
of 101 ranch, takes off his hat to
the Inventor of the blower and
stacker. He says it is one of the
greatest labor savins' discoveries
ever made. An employer of 400
men can appreciate that. By the
way, there is never any dearth of
harvest hands at 101 ranch. Appli
cants always Apply there first.
On the Miller ranch the harvest
ers eat and sleep in the field, as
they are from one to 10 miles away
from the house. A cook wagon,
very much like the owl lunch wa-
A COOK WAOON.
gons you see down town in cities,
stays by them out in the field.
There is a little counter in it and
stools for the men. while the rear
is taken up with the cook stove and
a refrigerator. The men go to bed
by the simple process of lying
down on the ground, pillowing
their heads upon a shock of wheat
! and pulling a wagon over them
for comfort. The mules do not eat
iv the field. They are fed at the
ranch stables, where 4uf) or 500 of
them are allowed to fill up on corn
i and oats all night long. This is
[their only meal In the 24 hours,
but it Is one that lasts.
The 101 ranch wheat crop, al
though mammoth, Is not its only
one. The big tract of land, leased
from the Ponca Indians, also pro
duces 150,000 bushels of corn a
year, 5000 tons of prairie hay, 3000
tons of alfalfa hay, and it supports
15.000 cattle and 3000 hogs.
Joe Miller, 38 years old, conducts
general supervision over the farm
and signs the checks—and he can
sign pretty big ones if he does do
Every person should know that
good health is Impossible if the kid
neys are deranged. Foley's Kidney
Cure will cure kidney and bladde.-
disease in every form, and will
build up and strengthen these or
gans so they will perform their
functions properly. No danger of
Briglit's disease or diabetes if
Foley's Kidney Cure is taken In
time. Watson Drug Co.
SPOKANE STAMP WORKS
STAMPS, CHECKS, SEALS, STENCILS, HOUSE NUMBERS.
ENAMELED SIGNS, NUMBERING MACHINES, CHECK PROTECTORS, ETC.
LET US FIGURE WITH YOU ON YOUR NEXT ORDER FOR PRINTING.
TREE THRASHER OUTFITS AT WORK IN ONE FIELD, 101 RANCH.
WILL INTEREST MANY.
We Have Moved
Opposite Hotel Spokane
in with a lead pencil. He also com
munes with the Indian landlords
in the Ponca tongue.
Next is Zach, who looks out for
the 15,000 cattle and the cowboys,
and who does most of the travel
ing.
George is the office man and
keeps in constant communication
with all parts of the ranch and the
United States by local and long
distance telephone.
They have 2000 acres in cotton
MAY LOSE WIFE HE WON
AFTER LONG CHASE
CLEVELAND, 0., July 14—A
romance begun at Cornell three
years ago and a furiously carried
on in various parts of Canada and
the United States was shattered
when Jessie Palmer Kitchen, sev
eral days ago. decided to file a suit
for divorce against Karl K. Kitch
en, son of Dr. H. W. Kijtchen, of
this city.
Cruelty will be alleged.
Kitchen, who Is wealthy, was a
freshman at Cornell when Jessie
to 518 First Aye.
at 101 ranch this year. Thehy have
more than that in watermelons.
The cotton in an experiment.
Says Joe Miller: "If it turns out
all right, we'll plant some."
ERECT STORE
John McCullough was given a
permit this afternoon to erect a
two story brick store on the cor
ner of Virginia avenue and Monroe
street tat a cost of $12,000.
Palmer came there as a member of
a Floradora company. The young
| student was infatuated. He fol
lowed the pretty chorus girl to
! Canada and all over the eastern
' states for months In his impetuous
! wooing. A hurried marriage fol
lowed.
The couple came to. Cleveland
and made their home here until
two weeks ago, when they separat
ed. The wife has gone to New
York.
mum
mmm
OYSTER BAY, July 14—It Is an
nounced here today that no sug
gestion as to the method of media
tion to insure permanent peace in
Central America will he made by
this country unless the overtures
come from either Guatemala or
Salvador.
The president is ready to co
operate with Mexico on any feasi
ble plan. In extending the offer
of mediation he suggests no pro
gram.
EMPHATIC
IS HIS "NO"
NEW YORK, July 14.—Before
sailing today for London to attend
the Interparliamentary peace con
ference, John Sharp Williams said
lie believed Roosevelt intended to
be a candidate in 1908 and that he
lias been playing so thaht the nom
ination will be forced upon him.
OYSTER BAY, July 14.—When
■thown Williams' statement, Private
Secretary Loeb said:
"The president meant what he
-laid. He wouldn't run again. His
decision is irrevocable."
WHOLE FLOCK OF FEE
GETTERS
Following the return from the su
preme court of the remittitur in the
case of Amelia Starr versus the
Mutual Life Insurance company of
New York, for enforcement of in
surance policy on the life of the
plaintiff's husband, who was killed
near Hatton a couple of years ago,
the county clerk was ordered this
morning to allow, withdrawal of
original exhibits from the files. A
feature of the order is the number
of attorneys of record. These are:
Hartson & Holloway, Bedford
Brown and ,1. I). Campbell for the
plaintiff and Hughes, McMicken,
Dovell & Ramsey of Seattle for the
defendant.
ICE WAGON AUTOCRATS
WON'T LOOK AT 'EM
Uneasiness pervades Peaceful
Valley these thirsty days of sum
mer. Folks down there are getting
madder and madder as the mer
cury climbs higher. The object
of their wrath is the ice man. For
some reason that warm weather
product has cut out the serenity
and simoleons of Peaceful Valley.
Figuratively — almost literally
speaking—the population over
there is on its knees to the ice
man, but the ice man heeds them
not. He hits his nag a whack and
passes proudly by.
Peaceful Valley wants to he
shown whether or not its money is
not good enough for the ice man.
It wants to know if one of the
species exists who deliberately
passes up profit and In a general
way Peaceful Valley wants to know
where It Is at on the cool
question.
BRYAN'S TOUR
IN AN AUTO
LONDON, July 14.—During Will
iam Jennings Bryan's tour of
Scotland he will be the guest of
William McKillop, member of the
Irish party of parliament, and the
guest will travel in an automobile.
SPOKANE GETS THE
BAPTIST CONVENTION
OMAHA, July 14.—The efforts of
Spokane, through Rev. Dr. O. W.
Vans Osdel, have been successful
and" next year's national gathering
of the Baptist Young People's
Union will be held in Spokane.
ARE FIGHTING FOR LIBERTY.
LOS ANGELES, July 14 —Judge
Ross of the federal court today
granted' habeas corpus to the Los
Angeles bankers and busi»»»Rß men
indicted in the Oregon land fraud
cases, returnable July 25, and they
were released on bail. They are
to carry the fight against extradi
tion to Oregon into the supreme
court.
John W. Peters, postmaster at
Rathdrum, Idaho, is In the city
today on some legal business.
MS. WINSLOW'S
SOOTHINQ SYRUP
aaabaM used by Million! of Kothrra for theW
cbildrau wblle Teething for over Fifty Yiors.
It cotbr* tb« child, .-oftoiin tbe sum*, &H«r*
•II pain, enrol wind colio. ami Is tbe bast
temedy for dtarrboML .
HOW AMERICANS LIVE
ON PANAMA CANAL
..If You are a Tenderfoot They
Talk Undertaker and Casket
maker—All men from the States
Are Homesick and Only the Big
Pay is attractive —A De Lesseps
Engineer Says We'll Never Fin
ish the Canal.
By Victor M. Hughes.
(Special to The Press.)
PANAMA. Isthmus of Panama.
July 14. —Louis Van de Putte, who
was DeLesseps' chief engineer, and
under whose direction was made
most of the canal building progress
of the French, has come back to
the isthmus to view again the work
he deserted a score af years ago,
fleeing before a scourge of malar
ial fever, which, he says, brought
death to every member of his Im
mediate party of G5 except himself
and one other.
Monsieur Van de Putte is a
Parisian. After a week on the
isthmus he w... go to Columbia to
look into the practicability of a
new railroad system.
Van de Putte shook his head sad
ly, as he stood at the foot of Cule
bra hill, mid tne hum of the toiling
thousands, with theeir steam shov
els, drills and locomotives.
"I shall never see the Panama
canal," said he. "No, not If I live
to be—what do you cal lit —a cen
tenarian. For at the present rate
of operation it will take 50 years
to complete the work, and after
awhile they are not gotng to work
so well as now. Not that there are
any engineering problems. That
is the simplest part of the whole
project. But there's malaria down
In those swamps, and there's yel
low fever in that jungle, and there's
death awaiting eight men out of
every ton who come here. The
Americans, it is true, have done
much to improve conditions, but
they can do no more than promote
cleanliness. But the fevers are in
the soils below, and in the rains
from above."
Needless to say, none of the
Americans on the isthmus share
Van de Putte's pessimistic views.
From Stevens, the chief engineer,
down, they say the canal will be
built, and within 15 years; that the
mortality of the zone, low already,
will diminish instead of increase,
and that there is practically no yel
low fever or malarial fever on the
Isthmus at the present time.
And if there really is, it is con
cealed with admirable success.
There are people in the hospitals,
but no one knows why. From <time
to time men are missed from their
accustomed places of labor. Occa
sionally natives carrying a long
narrow box may be seen making
their way to the little graveyard on
the hillside. Still no bulletin! are
posted, and few people learn of
these things.
But there is sickness that the
naked eye of the layman can de
tect among the Americans In every
town and camp. Nearly everybody
has it. That's homesickness. Soma
men purposing to work on the
isthmus get as far as the camp to
which they are assigned, where
they work a week or till they
have the price of the return pas
sage; others, more fortunate, have
the wherewithal when they reach
Colon, One glimpse at that dismal
city and they invest it in a trip
home. About half, heroes every
one of them, stick.
"Make a stake; then skldoo."
It's the big money that attracts.
Here are some of the wages paid:
Steam shovel men, $210 a month.
Railroad engineers, $180 a month.
Plumbers, 75 cents an hour.
Stenographers, $125 to $150 a
month.
Boilermakers, blacksmiths, etc.,
65 cents an hour.
Asthma Sufferers Should Know.
Foley's Honey and Tar has cured
many cases of asthma that were
considered hopeless. Mrs. Adolph
Buesing, 701 West Third street,
Davenport, lowa, writes: "A severe
cold contracted 12 years ago was
neglected until it finally grew into
asthma. The best medical skill
available could not give me more
than temporary relief. Foley's
Honey and Tar was recommended
and one fifty cent bottle entirely
cured me of asthma which had
been growing on me for 12 years.
If I had taken it at the start I
would have been saved years of
suffering." Watson Drug Co.
BTANDARD DINING CARS
TRAINS 16 AND 16.
To accommodate tTie Increased
travel on trains 15 and 16 —the
"Spokane-Puget Sound local"—the
Northern Pacific has replaced tho
"grill" oars with "standard" diners,
beginning Sunday, July 8. Break
fast will be served, westbound, at
6 a. m. to take care of Tacoma pas
sengers before sleeper is cut out at
Auburn.
! The men who have been long up
on the isthmus manage to pinch out
levity at the expense of each party
of new arrivals. It's their only fun.
They have a cheerful little song
with which they greet the new
comers. It comes from some pop
ular air In the states, and It runs:
"Another little job for the under
taker,
A little more work for the casket
maker."
Their table talk is equally cheer
ful.
"Understand seven new cases of
yellow jack down at Emppire, and
that they're keepin' It quiet.
"Yes, and I hear they're talking
TO OUR FRIENDS AND CUS
TOMERS:
We beg to announce the removal
of our pharmacy from 401 Riverside
avenue to 421 Riverside avenue.
While we are not now on a corner,
we are only a few doors west of
our old location, and very central.
We wish to assure you our stock
will be kept very complete and up
to the highest standard.
We desire to take this opportu
nity to thank you for your liberal
patronage In the past, and to as
sure you of our desire to serve and
please you In the future.
Plaoing our services at your
command, we remain,
Very truly yours,
WATSON DRUG CO.,
Phone 459 421 Riverside Aye.
The only fuel that does
not spread heat
throug the
Kitchen or House is
Clean, Cheap,
Convenient
SPOKANE FALLS GAS
LIGHT COMPANY
No other travel-book tells as much about the Great
Northwest as does
"WONDERLAND 1906"
Its chapters deal with Puget Sound, the Columbia
River, the Quenlut Indians, tho Bltterroot Range of
Montana, the Yellowstone National Park.
SEND IT TO YOUR EASTERN FRIBNDB.
There's nothing better as a guide to the splendid
country between tho Mississippi and the tide waters
of the Pacific. Send six cents for a copy, or send
the six cents with the address of the friend to
whom "Wonderland 1900" Is to be mailed, to
A. M. CLELAND, General Passenger Agent,
St. Paul, Minn.
Northern Pacific Railway
Three Trains Dally In each direction between St.
Paul, Minneapolis, Duluth and Superior, and the
GREAT PACIFIC NORTHWEST
Fine Old
WHISKIES
$LOO . Full Quart
St. Louis Beer
121 Howard St. and Durkin'a Corner and Sprague Aye.
Phone 731. Free Delivery.
of quarantinin' Colon. Then we
would be in a fix if it came hard
and we wanted to go home." >•
All this for the benefit of tha
untried. As If merely being hera
weren't trouble enough. Its tha
simple life with a vengeance. Your
eat, you work, you sleep—lf you'r4
well. Today Is as yesterday was,
tomorrow will be as today. So lt'a
a good place to save money. Ift
you don't drink, gamble or import
luxuries from the states you have"
a hard time spending $40 a month*
"Blondio" Woods of Fosselmati
Bros, has returned from a trljj
through the Palouse country. ,
GAS
806-810 Sprague Aye.
5c Big Glass
DURKIN'S

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