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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, March 26, 1907, Image 4

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DEMOCRATS TO
RATIFY THE
PRIMARY
I
The democratic city central com
mittee met In the municipal court
room !a*t night and concluded that
the direct primary is the thing they
went. Thomas Maloney brought up
a knotty point under the new law
In regard to nominating committee!
men. No declarations are filed for
these places and the result is no
one is formally listed for commit-J
lee choice. Maloney proposed that
lists of those willing to serve he
secured and posted in each precinct'
in order to form a basis for voting'
for new committee men.
The central committee last night
gave the executive commit
tee power to call a ratification
meeting after the primaries and to
appoint three new committee men
for the new precincts. The execu
tive committee comprises Frank P.
Hogan. Thomas Maloney, James
Oeraghty and H. B. Merritt.
The old line democrats wanted a
convention before the primaries so
as to settle upon some platform.
The sense of the meeting, however,
was that tinder the direct primary
system, every candidate has his
own platform. When the executive
committee calls the ratification
convention after the primaries, a
platform will be constructed.
It was decided to instill in the
breasts of democrats the idea that
preclnd men must get together
and settle upon the committee men
wanted, as spaces will be left on
the ballots for their nomination.
These will afterward make up the
ratification convention and will
take the place of the delegates in
the Old system.
JAGGED ORATOR GIVES
DEMOCRATS ADVICE
Some good comedy was Involun
tarily put on last night at the
democratic central committee meet
ing. A stranger rolled in early in
the game with about a three
quarter cargo of "wet goods."
Things were just about ready for
adjournment when the befizzled
wayfarer arose and after mention
ing that lie was one of the pioneers
who had blazed the way—he didn't
say which way—and that he was
likewise a democrat, he began a
noise that probably appeared to
him like a Speech. Commissioner
O'Brien arose while the stranger's
oratorical efforts were at flood) ide
and omved for adjournment. Tbe
motion was seconded and carried
and everyone walked out. leaving
the stranger gesticulating with
drunken gravity to the ujstlce
bench and other pieces of furni
ture.
WANTS NEW MAINS
Commissioner Roy, head of the
■water department, yesterday after
noon sent a communication to the
finance committee of the city coun
cil, asking its endorsement of a
plan to appropriate 118,016 for
building new mains in Lidgerwood
park. Water from tbe new system
was tinned in the old pipes a few
days ago and they burst. These
old pipes have been In service Hi
years. Roy recommends that
kaolin pipes be put in. The finance
committee will present Roy's
proposition to the council tonight.
MILLS START AT PORTLAND
PORTLAND. Ore.. March 26.—
■killed labor in the sawmills has re
turned to work and enough men
procured to Start the plan's. It Is
believed the strike is ended.
Said Wit to Wisdom—
"A full stomach makes
a light heart."
Said Wisdom to Wit—
Uneeda
Biscuit
in dust tight. /ZC
moisture proof packages. & M
NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY
MOORE TALKS TO
MEN'S CLUB
C. Herbert Moore, republican
candidate tor mayor subjecl to the
primary, addressed the Men's cluh
of the Jefferson st. M. K. church
last evening on the subject of city
administration. He endorsed the
direct primary as a move in the di
rection of clean politics and urged a
full registration for the coining
election. Mr. Moore argued that
integrity and ability are tho quali
fications candidates should be
judged by. He also favored strict
er police regulations in this city.
SNOW HOUSE A GRAVE
I FOR IWO BOYS
NEW YORK, Match 20.—One of
the most remarkable fatalities of
the winter was the one in which
John and Edward Mears, boys, met
their fate.
Tlie lads had built a snow house
by piling wet snow against a fence
and then digging out the interior
They were inside passing out snow
to other boys, who were taking it
away. The Mi ais lad had exca
vated to the fence, when those out
side saw the ma-is begin crumbling.
Tin i 1 cries of warning were toe.
late Thf heavy snow collapsed up
on the two boys and when they
Were dug out they were dead, hav
ing suffocated.
JEROME ON THEIR TRAIL.
NEW YORK. March 28.—Jerome
and the police commissioners hnvr
begun an investigation of the Pa
trolmen's Benevolent association.
Under the guise of a "mortuary
fund" it is reported the policemen
have been assesed at total |125,000
for the purpose of influencing legis
lation they are interested In.
UPHOLDS LIABILITY LAW.
MACON. Oa.. March 26. -An
other federal court decision uphold
ing the employers' liability act was
rendered in this city by Judge
Speer in suit against a railroad.
Tliis makes 3 judges who have sus
tained the law to 2 who held it
unconstitutional. Judge Hanford of
Washington, is one of the former.
CUSHMAN FOR HERMANN
WASHINGTON. D. C. March 26.
Representative Francis Cushman,
of Washington, teslified to the good
character of Binger Hermann, on
trial for destroying copy books
while land commissioner. S. A. I).
Puter, on redirect examination,
said in several deals prior to his in
dictment he was paid |5,000, some
of which Senator Mitchell got
when he came to Washington seek
ing aid In pressing claims before
the department.
EMPLOYMENT OFFICE KICK
H. Williams reported to the po
lice this morning that the Seandia-
American Employment Co. had
charged him $1 for a Job at St
John. He was told that the train
left at 8 o'clock this morning. He
learned afterward that tbe train
had left at 7. Then the agent
wanted to send him somewhere
else. He also says they won't pay
bach the money.
DIES BENEATH WHEELS
WENATCHEE. March 26 -Los
ing his grip while riding on a
freight train In the mountains.
Joseph Graham, of Denver, fell be
neath the wheels and was cut to
pieces. —'
FIND SACK OF HUMAN BONES
MILTON, Ore., March 26.—Two
skeletons in a sack stowed away in
the loft of a deserted farmhouse
has been found near here. There
was only one skull among the
bones. Officers are investigating.
THE BINGER HERMANN CASE
Special Ct'.TtKpoiidence to The Freer
WASHINGTON. March 25 —The
government's prosecuting officers
are trying hard to send to jail Bin
ger Hermann, ex-commissioner ofi
public lands, and member of con
gress from Oregon. Besides the
case which has been on trial in
Washington. D. C. there are indict
ments and prosecutions waiting for
him at home.
Hermann is one of half a dozen
prominent men charged with con
spiracy to defraud the government,
and Hermann is the only big fish
that has so far escaped the net.
The conspiracy of which Her
mann is accused is said to have
been entered into while Hermann
was commissioner of lands. It is
alleged that through the influence
of Senator Mitchell, who was to be
paid $50(t for his services, certain
lands iv Northwest Oregon were to
be set aside as a forest reserve, to
be known as the Blue Mountain for
est reserve. Surveyor General Mel
drum with one Corenson. Mitchell
and others were to be given ad
vantage of this advance information
to get possession Of the school land
sections. By paying $1.25 an acre
and getting some person to sign a
"release of a right to purchase"
Bits o' News
Room 2 of the Minnesota house
was entered by a sneak thief last
night ami a (heap watch and some
small change was stolen.
Mis. .1. T. Onto. 403 Sixtli ay.,
will entertain the ladies of the
North Side chapter of the First
Presbyterian church Thursday af
ternoon.
Thomas Trant, who appealed to
th" city police department about a
week ago for protection against
ghosts, was committed to the in
sane asylum by .lodge Sullivan.
The meeting announced by the
New Thought league for tonight
lias been postponed till April !».
when it will be held in the league
rooms of the Auditorium building.
The Ladies' Aid society of tho
Corbin Park Congregational church
will meet Thursday afternoon at
the home of Alts. John D. Jones,
4:13 Cleveland ay.
The Spokane branch of the
Slot pels of ihe World will meet to
night to make final arrangements
for tbe banquet they will give at
the Hotel Spokane Friday evening.
Old settlers comprising the Spo
kane County Pioneers' association
will hod their 11th annual meeting
April 2 in Justice Stocker's court
room at the court house. A picnic
will follow the business session.
Prank Hockenberry and Klmer
Smith, two IT year old boys, were
arrested by Patrolman Lister this
morning and charged with stealing
syphon bottles. The boys had
sacks filled with bottles and junk.
Arrangements are being made by
the 150,000 eluli for a mass meet
ing in the high school auditorium
April 10 at which Congressman
Wesley L. Jones will speak upon
the work of congress for eastern
Washington Interests.
Hey. B. Russell Nance, the Pres
byterian evangelist who bM been
at work in this city for nearly three
months, addressed his farewell
sermon to a large audience In Cen
tenary Presbyterian church last
night. A reception will be given
him at Bethel church tonight.
A committee of Methodist min
isters consisting of Revs. Brown,
Kimball and Durbahm, has formal
ly decided thai the "gift of ton
gues'' excitement at the City mis
sion is merely a delusion. The dis
turbance was never deemed any
thing else except by the Spokane
Chronicle.
Patrolman Bunker yesterday ar
rested A. H. Mitchell, age 17, and
booked him at the police station
for larceny. The boy was trying
to pawn a watch which had been
stolen from J. E. Jones' room in
the Montvale block.
Joe Young and Mike Ring left
this morning for the Pease River
country In Rrltish Columbia. They
will mine for placer gold.
TRIBUTE TO THE DEPARTED
The following memorial ha?
been adopted by the directors of
(be Interstate fair:
Resolved, thai In the death of
Mr. Ham (!. Btlmmel, our late di
rector, this association lias sustain
ed a great und Irreparable loss.
By his ability, generosity and de
VOtion to the public interests of
Spokane, he has been of great value
to the community. His friends and
associates will feel very greatly
the loss of his whole-souled com
pany and his able cooperation in
both social and business pursuits.
This board wishes to express to h.s
family its profound sympathy in
their bereavement.
D. L. Huntington.
R. V. Cartler Van Dissel,
D. T Ham
The Press Is the only pennj pa
per in the Inland Empire. —
SPOKANE PRESS, TUISDAY, MARCH 26,1907.
these lands could he corralled by
the conspirators before anyone sus
pected what was to happen. Then
as soon as the reserve was created
the government would issue "ileu
land scrip" for these lands, giving
their holders a right to take In
lieu of these lands any other public
lands outside the reserve.
The profit was to come from lo
cating on valuable timber lands
with the lieu scrip. It is figured
that the men in the deal were to
clear 1750,000.
What first aroused suspicions of
Secretary Hitchcock was the ac
cidental discovery that a special
agent of the department named J
S. Holsingec bail made a report
showing up land frauds and that
Hermann had held up that report
for more than a month.
"Your resignation is requested."
said the secretary.
Hermann secured a short delay,
and during that time it is alleged he
destroyed "o letter books which
contained traces of the conspiracy.
Senator Mitchell was convicted,
but died before sentence was exe
cuted.
Hermann has claimed right along
that he was persecuted. He is put
ting up a hard fight.
WANTS $10,000
FOR HOSPITAL
Ten thousand dollars for new
buildings at the isolation hospital
is asked by the board of health in
a communication today addressed
to the city council. The board
wants the city to appropriate the
money for needed enlargement to
the present quarters. During the
past winter the isolation hospital
has been crowded and with tht
growth of the city it is expected
that next year the quarters will be
entirely inadequate.
The board also asks the council
to change the health onlinance
with relation to the payment' of
nurses. The present ordinance
stipulates the employment of
nurses at $2.."50 a day. The board
wants the amount to be paid left to
its discretion, using for argument
the fact that competent nurses will
not work for $2.r>o a day on small
pox cases.
WASHINGTON, 1). C, March 26.
—By direction of the president.
Secretary Hitchcock has issued an
order against fencing public land
and instructing agents to vigorous
ly prosecute violations.
TRENTON, X. J.. March 26.—
Judgment for $1,134,748 was record
ed in the supreme court against
the Pennsylvania road, owing to
failure to obey an order of the chief
justice to pay one-half of 1 pet
cent tax under the Perkins law.
BLACK&WHffi:
'^.HAT SHOP ;., K >
EVERY
MAN
should have an up to date
cap or two. They are the
only thing for out-door sports
and cloudy weather.
See show window for fhe
new styles.
S8 HOWARD
WALL PAPER
PAINTS. VARNISH OILS. ETC.
We are now open for business
and are prepared lo give yon
the best at the lowest figure
Keniember, we are in the low
rent district.
R. Zimmerman
Phone 3992. 01715 Monroe
Get a Kodak
Don't let another spring go
by without a camera. You need
one. From $1.00 up.
Jones ® Lovejoy
719 RIVERSIDE AYE.
WATCHING THE
PUGH WING
"Watch the Pughs for the next
24 hours" is the instruction given
every morning by democratic lead
jers to committee men. Sudden
| Pugh moves in favor of W. J.
j Doust for the republican nomina
tion for mayor before the direct
| primary are hourly expected. The
i suspicion has gone forth that the
Pughs, on account of their control
of the court house machinery, will
try to beguile the "tenderloin" sup-
J port from the democrats by threats
|and duress. The Pugh wing is op
j posed to C. Herbert Moore on an-
I other score. Mr. Moore as foreman
of the so-called grand jury indict
jed E. E. Irwin, county treasurer,
I and Robert Koontz, county clerk.
lon the charge of taking campaign
j assessments from their deputies,
i The republicans today are split
wide open with the court house
ring against the field.
Registration has now passed the
10,000 mark and today has fallen off
considerably. There remain 1!>
days yet and it is expected that in
that time the books will show con
siderably more than 12.000.
SALOONMAN IN TROUBLE.
Detective Briley yesterday after
noon arrested R. C. Boyd, a saloon
man of Pueblo. Col., on complaint
of C. C. Dempsey, hotel man. who
said Boyd had sold him three whis
key certificates for $140, part of
which was paid over in cash. Demp
sey communicated with the Old
Sam'l Galland, Pres. Henry Boesman, Secy.
The Granite Safety Deposit Co.
Open for Business
WE INVITE YOUR INSPECTION OF OUR
Massive Vaults
Constructed by the Diebold Safe & Lock Co. Absolutely
Fire and Burglar Proof.
Basement of Granite Block, Riverside and Washington
CUT DOWN
Household Expenses
Every owner of record of 50 or more shares of
stock in the Pacific Thoroughbred Poultry Co.
acquires therewith the privilege to buy eggs,
Iressed poultry., etc., from the company at the
jame price asked wholesale dealers.
OPENING PRICE
A SHARE FOR STOCK IN THE PACIFIC
THOROUGHBRED POULTRY CO.
FIFTY SHARES COST ONLY $5
TEN DOLLARS BUYS 100 SHARES
rhe stock is selling fast. Better get yours today.
Call on or Address
Pacific Thoroughbred
Poultry Co.
Dr. J. T. Guerin, President Manager.
>03 304 Columbia Building, Corner Ist Aye. and
Howard St., Spokane, Wash.
Office cpen even ngs 7 ti 9p. m. v\e:k days. Sundays from
10 a. m. ta 1 p. m. Telephone 2515.
Times Distillery Co. in Kentucky
and ascertained that Boyd had not
yet paid for the firewater. The
charge is obtaining money under
false pretenses.
PRINTERS GOT READY
FOR TROUBLE
GOLDFIELD, Nev„ March 236 —
Setting type and making up a news
paper with guns in handy reach is
the experience the printers on the
Chronicle of this city have gone
through during the recent Indus
trial Workers of the World excite
ment. The workers declared a boy
cott on the paper and ordered the
printers to leave town. Instead of
complying the printers organized
for trouble and prepared a warm re
ception for anybody that invited it.
They are still getting out the paper.
JURGEN'S
Grocery Company
Cash is King. Quality Is Queen.
SPECIALS
Old Dutch Cleanser, 3 for. .25c
Soap. Mascot. 8 for 25c
Brooms, each 30c
Lamp Chimneys, No. 1 or
No. 2. each 10c
Farina. 2 pkgs for 25c
Egg-o-See, each 10c
Ammonia, bottle 10c
Blueing, bottle 10c
Call us up. We deliver.
905 Sprague. Phone 122.
THE RITE OF RITING
RIGHT
3y B. WRIGHT.
Origin of the Seven
The letirnhig of shorthand lias been an
achievement accomplished only by the few.
These ingenious ones have recognised the
economy that it lias offered and have
been awake to the faults of the old script sys
tem. As a result, over sixty systems of short
hand have been devised. With all their faults
tliese systems have done this: they have proven
beyond a shadow of doubt that shorthand is,
practical and is a necessity. Each of these sys
tems had its faults. Each had its points of
merit. The work of the SEVEN parliamentary
reporters in London was to extract the good
from the bad from all systems.
Chicago Educator Comments
On this they worked for several years and
their efforts were crowned by having not simply
the most rapid, simple and legible shorthand,
but one of which a prominent Chicago educator
recently exclaimed, "So-simple! So easy! The
child should learn it before he does the long
hand, and soon we will all be writing it."
Basis of Her Opinion
This educator knew of what she was speak
ing. The picture was not too rosy. To the one
who has not investigated it seems too good to
believe that throughout the child's whole
school course he will he able to write as fast as
the teacher dictates, which is about eight times
faster than he now writes. In other words,
seven-eighths of the time that he now uses
while writing in school will he saved by him. If,
therefore, any perchance not understanding
has been offended by the placards about town —
Mellican Kid Great Big Foolie
alie timee go to schoole," we here extract any
such feeling, for we did not mean that he was
foolish for going to school, but we wished to
set yon thinking upon the fact that it was fool
ish for the hoy to go to school so long. In other
words, that by properly beginning he might
save seven eight hs of his writing time in school.
It was put in that ambiguous way for the ex
press purpose of attracting attention and stir
ring up thought.
The Chopped Up X
Many who have been watching the picture of
the irate Chinaman, who says, "Me chop Melli
can X," have in fact chopped or analyzed X in
t.O the eight strokes which are used to make it.
If you have not done so, just try it now. There
is the up stroke. The-circle at the top. The
down stroke 4 . Then the short up stroke. Tho
stroke coming to the body of this. The stroke
from there down to the base line. The circle
at the base line and then the last or finishing
stroke. Is there any reason why these eight
strokes should be taken. The logical letter is
one stroke. It reminds mo of
The Story of the Wolf
Have you ever watched a dog when he goei to He down?
He will spot tlio place and then turn around it two or
three times, Why does he do it? The theory advanced
is that because in ages past his ancestor, tho wolf, who
roamed the plains, did so to lay the grass In proper shape
for a bed. The dog does not have to do so now, hut lie
does II just because his fathers did. "There is likewise no
reason why a man should whirl eight limes around a "k"
while making il. He does It Just because way back in the
ages a letter was a picture of a thing and people have
been ever since trying to imitate thai picture. Thai is
the reason shorthands have sprung up. II was Ihe cry
of science for economy. Have you ever wondered why
your hoy becomes so poor a writer when he gets into
high school? The tongue takes one stroke to make a
sound. The pencil takes six. He tries to make the pen
ell keep up with the tongue and his writing came out In
about the same shape as did the Dago who hitched him-
self to the back of the North Coast Limited. There are
121 Strokes in the Longhand
alphabet. There are only 2f> letters; one stroke to the
letter is the natural, logical and only proper way. For
the purpose of aiding in showing this and fixing in the
memory the shorthand alphabet the SEVEN SHORT
HAND COLLEGE, with temporary offices at 714 River
side, lias thickened certain parts of the script alphabet
to show that the shorthand alphabet is a part and only
a part of that alphabet, The college would be delighted to
' have you examine this. In other words we mean to show
that
Shorthand is the Kernel; the Rest the Chaff
which It has threshed off and thrown away. There are
many things about shorthand, however, which the time is
not ripe to teach the children, at least at the beginning.
Koi instance, there Is in reality no c sound. Soft c Is s
and hard c Is I<. They are taught al the beginning to
spell words jnst as they spell them now. They are
taught Ihe full alphabet. While the teacher Is wrong and
the child is right WhSU the child gels whipped for spell
ing "cat" "k-a-t," yet In these points it is Inadvisable to
break away from the past. While all shorthand reporters
spell cat. k-a-t, we teach the child to spell It cat. He Is
also taught to write the vowels whether sounded or not.
Litter on those who go in for a special course of swift
writing are taught to drop the unsounded vowels and are
taught all the shortcuts "f all shorlhnnds.
Older pupils who come to the college are like
wise taught the swiftest principles first.
"SEVEN" SHORTHAND COLLEGE
INCORPORATED
714 RIVERSIDE AVENUE.

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