OCR Interpretation


The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, April 13, 1908, Image 4

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1908-04-13/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

4
HERE'S GRAFT THA T
LILLEY SHOWED Ui
Special Correspondence to The Free*
WASHINGTON. D. C, April 13.—
Representative George L. Lilley's
arithmetic shows that the govern
ment did pay the Electric Boat Co.
more than $1,000,000 in excessive
profits for submarines. Whether
Lilley's figures are correct will be
determined by the investigating
committee.
The figures submitted by Lilley
are taken from the transcript of
the testimony of Rear Admirals
Melville, O'Neal and Bowles before
the house naval affairs committee
in 1901 and 1902. All of the fig
ures are therefore from the official
records.
Admiral O'Neal testified he be
lieved $100,000 apiece a fair price
for the Holland submarine. The
contracts of which Lilley complains
call for a purchase price of $285,000
a boat.
Admiral Bowles, who is now em
ployed by the Fore River Shipbuild
ing Co.. the builders of the Holland
submarines, testified before the na
val affairs committee he had made
a careful investigation of the con
struction of the submarine, and
thought the boats might possibly be
worth $125,000. He considered the
great expense the builders were put
to in experimenting, and the value
of their patents. He believed $125.-
--000 per boat would give the build
ers a "handsome profit."
Using the estimates of Admiral
Bowles, who was chief of the bu
reau of construction and repair of
the navy department when the tes
timony in question was taken, Lil
ley's figures show the Electric Boat
Co. received since 1899 an excessive
profit on 19 submarines of $1,519,-
--738.
If the government purchases the
eight submarines recommended by
the naval affairs committee, Lilley's
figures show the excessive profit to
the Electric Boat Co. will be $1,-
--471.520.
Lilley has shown the Electric
Boat Co, in a unique position The
concern does not manufacture
submarines. It makes a business
of getting government orders for
HERE'S WHAT THEY EXPECT
TO FIND AT THE NORTH POLE
HOW THEY EXPECT TO GET INTO THE HOLLOW EARTH
Special Correspondence to The Prose.
NEW YORK. April 13—The Win.
Reed Hollow Earth Exploring club
has just been incorporated. The
purpose of this strange organiza
tion is to prove by experiment that
the earth is hollow and that such a
thing as a north or a south pole
does not exist.
It is the theory of the men plan
ning the trip to the inside of the
earth that there's a hole where the
north pole ought to be. By means
of balloons, submarine boats, gyro
scopes and high explosives they ex
pect to slip over the edge of the
earth's crust into the inside of tne
shell and there find continents and
kingdoms yet unseen.
The executive committee of the
club has talked of two starting
points for their explorations. One
is in Norway and the other in
Greenland. Roy Knahenshtte, the
aeronaut, has been asked to take
charge of the balloon experiments.
Wm. Reed, the former insurance
man who heads the club, says it is
prepared to spend $1,500,000.
"It's time for action now—not a
time for mere talking," said Reed
when seen at his home. "But the
earth is hollow and our investiga
tions will soon prove it. The poles
so long sought are but phantoms.
There are openings at the southern
and northern extremities of the
earth. In the interior are vast con
tinents, oceans, mountains and riv
ers. Vegetable and animal life is
evident in this new world. And it
is possibly peopled by races yet un
known by dwellers on the earth's
siirtace."
"Our equipment is to be nothing
but the best," said W. S. Rookey,
tlie business manager. "We shall
REGAL SHOES
Shoes For Easter
Our stock is com
plete. We have
the latest novel
ties and styles
are up to the
minute.
The Regal/
Shoe
and $5
submarines, subletting the con
tracts to the Fore River Ship
building Co.
The boat company, capitalized
for $8,000,000, had seven attorneys
at different times lobbying in Wash
ington. These attorneys often man
aged to draw up motions and bills
to be later reported by the naval
affairs committee. They were thus
able to have the committee recom
mendations so worded that all com
petition was shut out.
Lilley filed with the committee
a series of letters which he said
were genuine, between C. E.
Creecy, attorney for the boat
company in 1896, and former Sena
tor Butler, of South Carolina,
which shows the system of pro
cedure in procuring prominent
men as lobbyists. The following
is a sample letter from Creecy to
Butler:
"I inclose herewith copy of a
letter from John T. Holland Tor
pedo Boat Co. (name later
changed to Electric Boat Co.) to
the chairman of the committee on
naval affairs of the senate, asking
for an amendment providing for
six Holland submarine boats at a
cost of not exceeding $175,000
each, and hereby associate your
firm with me in the matter, and in
consideration of your services
promise to pay you the sum of
$2,500 on each boat under this bill
that is contracted for by the navy
department, this tee of $2,500 on
each boat being contingent upon
the price bein gpaid our company
of $150,000.
"If the price paid our company
be more than this amount, your
fee is to be increased proportion
ately, and, if the amount paid our
company be less than $150,000,
your fee is to be diminished pro
portionately."
Former Senator Butler admitted
on the stand during the pres
ent investigation that he was at
one titme counsel for the boat
company, but took exception to
the charge he did any "lobbying."
He was unable to recall definitely
how much money the boat company
had paid him.
use Holland boats, dirigible bal
loons, wireless telephone and tele
graph and the gyroscope—in fact
anything that will be of value."
The gyroscope is to be used in
place of a compass for the reason
that the compass has been proven
unreliable by previous explorers.
John P. Holland, inventor of the
submarine, and Hiram Maxim, the
maker of explosives, have been
asked for their opinions on the ex
pedition. Holland believes his boat
can operate under ice, and Maxim
says it can be liberated by the use
of nitrogelatin.
SUSPECTS CAPTURED
Dan W. Downer and Orville Con
ners. believed to be Bafe blowers,
were arrested at Hatton, Wash.,
yesterday by Deputy Sheriff Lyle
and last night were lodged in jail
here for safekeeping. They answer
descriptions of the men who some
time ago blew a safe at Coulee
City. Downer has long been sus
pected of mixing in these things,
and several times has been taken
up on suspicion but afterward re
leased. At Hatton yesterday gome
dynamite, revolver and overcoat
were found in the bushes, and
Downer, it is claimed, owned the
revolver. He denies the charge.
GOOD FRIDAY CANTATA
All Saints Cathedral choir of 40
voices will render the sacred
cantata, "Olivet to Calvary" on
Good Friday night. Edgar C.
Thompson will direct. Soloists are
Miss Jennie Burchett, soprano;
Walter Hook and James Wilson,
tenors. Each of the events of holy
week are described in song.
S7 Washington
Hutton Building
SA VED FROM MERRY WIDOW HA T TERROR
Have you noticed that the "Merry Widow" lid is being chased to the woods? Yes, it's beginning to
give way to the "Mary Garden" hat. See the lower left-hand corner of the picture? Well, that evplains
why all the men are voting for the "Mary Garden." The cowboy turn-up of the front brim of the latter
Is very comforting after a few experiences with the "Merry Widow." And the big brim is there just the
same, so that the "best girl in town doesn't lost anything in hat area. In the above, drawn especially
for this paper by staff artist, are sketches of real incidents from .life, in which the "Widow" and the
"Garden" have taken prominent part.
ENGLAND'S NEXT PREMIER ANOTHER
TEDDY; BIG STICK, BIG TALK
LONDON. April 13.—With the
coming exit of Roosevelt as the
star on the world's stage. England
expects Herbert Henry Asquith to
succeed him as the strong man on
the international program.
Asquith is now acting premier,
during the illness of Campbell-Ban
nennan, and he will succeed to the
office as a full fledged prime minis
ter as soon as Campbell-Bannerman
gets well.
Then, for the first time in 20
years, the British empire will have
an iron hand on the reins of gov
ernment. Since Gladstone and
Salisbury began to lose strength,
the British lion has not had a
trainer who could exact instant
obedience. Now, a new man has
come to power, who links tho pres
ent with the great days of Peel,
Palmerston, Disraeli, Gladstone and
Salisbury.
In the three months Asquith has
acted as leader of the house of
commons, he has stamped his per
sonality on parliament as no man
since Disraeli. Before the present
session of parliament closes, Camp
bell-Bannerman will resign tne
premiership, and Asquith will he
caluled in to succeed him. When
that time comes the house of com
mons will lie his slave pen. Even
now, with only a deputy's author
ity, Asquith can pulverize opposi
tion and crush discussion by speak
ing a few sharp words.
Asquith is in a class by himself
as a strong man. He combines with
the fearlessness and pugnacity of
Roosevelt, the taciturnity and cyni
cism of Choate, the wide intellec
tuality of the late John Hay and
the debating ability of Bryan. No
i man in British public life can stand
against him in a forensic battle. He
is a lawyer by training, the great
est lawyer in England, and he is as
merciless in the house of commons
as if he were conducting a cross
examination.
I Nobody else in the commons can
treat that great assembly as
j Asquith does. To him, the commons
] appears like a set of schoolboys
before its master. The m. p."s ac
cept this position because they are
afraid of him. There is not one
of the pugnacious members but has
felt the biting sarcasm of Asquith's
tongue, or has gone down beneath
his remorseless logic. Asquith
never has been known to lose a de
bate. No opponent, after a bout
with him. has been satisfied with
the outcome.
Asquith is an intellectual ma
chine. He has no intimate friends,
for when nature made him she left
out the ability to win affection, and
replaced it with the power to com
pel respect. He has no vanity. Or
dinary human traits seem to have
passed him by. His enemies say
that zoologically, he should be
classed with ells, not because he is
slippery, but because he is so cold
blooded.
Asquith's first great success was
made at the time of the publication
by the London Times of the Pigott
letters, libeling Parnell. Russell
A SAMPLE OF SEATTLE JUSTICE
SEATTLE, April 13.—Because he
was starving and broke into a box
car to obtain several cans of con
densed milk, the only immediate 1
remedy he saw for the gnawing
pangs of hunger, O. Puren, aged 20,
was arrested and sentenced by
Judge Gordon in tne municipal po
lice court to serve 63 days on the i
chain gang.
Thirty Chinese, engaged indus
triously in a gambling game in the
lower end of the city, were arrest
ed and dismissed on March 27 by
Judge Gordon.
On the same date George Bald
win was apprehended with a load
ed revolver in his pocket and was
charged with carrying concealed
LOOK HIM OVER GIRLS AND
SEE IF HE WEARS A "PATCH"
Girls, here's where you can come
right hack at the boys when they
spring that old gag about you wear
ing a rat.
The mate to it is fliat the boys
themselves are wearing false hair.
At least a Spokane dealer says they
are, and he ougot to know.
The fud started in "good ole Lun
non," hut it is in America now.
The boys call them "patches."
Ain't it great?
There are patches to fit over the
had charge of the prosecution of
the Times, fell 111 when it came
time to cross-examine Macdonald
of the Times, the chief witness for
the defense. Asquith was called in.
When he sat down tnere was not
enough of the Times Tase left for
a funeral.
Asquith was home secretary in
the last Gla Istone ministry, under
Rosebery. In 1893 he showed his
courage during a mining strike in
Wales. He ordered out the militia,
the soldiers fired, killing two
miners, and the country shouted
"Murderer." At once Asquith made
HERBERT HENRY ASQUITH
a public appearance, to show he
had no fear of unpopularity. To a
hostile audience he delivered one of
his intellectual speeches. At first
shouts and cat-calls greeted him.
Asquith stood impassive on the
platform, stopping his speech when
the noise became deafening and re
suming at the intervals of compara
tive silence. By sheer resolution
he beat his audience into submis
sion and silence.
Asquith is an opponent of wom
an's suffrage, and not hiding his
opinions, the militant stiff ragets
made an attempt to beard him in
his den. They marched to his
house. To their surprise, Asquith
opened the door, invited them in
and asked what they wanted. They
told him in subdued tones "Votes
for women." "Ladies," he said,
"you have come to the wrong man."
The women departed, almost on
tiptoe, and there was no riot,
afterward lord chief justice, who
HAD BAD CHECK HABIT
The trial of Elmer Harris on a
charge of passing six worthless $5
bills issued by the Merchants &
Planters' bank will begin today in
Judge Huneke's department of the
superior court. Harris' capture was
effected by Patrolman Hogan a few
days after he passed a bill on Mrs.
Helen Wood, landlady of the
Monica hotel.
weapons. He was fined only $20.
Puren is only a big boy. He was
out of work and had no money or
friends. He became hungry and
saw only one way to prevent him
self from starving. Surrounded on
every side by plenty, there was
none upon whom he could call for
the paltry few 1 cents which it
would have taken to stop that hor
rible feeling of emptiness in his
stomach.
He left a note giving his name
and stating that he took the milk
because he was starving. He then
gave himself up. It is presumed
that this is what he was really pun
ished for. He had never been ar
rested before.
bald sprit on the crown of the head,
patches to supply missing forelocks,
and triangular palciies for that
spot a little to one side in front.
The patches come in all colors
and are made to fit so nicely that
they cannot be detected by sight.
And the cheapest of these is $20.
The Press would gladly furnish
a few names for reference, but
there's really no sense in getting
all shot up cm account of a few
, patches of hair.
SPOKANE PRESS, APRIL 13, 1908
♦ THE USUAL REMINDER ♦
It is apparently an easy
matter for a reader to sit
down and write out his ideas
on some subject that seems
to need a dark brown roast
ing, but it is usually an im
possibility for the same
writer to sign his or her ■
name to the communication.
Whereupon it becomes ex
ceedingly simple matter for
the editor to drop the name
less production in the waste
basket. What the average
reader thinks manes up the
public sentiment that gov
erns this country. But it is
not an anonymous form of
government. Neither is the
newspaper business legiti
mately conducted on that
principle.
NOT TOO CRAZY TO
GET HIM A WIFE
CANTON. 0., April 13.—Prof. Os
car Lovell Trigg, who won consid
erable notoriety while a member of
the faculty of the University of Chi
cago by saying that John D. Rocke
feller was a greater man than
ShaJiespeare, was married to Miss
Addie Beall Cox. %% years oid, at
Turlock, Cal. This is of interest
because Trlggs was known as an
advocate Of free love.
Miss Beau's parents live at Can
ton. Last August Trlggs was di
vorced from his wife and at that
time his declarations In favor of
free love were made. The new Mrs.
Triggs was a pupil of TriggS while
a student, at Chicago, and since
then has been interested in settle
ment work in the East.
REPUBLICAN MAYOR
CAN'T CAN OEMS.
TACOMA, April 13. — Mayor
Linck's efforts to transfer the spoils
of city office has hit a snag in a
civil service amendment to the
charter putting the fire, engineer
ing and water and light depart
ments under civil service rule. The
new mayor announced the appoint
ment of a republican fire chief and
intended to name a city engineer
from hiH party. The democratic
incumbents intend to hang onto
their jobs. Under the amendment
they can be discharged only by rea
son of stated offenses and then
upon a two thirds vote of the city
council.
Waves Uncover Loot
of Buccaneers
LISBON, April 1 :t.—Treasure se
creted by Portuguese pirates cen
turies ago has been found by fisher
men at the seaside village of Para
delha.
The village is being slowly wash
ed away by the sea. At the last
onslaught of the waves the earth
crumbled and expoßed to the as
tonished fishermen great quantities
of buried treasure. Many of the
fishermen fell on their faces and
prayed. They attributed the appear
ance of the gold to a miracle.
Gold and silver doubloons, jewel
ed crosses, quaint finger rings, ear
rings, silver censers, and gold goin
were in the find. One fisherman se
cured $600 worth of gold coin.
PUT IN PUMP PLANT
The Commonwealth I.and Co. is
installing a pumping plant at Wash
ington Park t 0 supply 140 families.
The county commissioners have es
tablished a short road to run
through the park and a force of
men are now working on the road.
This will make a short cut to town.
Washington Park is three and one
half miles from Howard and River
side on the Medical Lake line.
Many of the people who have
bought lots are preparing to build.
Mrs. Annie Mitchell, who went to
Palouse to identify a boy said to
he her lost son, Stallanl Webb, re
turned disappointed yesterday. The
hoy answered her son's description
ibut was not him.
Cedar Mill Wood
$1.50 LOAD WITHIN HALF
MILE OF MILL.
Johnson Shingle Co.
Phone 1172. Atlantic and Cataldo
MINING EXHIBIT
FOR SPOKANE
The Stopers at their meeting Sa
turday night decided to call a spe
cial meeting some time this week
for the purpose of arranging a per
manent mining exhibit to be main
tained in this city. The exhibit
will be representative of the entire
mining district tributary to Spo
kane. The Stopers will also take
stepsto list stocks and provide oth
er valuable information of the min
ing industry.
COUNTESS A BURGLAR
NICE, April 13.—Following a se
ries of the most daring hotel rob
beries, the police have captured a
countess and accused her of being
the liurglar.
Strong boxes of hotels and the
guests rooms have been suffering
for months from the depredations
of a cunning thief. The police fol
lowed a clew that led to the apart
ments of the Countess Monteil in
the Cite Gaillard in Paris. Here
they arrested the woman. In her
rooms they found gold and notes to
the amount of 4.000 francs and
jewels worth 20,000 francs. Tho
woman is B well known character
on the Riviera.
GERMS OF DEA TH, NOT LOVE,
LURK IN WHISKER KISSES
PHILADELPHIA, April 13.—At
last a Philadelphia doctor has got
the goods on the man with the
whiskers.
He has proved beyond doubt
that any fair woman who engages
in oscillatory pastimes with whis
kered dandies is in danger of her
life.
The doctor chose for his experi
ment two men. One had a
smooth shaven face and the. other
a beautiful shoe brush on his chin,
with some side adornments be
sides.
Each man was taken on a trip
through the city. They visited
stores and restaurants and rode
through the streets. Then each
returned to the doctor's office and
pressed a resounding kiss on the
lips of a girl who was willing to
make this sacrifice for science
sake.
After each osculation the doctor
pressed a gelatin pad to the wom
an's lips. The smooth shaven
man's kiss registered a few docks
of Innocent germs which got along
peaceably together.
But the other was a microbe
bear garden. It swarmed with
tuberculosis bacilli, typhoid germ,
tetanus microbes, all hungry anil
BENEFIT SALE
FOR THE ENTIRE WEEK AT
THE MILLINERY CENTER
Five per cent of the gross sales will be given to the
Spokane Home of the Friendless
25 Per Cent Discount ENTIRIFsTOCK
Special Millinery Bargains for Each Day for the Remainder of the Week
Tuesday
Every unlrinimed hat and shape in the house
except sailors. All the latest shapes in tbe sea
sonable new blues and butter shadeß; also all
Hats and leghorns, and our beautiful line of im
ported tuscans one fourth off regular
PRICE.
Wednesday
300 dozen ball and fancy hat pins; values to
75c; to close out FIVE CENTS EACH.
All ornament!J a fine line of pressed and cut
steel included, and quills, ONE FOURTH OFF
REGULAR PRICE.
Saturday
The last day of the sale, but the best of all. Our entire stock of French patterns, street hats and
nil trimmed stock hats. Everybody knows this to be the most exclusive line In the city. This will
lie your last chance to get a swell spring hat before Easter, and the prices will attract. ONE
FOURTH OFF REGULAR PRICE.
This sale will not only give you a chance to get good millinery bargains, but also to help one of the
most noble causes in Spokane. Every dollar you spend in our store means 5 cents to the Spokane
Home of the Friendless.
Watch for our daily ad and see the display for each day in our windows.
We will take on an extra force of salesladies' for this sale, amoug whom we wish to announce
Mrs. W. T. Pray, formerly of the Wonder Department Store.
THE TYLER DECLERCQ CO.
822 Riverside Avenue
CHICAGO ALDERMAN'S
IDEA OF HONESTY
Special Correspondence to Tbe Wresi
CHICAGO, April 13—Sh-h-h! A
Chicago alderman says he'd steal
the city hall if he got a chance.
It is Alderman Herman F. Kru
ger, the fattest man in the city
council. At a democratic ward |
meeting Kruger got stirred up over
the recommendations of the Chica
go political societies, the Munlci-'
pal Voters' league, the Legislative
Voters 1 league, the Independence
league and all the other reform
bunches who make it their business
to point the path of duty the voter.
"Honesty!" bawled the stout
alderman. "Bunk! I don't make any
pretenses. Why, honesty's only
skin deep. I'd steal the city hail if
I got a chance!" |
After his friends got the irate
official to sit down, ex-Mayor Carter
Harrison told the story about the
time when a certain alderman
voted the wrong way on a fran
chise.
"Get in." said one of his friends,
"There's $500 in it for you."
"Aw," replied the indignant of
ficial. "I ain't taklh' no toothpicks!"
Thus cnicago politics.
TO HONOR MINISTER
Unitarians tonight will entertain
.Rev. Augustus P. Reccord, of
Springfield, Mass., who is visiting
I western churches.
Cross and ready to go to work.
Naturally the girl does not want
her name used, but she has drawn
the line on any more experiments
with whiskers.
SHERMAN,
CLAY $ CO.
Steinway CBL OtHer
Pianos
Victor Talking Machines
810 Sprague Aye.
The Regal Shoe
87 WASHINGTON
Hutton Block
We Sell the Celebrated
Stetson and
Mallory
CRAVENETTE HATS
'All Hats we sell we clean
and reshape once free.
BROWN ®
SEEHORN
Your Spring Suit
will be right
If You Have
CARLSTEDT
THE TAILOR
Make It.
A fine selection of Imported
and domestic woolens.
422 FIRST AVENUE
TRY OUR
Screened Nut
It's the Best for Range
Phone Us for Prices
WASHINGTON COAL CO.
Phone 2248 SlO Howai
Phone
Main
469
PROMPT AND RELIABLE
SERVICE AT ALL HOURS
H. F. Bowles, Mgr.
INDEPENDENT MESSENGER
SERVICE
Parisian Dye Works
Has no branch offices nor
agents. Office COD feirst Aye.
Phone 2137. . . . L. A. _ehnjann
Thursday
Every yard of ribbons, chiffons and velvet chif
fons and velvetß ONE FOURTH OFF REGULAR
PRICE.
Plain ribbons In all colors and the newest
fancy patterns nl ONE HALF PRICE.
Friday
Veilings and aigrettes will be Friday attrac
tion. A good display of new auto veils that will
pay you to investigate. A large shipment of
heron aigrettes Just arrived for this sale. ONE
FOURTH OFF REGULAR PRICE.
305 RIVERSIDE AYE.

xml | txt