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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, April 14, 1908, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1908-04-14/ed-1/seq-4/

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HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO SUPPORT
A HEN? CONGRESS WANTS TO KNOW
How much does It cost a year to
keep a hen?
The house committee on agri
culture wants to know. Congress
was asked to figure it out by Rep
resentative Olmstead of Pennsyl
vania. A woman constituent had
put it up.to him. Congress turned
the conundrum over to the com
mittee.
Eggs enthusiasts and poultry
sharps differed so widely in their
estimates that the committee de
cided to make a hen house tot hen
house investigation. The result
was no better; the hens couldn't
tell.
Olmstead resents the sugges
tion of the frivolous ones that the
effort is a merry Jest. Statistics
In the agricultural department
back him up. The annual egg pro
duction is rapidly approaching the
two billion dozen marh, and has
averaged a valuation of $150,-
--000,000 for several years. This
does not include turkey, geese and
duck eggs.
Millions of these eggs go to
Europe. Most of them never
come back, yet a few remain for
a year or two and return in those
seasons when the hens go on a
strike.
So the committee, impressed
by the arguments of the depart
ment statistics, is taking the mat
ter seriousy. It has visited farm
yards by the score and is receiving
letters by the bushel. The further
it goes the more it is confused.
"With the corn trust holding us
CONGRESS WANTS INFORMATION. THAT'S ALL
Spend Tomorrow Afternoon at
North Plymouth
and see for yourself that you can buy for $150.00 per acre and on very easy terms, what you would
have to pay for anywhere as near good land and located as close to the center of Spokane, from
$300 to $500 per acre. Make arrangements in person or by phone for free transportation from my
office.
SUPERB LOCATION
within five-mile circle from
business center. One mile
southwest of city limits. Lies
high, level, in fine neighbor
hood.
AN INDEPENDENT
WATER SUPPLY
for domestic use or for irri
gation, if needed, is yours
within lo to 20 feet of the
sin face.
CITY IMPROVE
MENTS
in the way of telephone right
on the property, daily rural
mail delivery and near a
graded school; good neigh
bors.
THE TRANSPOR
TATION
NORTH PLYMOUTH is
reached by fine wufion roads
and is within easy drive to
markets and business center,
making it unnecessary for
you to divide your profits
with tlie railroads.
A survey for the extension
of the Washington Water
Power Co's electric line
passes this property and
plans are forming for its
early completion. Lincoln
station on ihe Medical Lake
electric line, is only one and
one-half miles north, and the
fare to and from Spokane is
but 15c. only "% cents each
way. This Is less than to
any other interurhan point.
R. L BOGARDUS
COR. FIRST AND HOWARD. 32 SYMONS-BLOCK.
PHONE M. 1462. ESTABLISHED 1897.
up it can't be done for less than
$4." writes a Maryland chicken
fancier.
"My neighbor don't spend a
cent," writes another, "he turns
them loose in my yard."
"An industrious hen, with a
saving disposition, can be kept on
$1.25." says a third.
And so it goes. Tho committee
is at sea. No two sections of the
country agree. The Press corre
spondents add these bits of help to
the cause:
Heredity in Hens
CHENEY, April 14.—"Hens are
like human beings." said Josiah
Kemp, "It costs more to keep some
than others. A sensible well mean
ing hen isn't expensive. If she's
socially ambitious and a lavish en
tertainer she comes high, and the
quicker that sort get into the
fricassee the better. Ive a few
trained to drop their eggs fli the
compartments of a packing case,
but sense isn't hereditary in hens.
You can figure till you're foolish,
hut you can't get anything to fit
hens as a class."
Walking Delegate Hens
COLVILLE, April 14.—"The sea
son's short up here," said Frank
Mason, "and hens are more expen-
sive than some other places. Last
year mine averaged about 12 dozen
UNPARALLELED
OFFER FOR
THIS WEEK
To prove to you that NORTH
PLYMOUTH has the water as
well as tlie soil you are
for we make the following ex
traordinary offer for this week
only:
TO EVERY BUYER OF
5 ACRES
for $750 cash, or half cash, we
will dig a well with a good sup
ply of water, curb it in a sub
stantial manner and furnish a
good iron forcepump ready for
use free of expense to the pur
chaser.
TO EVERY BUYER OF
10 ACRES
for $1,500 cash, or half cash, wo
will dig a well containing five or
six feet of water; curb it, fur
nish iron forcepump, with a gal
vanlzi 'I iron tank holding about
2,ub<i gallons of water, together
witli a gasoline engine complete
and ready for use, for house and
for Irrigation, free of cost to pur
chaser.
BEST KIND OF SOIL
It is not black, cold and
frosty, nor is it a sand or gravel
bed, but a deep, warm clay and
volcanic ash loam, free from
rock or waste, every foot till
able. Considerable land has al
ready been in wheat and pota
toes, producing large yields of
both.
eggs. You can't force them. Hens
are the original union labor walk
ing delegates. They know when
they've done a day's work. I fig
ure mine cost about a dollar
apiece."
Has "Lunch Out" Hab"t
LOON LAKE. April 14.—"Hens
hereabouts live the simple life,"
says jonn smitn. larmer. me
Loon Lake hen squats where she
pleases, she has the habit. She isn t
trained to luxury and wouldn't feel
at home in a coop. She's a great
visitor and usually lunches out."
BREWER'S BREW
MAKES HIM BRUTE
While drunk last night Charles
Newbrant. an employe of the In
land brewery, who lives at Ivory
and Tenth, heat his young wife.
She escaped and ran to her neigh
bors, where she became uncon
scions. The police were notified
and Newbrant was arrested. Later
Newbrant quarreled with another
prisoner and in tlie fight that en
sued bit the other fellow's linger.
He was married only about a year
ago. A month ago his wife gave
birth to a baby.
Won't Hire Anybody
That Dances
FORT WAYNE, Ind., April 14.—
"Do you dance?"
S. F. Bowser asks this question
first of every applicant for work in
his big factory. If you answer
"Yes," there is no use lingering
about the premises, for Bowser
won't have an employe that dances.
Bowser is a member of the First
Baptist church and has some strong
opinions which he lives up to.
"I never hire anyone who
dances." says Bowser. "I believe
dancing lowers the moral sensibili
ties and unfits men and women for
doing their best work. The rule
will continue to be strictly en
forced."
CHECK PASSER GUILTY
A jury in Judge Huneke's court
yesterday found Elmer Harris
guilty of passing worthless Mer
chants & Planters' bank bills. Har
ris claimed he got them for work
near town.
FINE, LARGE CROPS
of fruits and vegetables can be
grown without irrigation, and
the very finest with irrigation
from your own independent
water supply, if needed. Or
chardists, gardeners and nurs
erymen pronounce this soil the
best all around soil anywhere
as near Spokane for fruit
growing, gardening, etc.
YOU CAN BUY FOR
$150
what you would have to pay
$:!00 per acre for further out.
On a single acre you save
enough to buy a good horse,
buggy and harness. On five
acres you save enough to built
you a good four-room house
and provide a good well of
water besides. On 10 acres you
save |1,600, sufficient to build
a comfort aide bouse and barn,
with enough left to fence and
set in fruit the entire 10 acres.
GREAT INCREASE IN
VALUE
will be yours by being so close
to Spokane. (our land will
sooner be In demand for resi
dence lois. Eacu North Ply
mouth acre tract contains six
50-foot lots and yon can buy an
acre for $150 —the price they
are selling single lots further
out-—and the terms are almost
as easy With the extension
of tbe electric line this land
will sell like that south of
Manito Park, from $1,000 to
$2,000 per acre.
JEFFERSON Hi
BRYAN SPIRIT
DEMOCRATS CELEBRATE ANNI
VERSARY WITH WIT, ORA
TORY AND GOOD FEED—NOT
TOO MUCH JOHNSON.
The spirit of Thomas Jefferson
pervaded the banquet at the Hotel
Spokane last night in honor of the
165 th anniversary of the father of
Democracy.
Following the satisfying of the
regions within the confines of the
waistband. Pres. Thomas Malony
called the gathering to attention
and Fred E. Baldwin was acclaim
ed president for this year; Lester
P." Edge, secretary, and M. H. Eg
gleston, treasurer. The honor of
president was offered to Mr. Ma
lony, but he declined for the rea
son that he is now serving his
fourth term.
Six directors of the club were
balloted on, but the vote was not
counted last night.
Mr. Baldwin filled the position of
toast master with tact and good
taste and kept the speakers on the
move by not usurping any of their
time by attempting any long intro
ductory speeches himself.
Each time the name of William
Jennings Bryan was mentioned it
was greete dwlth cheers. John
o.Thnson. of .Minnesota, was men-
WHAT CAN HEARST DO
IN THIS CAMPAIGN?
NEW YORK, April 14.—Heavy
work is being done to perfect and
strengthen the national organiza
tion of the Independence league,
the party founded by Wm. R.
Hearst. It will enter the presiden
tial field, probably under the name
of the National party, with a con
vention to be held In Chicago in
July. The convention will be held
after the old parties have named
their candidates and adopted their
platforms. It will thus be in a po
sition to take advantage of any op
portunity that may be presented by
failure of the republicans and
democrats to offer men and prin
ciples acceptable to the plain pees
pie.
Heart's party is the unknown
factor in the presidential problem,
It is decidedly interesting and. in
the opinion of many of the poli
ticians, an important one.
In the beginning the republicans
hailed the nationalization of the
Independence league with mirti}
and joy. Hearst or Folk, governor
of Missouri, were most talked of as
its possible candidate for president,
'and the movement was regarded by
I the G. O. P. as a good joke on the
j democrats. The greater part of Its
vote would be drawn from that
1 party.
I More recently, however, while
i friends of the league have urged
Cedar Mill Wood
$1.50 LOAD WITHIN HALF
MILE OF MILL.
Johnson Shingle Co.
Phone 1172. Atlantic and Cataldo
Phone
Main
469
PROMPT AND RELIABLE
SERVICE AT ALL HOURS
H. F. Bowles, Mgr.
INDEPENDENT MESSENGER
SERVICE
Plan for
Summer Comfort
Don't add the heat of a '
kitchen fire to the sufficient
discomfort of hot weather. \ /
Use a New Perfection Wick* 1
Blue Flame Oil Cook-Stove
aua COOK in cuuuuii.
With a "New Perfection" Oil Stove the preparation of
daily meals, or the big weekly "baking," is done without
raising the temperature perceptibly above that of any other
room in the house.
If you once have experience with the
NEW PERFECTION
l Wick Blue Flame Oil Cook-Stove
you will be amazed at the restful way in which it
enables you to do work that has heretofore overheated
the kitchen aud yourself.
The "New Perfection" Stove is ideal for summer
use. Made in three sizes and all warranted. If
not at your dealer's, write our nearest agency.
The lfayb Lamp
whether high
or low— is therefore fire from disagreeable odor and can
not smoke. Safe, convenient, ornamental—the ideal light.
I If not at your dealer's, write our nearest agency.
k STANDARD OIL COMPANY
(INCOBPOKATKD
SPOKANE PRESS, APRIL 14, 1908
tioned occasionally by some daring
sarit and always groans and jeers
limited.
Walter Foster Johnston, an elo
quent young man who yesterday
afternoon won the oratorical con
test at the high school on the sub
ject of "Jefferson and His Times,"
delivered the oration before the
Jeffersonian democrats and was de
luged with congratulations.
In the absence of Judge M. M.
Godman of Seattle, W. C. Jones re
sponded to the toast "Money or
Men," by saying he never was well
acquainted with money and for that
reason he would take his own topic
"Jefferson and Hamilton." Mr.
Jones has lost none of the clever
flow of language of his wheat chart
days.
Charles H. Jackson of Idaho kept
the ensemble wrapped in interest
of his discussion on "Individual Re
sponsibility." ' Mr. Jackson is con
sidered as smooth a speaker as ever
appeared *in Spokane. He created
merriment when he referred to Mr.
Roosevelt as a man who was at
tempting to regulate everything to
his own ways, even to the number
of babies, in a man's family.
Bruce Blake, who discussed the
political question from a standpoint
of "Then and Now," was hailed
when he arose to speak as "the
next prosecuting attorney."
Other speakers were F. C. Rob
ertson, "Thomas Jetferson"; V. T.
Tustin, "The Inalienable Rights 01
Man"; Hugh C. Todd. "The Young
Man's Point of View"; F. A. Gor
recht, "A Message to Young
Democracy." 1
Sen. L&Follette of Wisconsin as
standard bearer, there has been
less jn hilat ion in the republican
camp. In place of it there have
been looks and feelings of appre
hension. A natural guess would
be, of course, that LaFOllette will
continue his powerful reform fight
within the repttbican lines, but
thought of the mere possibility of
him as an independent candidate
for the White House has given the
elephant chills. Thomas L. HtSgen,
who as tho league candidate for
governor of Massachusetts received
more votes than were cast for the
he;id of the democratic ticket, and
District Attorney Langdon, of San
Francisco, who made a creditable
Bbowing as the league candidate for
governor of California, have also
been brought forward by their
friends as desirable timber for the
presidential nomination.
Heart has given out that he will
not take the nomination. He figures
on being busy fulfilling the duties
of mayor of this city before next
July. At the last mayoralty elec
tion the returns showed a slignt
margin for McClellan over Hearst
for mayor. Hearst claimed to have
been counted out, and made a fight
for a recount through all the courts.
He has won that fight and the re
count will be completed in June.
Friends of Hearst say he plans lo
serve out the term, which runs to
the end of 1909, and to make such
a record as will insure his election.
The mayoralty term here is four
years, and if the Hearst program
should go through he would be a
luminous figure when they begin to
figure on presidential timber in
1912.
Another angle of this year's cam
paign brings Thos. E. Watson, can
didate for president on the populist
ticket, into consideration. The
principles of the independence
league and the platform of the pops,
aro practically without variation,,
and it has been reported that ne
gotiations with a view to effecting
a combination are in progress.
Bryan has been told by Hearst
that the independence league will
not support him and the same thing
app'ies to Johnson.
The main point, however, is that
Heart has the old party leaders
guessing and he evidently proposes
to let that blissful condition con-
This famous
coffee is carefully selected
from private plantations
havinrr established world
fame reputations for pro
ducing the choicest
berries. Is it a wonder,
therefore, that
Chase & Sanborn's
Seal Brand Coffee
never fails to give the
most absolute catisfac
tion ? Their seal and sig
nature on each pound and
two-pound can in which
it comes is a guarantee
of perfection.
Sole Agents
ANDERSON BROS.
511 SPRAGUE
We sold 50,000 lbs. last year.
timie until he gets ready to an
nounce his plans.
Hearst leaders say that their
party polled 400,000 votes in lour
states last year and that to say that
their candidate for president will
get 1,000,000 votes is a conservative
estimate. Some of the more en
thusiastic talk confidently of 2,000,-
--000. Members of a provisional na
tional committee have been ap
pointed in 22 states, and it will not
be long until every state Is repre
sented In the organization. The
New York state convention to se
lect, delegates to the national con
vention will be held May 2.
GARBAGE MAN
APPEALS CASE
Julius Van Damme, whef was ar
rested on a charge of doing a
garbage collection business with
out license, was fined $1 and costs
by Justice 11 inkle this morning, lie
appealed. Van Damme nnd five
other independent scavengers have
undertaken to oppose the city or
dinance which provides that only
the crew/rtory department shall
cart away the garbage.
FEAR HARM HAS COME
TO FRANK MARKS
Frank Marks, age 23, went to
Sandpolnt. Idaho. April 5 to get
work as teamster. He has not been
heard' from by his relatives, who
fear ill has befallen him. This opin
ion was heightened yesterday when
his father, who lives in LO3 An
geles, Cal„ telegraphed that he had
heard bad' news from the young
man. The latter had been living
here with the family of his brother
at 0912 Cedar st.
Yesterday the police were Inform
ed of the case. The missing man is
described as 5 feet 7 inches tall,
heavy, set, with dark hair, com
plexion and eyes.
TRYING TO TRANSFER
PANHANDLE SMELTER
A (leal Is on for the transfer of
the controlling Interest In the Pan
handle smelter located at Sand
point, Idaho. All of yesterday
Herbert Anderson, Messrs. Idnder
man and Bell, M. L. Hewitt and A.
E. Bprlggß were together at the
Hotel Bpokane but did not succeed
in making much progress. The
Panhandle smelter is considered a
good proposition but those at the
head of its affairs have not money
enough to do much,
ADVERTISING GOT RESULTS
NORTH YAKIMA. April 14.—
The Farmers & Merchants' bank
had $54 bills in the window for ad
vertising purposes. The advertis
ing proved so inducing that some
body broke the window to answer
it. He also took the ad away with
him.
HUGHES AFTER WALL ST.
ALBANY, N. V.. April 14.—Gov.
Hughes' bill providing for Ihe ap
pointment of a commission to probe
Wall st. gambling has been intro
duced in the senate. It will be op
posed in the same method that the
anti-race gambling bill was fought.
BEATEN ON STOLEN CHECK
The Credit store, 217 Riverside
ay., was swin. l led yesterday by an
individual said to be named Mc
carty on a bad check for $31. It
Is claimed that MeCaity stole the
check from someone else of the
same name and forged his own to
it. MoCarty is a large man witli
a broken nose.
W. V. Garrett left this morning
for Ely, NOV., where he has mining
Interests, He expects to be gone
three weeks.
Look them
if
over care
fully, you
will find
every ker
nel perfect.
DON'T FORGET
THE
BENEFIT
SALE
At the Millinery Center
FIVE PER CENT OF SALES FOR THE EN
TIRE WEEK WILL BE DONATED TO THE
SPOKANE HOME OF THE FRIENDLESS.
Special Bargains for
Wednesday
500 dozen fancy hat pin values from 25c to
75c. The entire line at, each 5c
Quills
The most popular sailor trimming of tho sea
son" at 1-4 off regular price.
Ornaments
A large line of high grade ornament a and
buckle* at 1-4 On* Regular Prices.
Your Chance to Help the Children's Home.
Tyler De Clercq
Company
822 Riverside Ay.
YOU CAN BUY YOUR
Electric
Fixtures
Cheap at the Empire Electric Co.
We are overstocked <vn fixtures of
every description and to reduce stock
quickly will make special reductions
during the next few clays. It will pay
to get our prices before haying.
Empire Electric Co,
218 Post Street Opposite Post Office
REGAL SHOES
Shoes For Easter
Our stock is com
plete. We have
the latest novel-
ties and styles
are up to the
minute.
The Regal/
Shoe $3.50 $4
and $5
THE SPOKANE PRESS, DELIVERED $5 CENTS PER MONTH
Hutton Building
S7 Washington

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