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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, February 12, 1909, Image 5

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1909-02-12/ed-1/seq-5/

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THE WEB
(Copyright, 1904, by Doubleday, Page & C 0.,)
(Copyright, 1904, by Newspaper Enterprise Association.)
CHAPTER XXI |
(Continued) »
She released h's hands, and, seat
ing herself, motion him to a chair.
"Tell me," she continued, touch
ing the newspaper. "Is anything
more known than is stated here?",
Maddox shook his head. I
"Do you know," she continued,
confidentially, "it Was only yester
day that the possibility of his com-'
mitting suicide occurred to me for
the first time, but I scarcely gave
it a second thought. He had threat
ened to take his own life many,'
many tinieß while I knew him, and
the doctors told me there was a
chance of his doing so, but I never
believed it. He was a physical cow-;
ard, and the drugs prevented him j
from concealing it."
"1 am going home tonight," she
went on. "Did you guess that?"
She paused as she noticed the ex
pression of his face. Maddox
groped for words to soften the!
question which must be asked.
"Aalnslee," he began, very quiet
ly, "what makes you think Lorimer .
committed suicide?"
She stared at him in blank I
. amazement, then touched the
newspaper by her side without re
moving her eyes from his face.
"Why, this, of course. It says so
—doesn't it?"
She drew the paper toward her
nnd suddenly glanced at It.
"No," she continued, "1 see, it
puts a question mark after the
heading, 'Richard Lorimer a Sui
cide?' Didn't he kill himself? Isn't
it true—at all?"
Maddox's heart sank as lie heard
the last words whispered.
"Yes, he is dead," he answered.
'DAVE!" SHE BURST OCT HOARSELY, "YOTJ THINK I KILLED
HIM!"
quietly. "He was shot through his
left side nnd under his arm. No pa
per 1 have seen, except yours, even
hints at suicide."
"Then you—they think he was
murdered?"
Maddox nodded.
"There has been no suggestion
of suicide," he reiterated.
"Hut who could have killed him?
They haven't discovered that?
There was no robbery? Who could
have done It?" she continued won
derlngly. "He had no friends to
speak of, but I never knew him to
qunrrel with any one. 1 don't be
lieve he had an enemy in the
world. Certainly there was no one
who would have wished for his
death unless—except—"
She paused, gazed steadily at
Maddox for an Instant and then
leaped to her feet.
"Dave!" she burst out hoarsely.
"You think 1 killed him! You think
1 am a murderer!"
He rose, and for a heart-beat
they faced one nnother, silently.
Then he laid his ht.nd upon her
arm, Speaking very gently:
"I think of nothing, Ainslee, ex
j sept that you nre my friend and
w the wife of my Mead. We have to
face not what I think or know, but
what other people may Imagine or
believe, and we must face it calmly
nnd brnvely."
She snnk slowly into her chair
and shaded her ever with her hand.
hh though trying to collect hor
thoughts. Suddenly she lifted her
head and began Ipeskitlg rapidly,
but In a low tone ami without ex
citement.
"i am not afraid, But you though
"I am not afraid. But you thought
BY FREDERICK TREVOR HILL
—you think—l can see it In your
face, Day I took that man's
lite, I have worked it all out,
Dave," she continued. "It has come
back to me —my thoughts, words,
actions —your wonderful help and
kindness —everything. I was out of
my mind last night, Dave, but you
saved me, and every detail returns
to me now without any haunting
horror or fear. 1 went to Richard
Lorimer's rooms last evening to
kill him. I confess it. I did not
intend to shoot him. I carried the
pistol only for my own protection.
I intended to prepare an overdose
of morphine for him —to allow him
to drug himself to death. I remem
ber that I carried out this part of
my mad plan before you came.
When I saw you the shoek —the
joy of it cured me. Since then I
have been happy save for a haunt
ing memory of what happened be
fore you came, and I have strug
gled until now to keep my mind
away from it. But it all conies back
to mo now with n rush, but with
no shudder of fear, Dare —without
a shudder of fear." x
Her voice broke on the words,
but the sob was a sob of gladness,
and she smiled happily at him
through her tears.
"What did you do after I left
you at the elevator door last
night?"
"What did I do?" she repeated,
wonderlngly. "I went straight to
my bedroom nnd slept."
"Who knows this?"
She stared at him and shook her
head.
"No one but 1," she replied, sim
ply. "Don't you believe—" She
paused and gazed at him searching-
If, "You don't believe, me, Dave."
she asserted positively,
"It is a lawyer's duty—" he be
gin, but hesitated as she shook
her head Interruptlngly,
"You mustn't be my lawyer,
Dave, if you—if you cannot believe
me."
Me instantly saw the danger of
her tendency and hastened to avert
it.
"You must not be offended when
I disk questions." he. interposed. "1
ask them in order to keep others
from questioning you. Before long
—perhaps in a few hours—you will
lie deluged with questions. Do not
give an interview or answer the
simplest Inquiry without consulting
me. No one knows you were in
Lorimer's rooms last night except
ourselves. There Is not the slight
est reason why any one should
know of it. Yon are not obliged to
testify against yourself, and I have
had the history of your visit from
your own lips, and I could not
divulge It even if I wished."
"You mean —"
"That it has become a confiden
tial communication between lawyer
and client und is therefore privi
leged."
Ho spoke confidently, but she
shook her head doubtfully,
"Yon mean It would be danger
ous to let people Know that you
saw me at his rooms Inst night?"
"Well, It would lead to unneces
sary suspicion and put the author
itics off the track of the real crim
inal."
She shook her head again.
"1 don t like this, Dave," she con
tinned looking up ut bin-, smilingly*
"It isn't lik< you al all. Why should '
we conceal anything? I remember
reading in one of your speeches
that no innocent person need ever
fear the truth. Don't you think me
innocent enough for that, Dave?"
"Yes, yes," he answered, earnest
ly; "but you must allow me to pro
tect you from unjust suspicions and
misunderstanding."
"Not by hiding or suppressing
anything—not by doing what is not
true to your best self. I'd rather
have you testify against me. Dave,
than know you were concealing
something you ought to tell. I'm
sure you do not feel right about
this. I can read it in your face.
You must not be my counsel, Dave.
I am not afraid."
There was a knock at the door.
Maddox called out fin answer and
then stooped and whispered quick
ly in her ear.
"I helped you last night, Ainslee,
did I not?"
She pressed his hand gratefully.
"Then will you not help me
now?"
She nodded slowly and Maddox
turned quickly to the door. At the
threshold stood a hall-boy, who
asked for Mrs. Evans, and behind
him Dave recognized Bradley Par
ker of the detective bureau.
"Mrs. Evans?" he repeated to
the boy's question. "Yes, come in,
Mr. Parker," he added, addressing
the detective, and then as the door
closed, "Mrs. Evans, this is Mr.
Parker of the detective bureau.
My client, Mrs. Evans, Mr. Par
ker."
(To be continued)
HUSBAND ALIVE
AND DEAD
(Special to The Press.)
OLYMPIA, Feb. 12—A Spokane
woman got a divorce from her hus
band and now she claims he was
dead when she got the divorce and
wants to collect insurance and the
supreme court has to decide.
The woman is Tena Rutler. for
merly Schneider. Mr. Schneider
was a hard working, sober, well
liked employe of a Spokane firm.
One day he disappeared, leaving no
trace. His family, brother lodge
members and others have searched
for him in vain for years. He is
gone as completely as though he
had been swallowed up by the
earth. He was a loving husband,
had no business troubles, his busi
ness affairs were in perfect condi
tion and reasons for his disappear
ance cannot even be surmised.
The wife, after his disappearance,
was forced to offer some of the
property for sale but intending pur
chasers refused to buy because the
husband was not there to sign the
deed.
Then on the advice of her attor
ney. Mrs. Schneider brought suit
for divorce on the grounds of de
sertion and June 1, 1900, she se
cured a decree.
That enabled her to sell the real
estate all right.
For years her husband had been
a prominent member of the Inde
pendent Order of Foresters and had
kept up his dues until the time of
his disappearance, The dues for
February and March, 1900, after his
disappearance, were not paid and
the following month he was sus
pended.
The law says that unexplained ab
sence of a man for seven years
raises the presumption he is dead.
Mrs. Schneider waited seven
years and then brought suit to col
lect Insurance from the Foresters
and when the case came up for trial
the attorneys for the lodge contend
ed that because she said her hus
band was alive, when she secured
the divorce, she cannot now claim
he was dead at the same time.
She appealed and the case has
been argued and submitted to the
supreme court.
BACK INTO SHAPE
PRESSING.
We press your Suit, Overcoat or
Gloves, and we clean them so as
to look like new before giving
them the final press. Cleaning and
pressing ladles and gentlemen's
wardrobes Ib our particular busi
ness, and we have made a reputa
tion doing this In first class style,
delivering the goods promptly and
making but a reasonable chargo
for tbe service
UNIQUE TAILORING CO.,
112 Wsshlnotcn St. Phon» M. 735.
Parisian Dye Works
Has no branch offices nor
agents. OfUce 606 First Aye
Phone 2137. L. A. Lehmann
THE BPOKANE PRESS, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12
THEATER
SPOKANE.
"The Girl of the Flower Ranch,"
a musical comedy production, is
the bill for the rest of this week
and Sunday.
ORPHEUM.
The Kitabanzai troupe of eight
Japanese athletes, equilibrists and
jugglers, are exceptionally good at
the Orpheum this week, doing
some of the most sensational work
that has been seen here.
AUDITORIUM.
Three performances will con
clude the Shirley company's ap
pearance in "Sunday." The roman
tic play has taken hold well this
Hemp &t Hebert
The People's Store Corner Main and Washington
Women's cravenette Raincoats
STYLISH $6.00 SHIRTS $3.63
Plenty to choose from. New black, brown or navy blue Panama Skirts in cor
rectly fashionable styles, all lengths and sizes; worth $6.00 each; Saturday's
price #t< $3.63
$7.50 Walking Skirts in Panama or Worsted, black, brown, blue or dark
fancies; choice at only $4.73
Bargains for Men in the Basement
MEN'S SUITS—A big, complete line of tho strongest, neatest, best made, dark
everyday suits you ever saw marked $7.5(1. here at tlie Basement f\f\
price of only «pDsUU
MEN'S SUlTS—Regular $10.00 value and a fresh variety at that; neat, dark
mixtures, well cut and tailored, every size now here; our special tZfi
Basement price of ipOeDU
MEN'S UNDERWEAR—A eh >anup lot of heavy tan shirts and drawers; get
them at half price tomorrow, only 33 c
WORK SHIRTS—In a special lot of oddments from several winter lines; choice
in the Basement at, only 48c
Men's Douglas Shoes
$2.43
A lot of Douglas' shoes for men: the leathers
are calfskin and vici kid; blucher and lace style,
and all sizes in this fine variety; in the basement
at $2.43
Hoys* Hox Calf Shoes—Good, solid leather soles;
three runs of sizes, as follows:
Sizes 2% to 54. $3.00 Shoes, at $1.91
Sizes 13*4 to 2, 12.60 values, at $1.57
Sizes 9 to 13, $2.00 Shoes, at $1.43
Hoys' High Cut Shoes, $3.50 and $4.00 values;
tan or black; pair $2.93
Girls' School Shoes—Good styles in lace or
blucher, kid or calf, as follows:
Sizes 8% to 11, $1.75 values, for $1.17
Sizes llVfe to 2. $2.00 values, for. ..{.#../, $1.37
Special Sale of Wash Goods
Just a cleanup of a big purchase of odd bolts and ends of printed cotton goods
and plain white goods. Come before the week ends if you want these bargains.
American Prints—Blue, gray and black grounds; the best calico on the market
usually 8c the yard, at 5c
Percales—Dark patterns in the l2V£o quality; bolts long enough to cut you aay
length you want; per yard , .* 9* c
Percales in the 15c quality, light or dark '. ;' . 10c
Dress Ginghams—2 to It) yard lengths of genuine Toile dv Xord and Red Saal
ginghnn>s; big variety of patterns in nil colors; special, per yard 9 C
Striped Ginghams—A special lot of gray, blue and dark colored stripes in i2'/>c
quality; special, per yard 8c
Printed Suitings—Light colored corded madras and fancy shirting patterns;
nearly any length and mostly JOe quality, per yard , I2V2C
Wash Suitings—ln another lot of all sorts of lengths; I.V value, at '.. 8c
Persian Lawn—A sheer white lawn worth 20e a yard; only about odd yards of
this; hurry if you want any at the low price, per yard 10c
Lon^cloth—The sort of white longcloth that usually brings Ise to 20c the yard;
we'lly'eut any length you want from this special lot at. yard. ' 9c
IZVaC White Cambric—ttegul ar yard wide goods, mill end price 9c
week and the comedy element has
prowed fl big feature. Next week
the" comfiany will play a comedy
drafna ewtitled "The Westerner."
I 4
PANTAGES.
There is no apparent falling off
In the attendance at the Pantages
as the week progresses. John L,
and his old rival, Jake Kilrain, con
tinue to draw the crowds. Stanley
Johns & Co., in their playlet, "Ac
cording to the Code," ia another
feature.
EMPIRE.
"A Social Outcast" was present
ed at the Empire yesterday and
will hold the boards until the end
of the week. The stock company-
Is doing a good business.
WASHINGTON.
Don I.eno's Happy Youngsters.
For $12.48
WOMEN'S Spring Topcoats in light weights;
tan. gray and oxblood shades in waterproofed cov
ert cloth and dark mixtures in rainproof worsted,
also a line of rubberized silk coats in blue, red,
green, gray, black and some in stripes. These new
coats are worth $15.00. $17.50 ami $20.00 each;
special for this week at $12.48
$1.50 and $1.75 Waists 98c
A large cleanup variety of nice white and col
ored waists, cotton and wool, light or heavier
all in late styles; tomorrow your
.choice at only 98c
; Taffeta Silk Waists—Several different styles
in tailored effects; navy blue, brown, black. These
are all "Marquise" brand, in $0.50 and
$7.50 quality; now on sale at ' $3.95
Men's $3 Flannel Shirts
$1.98
Soft collared winter shirts, in all wool flannel,
in fancy flannel and in the heavy twilled l.orraine
flannel. There are stripes, checked patterns and
plain blue, brown, tan, gray, etc.. and tbe lot in
cludes all sizes from 14Vfe to 17, in these
warm and well made Flannel Shirts at, each.sl.9B
Men's $1.25 Underwear 79c
A cleanup of a good lot of tan colored, heavy,
wool Undershirts and Underdraws in ■ pretty
complete run of sizes. While they last at,
each, only 79 c
Hen's 25c Guaranteed SocKs 15c
The We guaranteed kind: heavy cotton, finely
knit; black, tan. blue, also black with white sole.
We're not the only store selling them, but we are
the only store selling them as low as, pair 15c
representing a class at school on
examination day, lend much mer
riment to the bill at this playhouse
this week. Joseph K. Watson is a
real funny comedian.
OREGON JfflJT OUT
OLYMPIA, Wash., Feb. 11—The
supreme court refused the Maker
River and Shulksan Railroad Co. of
Oregon a writ of mandate requiring
State Secretary Sam .Nichols to per
mit the company to file articles of
incorporation.
Nichols refused to file the articles
some months ago because there is
a Washington corporation of the
same name and the state law pro
hibits duplication of name of cor
porations.
The Oregon company contended
this law did not apply to foreign
corporations but the supreme court
says it does and that the state con
stitution prohibits extending to any
CONTINUED
Owing to the large crowds who could not be accom
modated on Monday to see the
Gans-Nelson Prize Fight Pictures
at the Bijou Dream the management beg to announce
that these famous pictures will be shown every night
this week after 7 p. m. in addition to regular program,
which is CHANGED DAILY.
Don't forget the time and place after 7 p. m. at the
BIJOU DREAM THEATRE
IN PENNY PARLOR, 512 MAIN AVENUE.
NO RAISE IN PRICES. 5 CENTS TO EVERYONE.
foreign corporation any rights not
possessed by those organized under
the l.lws of Washington.
HAS NEW WITNESSES
Argument for a new trial will he
heard tomorrow in Judge Hinkle's
court in the case of J. E. Craddick,
mining broker, convicted of de
frauding Ed Thompson, a miner,
out of $800 in fake mining stock.
Craddick claims to have found four
new witnesses whose testimony
will put a new light on the case.
WASHINGTON THEATER
HIGH CLASS VAUDEVILLE
Week Commencing Matinee Feb. 7
DON LENO'S HAPPY
YOUNGSTERS
in the musical comedietta. "Exam
ination Day in the Township High
School." Mareena, Nevarro & Ma
reena. Sensational Equilibrists.
Joseph K. Watson. Hebrew Come
dian. Flora Drowning & Co., in
"The Hunter and the Maid." Light
ning Hopper, America's Represen
tative Cartoonist. Itiograph.
Matinee daily. Two shows each
evening. Prices 15c and 25c.
PFISTER
VOCALISTS
Afternoon and Evening
Miss Dougherty
Miss Dorothy Lanay
Mr. James Hammock
The ARCADE
Complete change of program to
night. "The Power of Labor,"
"Happiest Day of Her Life," "The
Valet's Wife." 3000 feet of moving
pictures. One hour's performance.
ADMISSION, 10c.
Last few days of HALF
PRICE
Wall
Paper
Sale
Large Selection of
Beautiful Patterns Left
Spokane Paint &
OU Co.
Paints. Glass, Doors, Win
dows, Millwork,
Madison St. and N. P. Ry.
(Adjoining Madison Hotel.)
PHONE MAIN
469
FOR MOVING VANS, MESSEN
GERS AND LIGHT EXPRESS
WAGONS.
INDEPENDENT MESSENGER
4. RAPID TRANSFER CO., INC.
W Chas. H. Muehlman, Mgr.
THREE NIGHTS, COMMENCING
TONIGHT, MATINEE SATURDAY
The big musical hit direct from
Chicago with original company
'THE FLOWER OF THE RANCH'
with Edward Hume
Pretty music, beauty chorua, fa
mous "Pajama Girl" chorus. A
guaranteed attraction.
Seats today. Prices, night $1.50
to 50c; matinee $1.00 to 25c.
SfOKMMTRB
ll| U**OUi» 111.
Jr Chas. H. Muehlman, Mgr.
MONDAY AND TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 15-16
Special Announcement
Mr. E. H. Sothern
Monday—Lord Dundreary."
Tuesday—"Hamlet."
Seats today at 10 a. m. Mail in
your order.
111 *i#APIN4> THfcATUft" HE|
w Chas. H. Muehlman, Mgr
Phone Main 344
Evenings at 8 sharp. Matinees at 2.
FEBRUARY 17, 18, 19, 20.
MATINEE SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 20
Klaw & Erlanger's Greater
BEN-HUR
A mighty play—2oo in production.
Prices—soc. 75c, $1.00, $1.50 and
$2.00. Mail orders promptly filled.
Seat sale opens February 15.
MAT.TO-DAYtX) iTO-MIGHT 6J9 1
I 15-25-50« prices 15-233073* I
"A MODERN POCAHONTAS"
Presented by full blooded In
dians, by permission of the U. 8.
government. Special scenery and
effects. "Six Little Girls and a
Teddy Bear," with Everett Scott
Eight Kitzabanzal Troupe, Japa
nese acrobats and equilibrists. Gas
ton and Green in "Spoonyville."
Nonet te, musician and soloist. "The
Feud," a dramatic playlet with
Laura Hudson and company. Q.
Herbert Mitchell, baritone soloist
and rancontuer. Moving pictures.
Compton's orchestra.
EMPIRE, THEATER
Opposite the Wonder.
"THE THEATER BEAUTIFUL"
V. H. GROVE, Manager.
Today, -the Empire Stock Co. in
the beautiful drama. "A Social
Outcast." Four days, commencing
Sunday, Feb. 14, the delightful
comedy. "Grandpa." Other feat
ures. Miss Mabel Paulson, Soloist,
Moving Pictures, etc. Five shows,
daily. 2:00, 3:15, 7:00, 8:15 and
9:15 p. m. Special matinee 4:30
Sundays. Admission the same as
always, 10c.
MNfAGES' TBEATfR
E. C. Walker, Mgr. Phone 1398.
UNEQUALED VAUDEVILLE
This Week fc
JOHN L. SULLIVAftv '
Champion of all champions. '
JAKE KILRAIN 3
The man who fought John I* 7S
rounds with bare knuckles at Rich
burg, Miss., July 8, 1889. _
s—Other Features—s
Prices 15c and 25c. Matinees daily.
THEAUDITORIUM
H. C. HAYWARD, Mgr.
Phone M. 1242
COMMENCING SUNDAY, FEB. 7,
AND ALL WEEK
197 TH WEEK
The Jessie Shirley Co.
Presenting
"SUNDAY"
Next week —"Jim the Westerner."
. jfc_
WANTED
——— «*
Hoys to sell The Press. Can
make good money. See Gates at
the office, CIS Front avenue, corner
Wall aud Front.

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