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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, February 12, 1909, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1909-02-12/ed-1/seq-7/

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STORY OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN
WRITTEN BY BRAND W
"THE TURN OF
Vv ARTICLE IU.
ON THE OLD EIGHTH CIUCIUT.
IO S E days on
the old eighth
circuit were
probably the
happiest of Lin
coln's life. The
firm of Lincoln
& Herndon had
a dingy little
Ia w office on
the public
square in
Springfield, and
though Lincoln
was very clean
In dress and
person, and
kept all the
thoughts in his
mind in good
order, he could
not keep his of
fice i n order.
II /, a i, r I c, il
many of his legal papers in his
high hat, and sometimes lost them
out of it, and he had a bundle on
which he wrote: "When you can't
And it anywhere else, look into
this." And then, sometimes, he
couldn't even find it there. He kept
poor accounts, and it was hard for
him to make his clients pay large
fees. The other lawyers did not
like this, just as they would not
like it today.
Twice a year, Bprtng and fall, he
went out on the circuit with Judge
David Davis, a large fat man.
Whose mind was its big as his body.
He held court in all the surround
ing counties. Some of the other
lawyers were Leonard Swett. .John
M. Palmer, Judge Logan, Edward
D. Baker, 6. H. Browning and
Richard .1. Oglesby. These law
yers were very smart, but none of
them was as smart as Lincoln.
Lincoln was a great favorite with
Judge Davis, who liked to hear liis
Btories aud tbe tunny things he
was always saying. Whenever
they arrived at tlie hotel in tlie
U}wu where they were Koinn to
a-jiold court. Davis would look about
and ask the very first thing,
"Where's Lincoln?" Sometimes
Lincoln's stories disturbed tlie
court, for if Lincoln were not in
the trial then being held, lie was
apt to hnve a group of metl around
him in lhe court room. Then Da
vis would say: "Mr. Lincoln, I
can't stand this. There is no use
trying to carry on two courts; I
must adjourn mine or yon yours."
Hut in a few minutes he would
beckon one ot the men to the
bench, awd in a whisper would ask:
"What was that story Lincoln was
telling?"
Hut Lincoln was not a mere
\ story-teller; lie was a serious man,
a sad man, and a man of real dig
nity. Men spoke of him often as
"Honest Abe" or "Old Abe." they
did this because they liked him;
but when they spoke TO him they
called him "Mr. Lincoln." As in
most great natures, the humor lay
close to the sadness in him. Men
loved him because he was so kind.
GR O C ERIES!
—THE CLOSE-OUT
Saturday should be because of the additional bargain prices we
have published the biggesl day yet in this closing out sale of fine
groceries. We haven't space here to quote you more than just a
few of the bargain items, lint hour in mind that you may come to
this gale tomorrow and buy hundred! of them at prices as low as
these.
60c Teas 45c
80c Spider Leg Japan
tea 45c
80c fancy Gunpowder
lea 45c
50c fancy Gunpowder
tea 40c
50c Spider Leg Japan
lea 40c
Sardines
16c grade sardines tor.its
20c grade sardine;; for. 15c
86c grade sardines for.2oc
"Tiv grade sardines for .30c
40c grade sardines 10r.35c
i'<f grade sardines for.4os
Preserves
Mr.c l ib. Jars of honey
for 25c
Itric jars t'rosse & Black
well strawberry jam. 30c
3, r ie jars Crosse ft
Hlaekvvoll cur
rant Jelly 30c
S3o Jan Crosse &
Black well mar
malade 30c
HITLOCK, AUTHOR OF
fHE BALANCE"
so simple, so larking in self
consciousness; that is, he did not
think of himself. He had a beau
tiful personality, as we say when
there is something about a man
that makes people respect him,
and like him, and believe him, as
people did Lincoln. He told his
stories to make things clear, for
he was always trying to make
things clenrto men, to judges, to
juries, to statesmen, and finally to
the whole people. He liked the
rough, careless life of the circuit,
and the discomforts of the dread
ful little hotels at which they had
to stay did not disturb him much.
They all sat at table together—the
lawyers and Jurymen and litigants
and witnesses, and even the prison
ers if they were out on bail; nnd
Lincoln would sleep two In a bed
or eight in a room, and never com
plain. He never complained much
anyhow. In the evening they all
sat around and argued and talked,
and he told his stories; but some
times lie would slip away to study
Euclid or German —he was always
studying—and one night the law
yers missed him, and found that he
had gone to a little magic lantern
show given for the children. Hut
he was not always mild, not always
funny; he could be terrible when
aroused, and nothing would arouse
him as untruth or injustice. His
cross-examinations were dreadful,
and he had a strange power over
juries. He sympathized with every
one, was glad when they were glad
and sorry when they were sorry.
And ho knew human nature; that
Is, he knew, somehow, why men
did the things they did —the foolish
tilings and the wise things, the
good things and the bad things.
Some thought him homely; but
when lie was aroused, when he was
in the full swing of a great speech,
his face was bright and he became
beautiful. What told most with
judges and juries was his honesty;
lie was honest ill what he did, in
what lie said, and in what he
thought, He was honest with ev
erybody, and. what is .sometimes
hardest of all. he was honest with
himself, lie never quibbled; he
disliked what are called legal tech
nicalities, and though he had to
argue and debate a good deal, he
would not quarrel or dispute with
any one.
Leonard Sweet has told how he
would try a case. He says he would
sit Quietly In the court room, ad
mitting this or that, "reckoning
lie must be wrong- that "that
UOght to be conceded,'' or "that
ought to be conceded." or "that is
about right." until, as Bwett said,
"about the time he had practiced
through three -quarter! of the case
in this way, his adversary would
wake up to find himself beaten."
lie tried to keep people from going
to law, as all good lawyers should,
though sometime! they forget this,
and he would not take a case he
did not believe in. Once he found
OUI in the very midst of a trial that
his client had acted fraudulently,
and he got imp and left the court
Wines Fourth Off
You know our reputa
tion for wines-—the excel
lence of the stock we car
ry. You know also that
our prices have been the
lowest you feOUld get on
any of these best grades.
And It certainly should In
terest you to know that
until these wines art' sold
you may deduct one-fourth
from our former selling
prices. All our wines
are Included In this sale—
every bottle of every kind.
All will sell, commening
this morning at S: 15, at
ONE-FOURTH OFF
Canned Goods
WONDER BRAND
Tomatoes, 36a large tin 21c
Conn 30C grade 17c
Peas. S6O grade 21c
room in disgust. When the judge
sent for him, he sent back the an
swer that he "gone out to wash his
hands." He was not a good prose
cutor; he had too much sympathy
for people in troube to be that.
He did not make a great deal of
money, not more than $2000 or
$?.000 a year, but he ranked first
among the lawyers of Illinois, and
was engaged in most of the impor
tant cases. One of these was the
case of the Illinois Central railroad
against McLean county. He was
the lawyer for the railroad, and he
kept the county from making the
railroad pay taxes on land the state
had given it, and he had to sue to
recover his fee of $">OOO, which for
railroad lawyers in these days
would be hardly anything. He was
in the celebrated Rock Island
bridge case, and another big case
was over the patents for the Mc-
Cormleh reaper. This case was to
be tried in Cincinnati in the United
States court, and with him in the
case was Edwin M. Stanton. This
man treated Lincoln with great
contempt and rudeness, called him
a giraffe, and would not let him de
liver the argument he had prepared
with such great care. Lincoln was
a sensitive man and this treatment
was most painful to him, and yet
he was a man who rose high above
all little, petty things, and never
got mad at people, or tried to get
even with them. Only people with
little souls do that, and Lincoln
was a great soul. To show how
great he was, he afterwards ap
pointed Stanton secretary of war.
In May, 185f<. he defended Wil
STAUFFER ON
BEANY TRAIL
HOLE IN THE SACK LED
WILEY SLEUTH ON AND ON
TILL HE NAILED A RES
TAURANT COOK.
A broken car seal, damaged
merchandise, a hole in a bean bag
and a beany trail led Superinten
dent Btauffer of the Merchants'
police from B. L. Gordon & Co.'s
about 12 blocks to an Italian res
taurant at 829 Front avenue.
A car loaded with beans was
broken into right before the ware
house door of the Gordon establish
ment last night. Not many pounds
of the Bostonlat) food was taken,
but many dollars worth were
strewn about. Superintendent
Stauffer, like Sherlock Holmes,
followed a long trail of beans to
ward the business center. Sud
denly the trail was lost, for the
burglar discovered the hole in the
bag lie carried. About a block
further another bean lay upon the
sidewalk, then another and finally
another. About 20 minutes later
the sleuth found one of the fa
miliar looking little kernels lying
on the threshold of an Italian res
taurant at E839 Front avenue.
Discovered! Going within, he
Canned Goods
PRIDE OF AMERICA
Sweet corn, IBc goods. .10c
Refuge* beans. 2 for 3. r >c
goods 2 for 25c
Tomatoes, | for 35c
goods 15c
Sweet wrinkle peas, reg
ular 16c 2 for 25c
REVERE BRAND
20c Lima beans 17e
20e Refugee beans 17c
20c extra Golden Wax
beans 17c
2">o extra lifted Karly
June peas 20c
20c extra Little Om
peas 17c
Revere brand sweet
wrinkle peas, 20c
goods 17c
Revere extra quality toma
toes, large tin. 20c
goods 17c
Revere brand canned
squash, 20c g00d5....17c
THE BPOKANE PRESS, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12
Mam or "Duff," the son of his old
New Salem foe and friend, JacK
Armstrong. The boy was charged
with murder. A witness on the
trial at Beardstown told how, by
moonlight he saw the boy strike
the blow which had killed the mur
dered man. But Lincoln, in the
cross-examination of this witness,
suddenly showed him an almanac
of the year of the murder —nnd not
of another year as a silly, wicked
story has tried to make it appear
—and by this almanac showed that
the moon had set long before the
hour in which tbe witness claimed
to have seen the boy strike the
blow. And so Duff Armstrong was
acquitted, and Lincoln would take
no fee from his old friend, Hannah'
Armstrong, except her thanks.
Another time he defended
Peachy Harrison, a grandson of old
Peter Cartwright, whom Lincoln
had beaten for congress. Harrison
was indicted for killing Greek Craf
ton, and the old -Methodist preach
er told how Crafton had said be
fore dying, "I want to say to my
slayer that 1 forgive him." With
such a dying declaration, as the
lawyers call it, Lincoln of course
made a great speech, and touched
the hearts of the jury with that
pity whtich he felt for all souls in
trouble. And -so the boy was set
free.
Tomorrow's article will tell of
the great debate; of the call to
duty; of championing the old cause
of Liberty; of the grapple with
Douglas; of a defeat that was a
victory, and of the rail candidate.
discovered a bag containing about
a half bushel of beans beneath the
counter in the kitchen.
The proprietor was not in, but
Nick I'onilka, the cook, was hur
ried to the police station, asserts
ing all the way that he knew notii*
ing of how the beans got thenftr
The police are conducting a still
hunt for the proprietor of the rsß>
taurant. ['
WOULDN'T LET WHITE
GIRL WED CHINK
NEW WESTMINSTER. B. iV.
Feb. 12—The intervention of t le
police prevented the marriage of a
Chinaman to a white girl, a Bin
Francisco woman named Lußl
Morris, who will be deported as
an undesirable alien. The bride
to-be. I.cc Barker, when he found
the girl In trouble, made no effort
to assist her.
The marriage license was issued
in Victoria, and the couple was on
a hunt for a clergyman who would
brave public opinion and press
censure by tying the knot.
ABRAHAM
LINCOLN
Souvenirs
Just received a large con
signment, 15c up to $10.00.
Honor his memory by deco
rating your home with one
of these beautiful souvenirs.
Keeth, Batley &Co.
The Art Dealers
717-719 SPRAGUE AVENUE
LOTS IN DEAUTIFUL
Spring Hill Addition
$275 to $400.
So.
J. W. OSBORNE
817 Rookery Building.
COAL
MAXWELL 93.
ROCK SPRINGS
BEAR CREEK
CANADA WEST
ACME and 1
WOOD BY aif.K-
i). McDonald
.2 Riverside Avenue.
GOOD BARGAINS
FOR SATURDAY SELLING
READ THE LIST BELOW CAREFULLY; YOU ARE SURE TO SEE SOMETHING YOU NEED AND
THE PRICES ARE MUCH LESS THAN YOU WOULD HAVE TO PAY FOR THE SAME QUALITY OF
MERCHANDISE ELSEWHERE.
Sale Men's Suits
$ 9.50
Ono lot of men's suits, all new styles and all sizes,
broken lots. These are all wool and comprise plain and
fancy cashmeres, cheviots, metlons and tweeds, etc.
Values to $20, on sale Saturday. $9.50
Sale of Boys' /fl
Wool Pants **VC
They come in dark patterns and fancy
stripes, all sizes; worth up to $1.00,
on sale Saturday 49c
QE\ f* Ladies' Waists O f*
I A A lot of ladies' waists in assorted pat- I A
l k terns, mohairs and flannels, all colors, k
well ma^e - all siz es; values up to $3.00;
on sale Saturday at, your choice,
SALE OF FINE MUSLIN UNDERWEAR
LOT 1
25c Garment
One lot ladies' and misses' fine
muslin garments; lot contains draw
ers, corset covers, chemise and
skirts; values to $1.00.
LADIES' AND MISES' SKIRTS
$1.00
One lot of ladies' and misses' skirts, plain and fancy
colors, well made; values up to $3.50
$2.95
One lot of ladies' fine dress skirts, odd lots and
broken sizes. Come in all new materials, plain and
fancy colors. Values up to $7.50. Saturday $2.95
LADIES' FINE TAFFETTA SILK WAISTS, SLIGHTLY DAMAGED *t»« m*\
%bl.tyij WATER ONLY -ALL SIZES; VALUES UP TO $7.50. ON SALE, $1.50 j)|so
SALE OF MEN'S
SHIRTS.
With or without
collars, light or
dark colors, all
sizes, worth to
$1.5$
SALE SHOES FOR WHOLE FAMILY
95c
a pair, (hie lot of youths' school
shoes, solid ; sizes ,S to 12; regular
$1.25. on sale tomorrow 95c
$1.27
Lot of boys' shoes, solid; sizes
l3Ms to 5' .; values to $2.00,
Saturday $1.27
$1.29
(hie lot of misses' school shoos,
in kid or box calf; values to $2.00,
all sizes.
4L THE BOSTON STORE -33
MEN'S UNDER
WEAR, 39c A
GARMENT.
Jersey ribbed or
fleece lined, all
sizes and colors;
regularly 65c and
75c.
MEN'S HATS
75c
in all colors, kinds, sizes;
worth up to $3.00.. Satur
day 75c
LOT 2 98c Each
Choice lot ladies' fine gowns,
skirts, drawers, chemises, corset
covers and combination suits.
These are nicely trimmed with lace
or embroidery and made of fine
quality muslins, nainsook and cam
brics. Values up to $4.00 each.
BOYS' SWEATERS,
75c
One lot of boys' V neck
sweaters, in white or
gray; worth $1.25, on sale
tomorrow 75c
$1.35
a pair. One lot of ladies' fine shoes,
all stylos and sizes; values to $2.50.
$1.89
a pair. One lot of ladise' tine dress
shoes, iv all new styles and sizes;
values to $3.50.
Men's Overcoats
$3.95
One lot of men's plain and fancy overcoats, heavy
wool meltons, extra good value, come in all sizes.
Values up to $12, to close out, at $3.95
SUITS $1.45
One lot of hoys' school suits, double
breasted style, dark colors, all sizes; reg
ularly worth $ , _\so, on sale
tomorrow $1.45
SALE OF LADIES' $ CHILDREN'S
HOSIERY AND UNDERWEAR
I2V2C pair for a lot of ladies' fast black, fleece lined
hose, worth 20c.
15c pair children's fast black, ribhed hose, all sizes;
regularly 25c.
22V2C pair ladies' and children's fine, all wool hose;
regularly .'Joe and 40c.
25c garment; one lot of ladies', children's and boys'
underwear, all styles and sizes; odd lots; values
to $1.00, choice 25c
MEN'S PANTS,
75c PAIR.
(lood everyday
working pants, all
sizes, broken lots;
worth up to $1.50,
on sale Saturday
at, a pair 75c
LOT 3
45c Each
Ladies' muslin drawers, corset
covers, gowns, chemises and skirts,
worth up to $1.50, Saturday
only, choice 45c
$2.29
a pair. One lot of men's solid work
shoes, in all leathers and styles;
values to $3.50.
$2.85
One lot of men's fine dress shoes,
in box calf, kid. patent leather aud
velour; broken lots, but all sizes;
values to $5.00.
m
BOYS' OVER
ALLS, 25c A
PAIR.
Boys' fancy
striped bib over
alls, all sizes;
worth 40c, on sale
Saturday 25c

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