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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, March 13, 1909, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1909-03-13/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE SPOKANE PRESS
I Published Every Evening Except Sunday
By the Spokane Newspaper Co.
» —-— ——• ,
f UNITED PRESS ASSOCIATION NEWS SERVICE
f Delivered by carrier, twenty-five cents per month, $3.00 per year.
m Stall, twenty-five cents per month, $1.25 six months, $2.00 per year.
rJb free copies.
TO MAIL SUBSCRIBERS—The date when your subscription expires
IS on the address label of each paper. When that date arrives,,if your
sob script ion has not again been paid In advance, your name is taken
from the list A change of date on the address label is a receipt.
J*. A M I —————— ! ~ 1
6t2 Front Avenue,
telephone Main 375.
Ftastolfice Box 4.
ALL MUST EAT FROM SAME DISH.
What is sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander.
What is good for a railroad is good for the brother in law
of a president. What is bad for the proprietor of tlie New
York World newspai>er is bad for the workman injured
by a railroad.
We are moved to these reflections by the outcry against
the powers of the federal court to "drag the defendants"
in a libel suit from Indianapolis or New York city to
Washington, D. C, for trial.
Maybe it is a bad thing.
But we have not heard so much about the terrible
powers of the federal courts, when the man dragged from
one district to another district happened to be the plaintiff
in a suit to recover compensation from some powerful cor
poration. It was all right for the rich corporation's rich
lawyers to drag the poor man from one place to another
place; from his local habitation and neighborhood to a
distant habitation and neighborhood. It was all right to
tire him out; to use up his resources, and to defeat the
Claim.which a theoretical interpretation of the law gives
to him.
That kind of thing has been going on for years. Tt has
gone on until damage suits have become almost obsolete.
It has gone on until the law in regard to accidents has
become a dead letter. It has gone on until it is cheaper
for the industrial corporation to kill than to be careful.
It has gone on until the burden of the death and wounds
•re transferred from the industry where the burdren be
longs to the thousands of wounded and to the widows and
orphans of the killed. And during all this time the in
justice of dragging a defendant from one jurisdiction to
•nother has not impressed itself on Joseph Pulitzer and
Delevan Smith.
But now the federal court has been asked to use its ex
traordinary powers to take the proprietors of a couple of
rich and powerful newspapers from their home town and
county-—from the little bailiwick where they have been
the Poo-Bahs; from the small neighborhood where they
have influenced courts and prosecuting officers, and they
are suddenly made defendants and are dragged to that
Eart of the country where it is alleged the federal court
as jurisdiction to punish their offending.
And suddenly they have <discovered that this is a*very
bed and very dangerous power to entrust to a federal
court.
Well, maybe it is. But what is sauce for the goose is
sauce for the gander.
Even at the risk of exposing a little harshness in the
workings of the haw and courts we would like to see a
more impersonal administration of their powers.
j AS USTENED BY - FRED <SeHAEXER • 2
I was a witness in court the other
day.
Not an expert witness, but an or
dinary, slob witness, who had to
testify for nothing.
It was -a case where there had
beed a difficulty. I hsd had my
nose broken, and a friend of mine
had had his eye put in mourning by
n husky hack driver.
The police called It a difficulty,
slthough, I sssure you, the hack
driver did Ii without the slightest
difficulty. '
He had attacked me and my
friend without provocation. What
he attacked us with was a wagon
spoke.
Wall, my friend I appeared as
witnesses agSiust him. One look at
OS was onoitgh to show that we had
been there when it happened. I
waa the nose witness and my friend
was the eye witness. Tbe spoke
spoke for Itself.
"This man. Judge, your honor," I
said, "tried to charge us double
fare."
"They looked double, judge," the
h*gl driver said.
"What yon mean," I said. "Is that
we saw double." Then I sddea,
"We paid you to ride in advance."
'•Well,*' he t-aidl. "I rode In ad
vance, didn't I?" '
"Sure you did," I said, "but you
made us ride in. addition."
"Then," said the Judge, ' you
should have paid him addition."
That's where we made our mis
take. Instead of paying him in ad
dition we paid him In money.
"I want to ask the defendaut a
nyfotaetteal guesUoa," 1 said.
"Motion overruled," said the
Judge. "He didn't give you a hypo
thetical punch In the nose."
The Judge finally said he would
fine the hackman the costs, so the
court got the money we had given
the hackman.
Now if he'd also given the court
the broken nose and the black eye
the court would have had all that
we had.
But this court wasn't hoggish.
Strange but True
"It's wonderful how perfect
strangers can locate one another at
times," said the policeman, who is
on duty at the depot.
"Hundreds of people come down
here to meet somebody arriving on
a train. They never have seen the
traveler and don't know what he or
. she looks like, and the traveler Is
In Ignorance of the appearance of
the person or persons to meet him.
But somehow or other the seeker
1 and the person sought nearly al
ways find each other. I've seen It
I work so often that I believe there
' Is some kind of a mysterious at
' traction that draws these people to
gether. ,
"Hardly a day passes without
some man telling me he expects to
meet somebody he never saw, and
1 watch them to-sec how they suc
ceed and invariably they do."
"Then," somebody asked, "when
a policeman or a detective comes to
the depot to catch a crook, and has
a description, why is It"——
But the cop declined to listen.
ON HIKE TO NEW YORK.
George R. Chaffee and Robert F.
Illina of Seattle, who are making
a walk from Seattle to the Atlan
tic seaboard, are in the city and
will remain here until Sunday or
Monday, when they will strike out
for Sandpolnt, making the dis
tance in two days. They are vol
untarily advertising the A V P ex
position while on route.
LUMBER TRADE DULL.
SEATTLE, March 13.—There Is
a strong probability that sawmills
of western Washington will either
close indefinitely or curtail opera
tions to local cargo shipping re
quirements within a few weeks.
Tho volume of retail yard orders
is far below, expectations.
Entered at Spokane,
Wash., as Second
Class Matter.
glill ANYllilNft
THE WHIRLIGIG OF LIFE.
A WORD FROM JOSH WISE.
"Th" friend
w h o'a alius
wantin' favors is
sawin' off th'
limb he sots on."
The shah of Persia has come to
it. He is trying to pawn his col
lection of curios. Whether this in
cludes the members of his harem la
not stated.
New York pair of twins goes to
Blackwells island as vags on their
DAILY SHORT STORY
THE ETERNAL FEMININE.
There was a time when a num
ber of the boys on the Cross Bar
ranch secretly pined to win the
heart and hand of Angelina
Rhodes, but it was different now.
Five years in college had given
her new ideas and new perspec
tives. So when she came home
richly and tastefully attired and
talked of lofty ideals there wasn't
a horse wrangler on the ranch but
what knew he could never measure
up to her expectations.
But Angelina was the boys' idol,
and they swore by Hornet's Knob,
whose bald peak looked like a
white sepulchre in the distance,
that they'd protect her and see
that she got the right man for a
husband.
Shortly after her return from
school young men from distant
towns and neighboring ranches
came to court Angelina, who sat
and talked to them on a rustic
bench under a tree. The embryo
lovers failed to -Impress her and
she longed to get rid of them. It
remained for Sandy Ferguson, one
of the cowpunchers, to offer a solu
tion to the difficulty.
"We all air fer you, Miss Ange
lina," remarked the sage, stroking
his grizzled beard, "and from our
preserver seats at the Boston Em
porium we kin see that the dudes
galavautin' 'round here ain't makln'
much of a hit with you, and I've
evolved an idee wharby you gits
rid of 'em you don't like, without
their knowln' you air in on the
play."
"Oh. Sandy," said Angelina, "I
wish you could help me."
"Well, here's my plan. While you
air sittin' under the tree with one
of them dudes that hain't got sense
enough to take a hint and light
out, all you have o do Is to put
your hand to your head and we'll
do the rest."
Angelina clapped her hands glee
fully and fell in with the plan sug
gested.
The next day Horace Wild, a
persistent and objectionable suitor,
called, and when the girl raised her
hand to her head the boys at the
Boston Emporium unburdened
themselves of blood-curdling yells
and, mounltng their horses, gallop
ed madly down street. Whizz went
a lariat, and Horace Wild found
himself bounding airily across the
prairie and doing his utmost to
keep on his feet. After practically
all the breath in his body was Jolt
ed out of him, the young man was
tossed on his horse and sent home.
Sandy Ferguson's scheme was a
great success, and in three days
several other undesirable suitors
decided io give up Angelina rather
than risk having their limbs brok
en by a crowd of exuberant cow
boys. Then came Lieutenant James
Crewes from the fort. He had met
the girl at a military dance and
lost his heart. The lieutenant was
till and fine looking, and the boys
ajt the Boston Emporium chuckled
merrily at the prospect of the fun
in store for them.
Angelina in a new gown was a
picture of feminine loveliness as
she and the handsome officer stroll
ed to the rustic bench, while the
boys watched closely from a dis
tance.
"Thar's the signal," exclaimed
Sandy as he saw Angelina's hand
rising slowly to her head and the
boys were in their saddles imme
diately. In less time than It takerf
to tell It a lariat flashed over the
head of the neatly groomed officer
and he found himself leaving his
fair companion In a most abrupt
and undignified manner. Cowboys'
were whooping and bsandishlng
glittering weapons and shining sol- j
dier buttons were in the air. It
was great sport for the ranchers
aud they keyt the lieutenant on
39th birthday. Troubles never come
singly.
Indiana man sends pair of sox to
Taft. .Is that an insinuation that
Big Bill is going to have trouble
filling Teddy's shoes?
Tacoma, Wash., police brutally
arrest a man who made it a rule
to steal one thing a day. That's
the reward that plodding merit
gets.
More, than 10,000 New England
rubber mill operatives have return
ed to work. They will now be busy
for a stretch.
Rats are going out, they say at
the hairdressers. And just as we'd
gotten used to seeing them on the
dresser. Oh, well—
the jump until he was almost ex
hausted. Finally strong hands
placed him on his horse and sent
him galloping back to headquar
ters.
But when the ranchers returned
they found the beautiful Angelina
highly indignant. "I didn't want
you to do that, boys," she said,
angrily stamping her lltth? foot.
"He was the nicest man that had
been here, and I was beginning to
like him." S
The boys looked at each other in
open-mouthed amazement. "Why,
Miss Angelina," observed t Samly,
apologetically, "we only tobeyed
your signal;" »s " «
"Oh, I knoW, but when jC put my
hand to my head I merely*/wanted
to see if my hat was on straight."
* '.k\ .
LITTLE BOY CRUBHEOi " i
NORTH POWDER, March
13. —Werner Lubbes, ag&seveu,
was crushed to death yesterday by
a wagon In front of his home. A
younger brother was the only wit
ness. The horses were alone- when
the boy brightened them.
Water Is Now-
Being Put Over
Glenwood Park
ON THE NORTH HILL
FOR a short time you can buy
lots in Glenwood Park, with
water I mains in front of them, for:
bifde Lots $ 75.00
Ccjrner Lots.... 100.00
$ 11.00 Cash; $5.00 per Month
See Us at Once
G. A. Yancey & Co.
SPOKANE, WASHINGTON
Phone Main 1422 618 Riverside Aye.
MR. 4SKYJACK, FROM MARS
MS VISITS THE EARTH. AS A SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT AND
MAKES WIRELESS OBSERVATIONS IN HIS NOTEBOOK
; pass/ah? r##ouw Pt/cAc f/rwP of x*u
vcfsrsais G*owm. SAW JLA»C* M<9fC*'\
FOL fH&tlWf <S£COMJ>
JFAIQOS OF &9/rr//-OftOrSV
4FFSCT/OM, CAUSFD OF
BRUTf, /9FFFX W/Y/OY £rtW»~J3J!/M?s
BfCrt/tf FHST F#/£*i*s. ;
"The World is So Full of a Number of Things,
That I Think We Should All be as Happy as Kings"
Here is a variation of the advertisement game which would be nice
to try some evening when there's a little crowd together:
Cut faces from well known men and women in the magazines—ac
tors, writers, musicians, government people and the like, and nt them
with bodies cut from other pictures. Finally disguise them still more
completely with hats and other accessories from the fashion depart
ment of magazines. Paste each of these compound celebrities on 25
or more cards. Circulate them among your friends, and the one guess
ing the most faces may receive a prize.
G. A. R. ACTS UNDER
INDIGENT FUND LAW
J. B. Wyman post, No. 41, O. A.
R,, of Rockford, has notified the
county commissioners that it will
undertake the relief of indigent
soldiers hereafter, under the law
of 1907, which will make a portion
of the county Indigent soldier fund
available. The post reports that
it has expended hundreds ofsjdol
lars for the relief of indigent sol
diers lv the last 18 months.
NEW APPOINTEES APPROVED.
The county commissioners have
approved the appointment of Rolla
Hubbard, J. A. Anderson and W.
L. Jackson as special deputies in
the countjj treasurer's office during
the rush season at $90 per month.
The appointment of w. W. Jessup
as clerk In Judge Hlnkle's court at
a salary of $100 per month was
also approved.
TEXAS RACES KILLED.
AUSTIN, Texas, March
Governor Campbell has signed
the anti-race track bill. It becomes
effective within 90 days.
. r
TO SIGN UP JEFF.
NEW YORK, March 13.—Hugn
Mcintosh, promoter of the John
son-Burns fight at Sydney, la here
trying to make arrangements for a
fight between Johnson and Jeff
ries. Mcintosh says Johnson Is
unpopular In Australia.
FIREMEN FIND CHANCE
TO GET BLOWN UP
While making a tour of Inspec
tion through the business district
Captain Lindsley of No. 5 nre sta
tion found a quantity of dynamite
caps in the store of MoOowan Bros,
at Wall and Post street. The mat
ter was reported to Chief A. M. My
ers, who brought the matter to the
attention of the board of fire com
missioners.
. As a result the board served no
tice on tbe hardware firm to re
move the explosives forthwith un
der penalty of arrest. The caps
were kept in a quantity prohibited
by ordinance and the fire depart
ment feared that in event of a fire
great .damage and loss of life would
result through the presence of the
explosives.
The average boy of 10 or 12 years
travels 20 miles in doing his play
ing on Saturdays.
Victor '0'
$19.60
with 6 record*.
$3.60 DOWN—SI.OO PER
WEEK.
Don't go music hungry
when so small a sum will
give you the greatest enter
tainer in the world.
The new model "O" has
flower horn, tapering hollow
arm, mahogany case, and
plays sll size records. $19.60
buys instrument complete
with six records.
Come in and hear them
play snd sing or phone 4672
and have a machine sent out.
Corner Sprague and Post.
G. A. HEIDINGER, Manager.
Chlckerlng Piano Dealers.
COAL
Try our range coal—a mix
ture of egg and nut—specially
classified for range purposes.
It's good. It's economical.
Phone Maxwell 380 for price.
Washington Coal Co.
We furnish children's caskets $5.00
Adults' caskets $25.00
Three hacks, grave, fc7lS
hearse aud casket «P / 3
New England Undertaking Co.,
216-218 Wall St. Free ambulance.
BACK INTO SHAPE
Parisian Dye Works
Has no branch offices nor
agents. Office 605 First Aye
Phone 2137. L. A. Lehmsnn
I
We cordlnally invite th-; r.coovnts of Inr'ivldusls, firm* and
corporations, promisimj satijf? ctory service in addition to
undoubted security.
Deposoltory of United Ht'atos, State of VY»«l.)rVfltcn, County
of Spokane, City of Spsksr.f,
Edwin T. Coman. tfrMiMoet. C. g, Mc r* room. Cashlejfc
Thos. H. Brewer. \.'ice p r 1 m Hi ticy, Vita Pro*.
INTEREST .PAID.QNfcIM?
$1.00
Per Week
the opportunity to secure a good,
serviceable Trunk, Valise or Dress
suit Case at our special sale will
be sorry when she hoars ot the
bargains she has missed. Trunks
for traveling purposes. Durable,
metal-bound and warranted to
wear well in long service. Prices
away below what they should be|
GARLAND, McPARLIN A CO.
819 RIVERSIDE AVENUE
MODEL
TWO STORES
726 Riverside 3 Post St
WKKIRSHAoi St BAXTER
CAPITAi r$ H '-'■'{ ! : !.250.000.00
The Union
Trust Co
mpany of
Spokane is
completing Its office ar
rangements, installing
■ new fixtures and equip
ping ita banking rooms
preparatory to opening ita
savings department on
next Monday, March 15th.
SAVINGS !
ACCOUNTS
of one dollar and upward
will be received.
Deposits, made between
now and April sth will
draw Interest from April
Ist.
Union Trust
Company
OF SPOKANE
Ths Msrble Bank Bldg.
THE EXCHANGE
NATIONAL Bank
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS
$1,250,000.00,
OFFICERS
Edwin T. Comsn, President
Thos. H. Brewer, V. Pres.
C. E. Mcßroom, Cashier
E. N. Scale, Asst. Caahhtr. 1
The Isrge capital, coupled
with conservative manage
ment, appesls to those seek
ing absolute security. A fully
equipped eavlngs department
offers fair interest for the
wsge esrner.
THE MISS WHO MISSES

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