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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, March 16, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1909-03-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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REGISTRATION FOR THE PRIMARY
MAXES YOU A DELEGATE IN THE
COMING ELECTION CONVENTION
wWTED PRESS ASSOCIATION SERVICE
GRAND JURY CALLS
HEAD G. N. OFFICIALS
Orders All Accounts Relating to Gordon
Affair Brought Into Court.
W. R. Begg, general counsel; E.
6awyer, treasurer, and John Q.
Drew, auditor, Oreat Northern offi
cials at the company's general of
fices in St. Paul, have been person
ally served with subpoenas to ap
pear before tbe Spokane county
grand Jury under penalty of being
punished for contempt of court for
a violation of the order, if they do
violate and come within jurisdic
tion of the Spokane court.
A special telegram from St. Paul
announced that service was secur
ed on the Great Northern officials
by Deputy Sheriff S. D. Doak of
Spokane, who went to St. Paul with
the subpoenas.
Service was not secured on Louis
W. Hill, president of the Great
Northern, who Is In Ix>s Angeles. A
deputy sheriff will keep on the
trail of Hill and he will be given an
opportunity to obey or refuse to
comply with an order of court com
manding his appearance before the
grand jury.
L. C. Oilman, the company's
Washington counsel, who is soon to
become connected with headquar
ters staff at St. Paul, voluntarily
accepted grand jury witness service
a few days ago and is expected to
Ko before the grand Jury today or
tomorrow.
The Great Northern officials at
)lt. Paul have been asked to ap
pear on or before March 25 and
bring with them all of the papers
relating to the settlement of the
ease In the federal court at Spo
kane in which antes S. Sparrow
was plaintiff and the Great North
ern defendant.
ThW is the case In which Judge
M. J. Gordon, former Great North
ern counsel, is accused of embez
aling $9200. The grand jury asks
to see the drafts, vouchers, letters,
telegrams and all papers relating to
the settlement in the Sparrow case,
in which the company paid twice
the agreed amount of the settle
ment, $9200. There are 13 of these
documents in all that the grand
Jury calls upon the Great Northern
officials to produce.
The first Sparrow draft for $9200
was drawn by Judge Gordon and
bore the date of May 27, 1808; the
second for the same amount, signed
by L. C. Oilman, bore the date of
August 31, 1908. All Of these pa
pers were submitted at the investi
gation of the state bar committee.
In addition to the papers in the
Sparrow case the Spokane county
grand jury has asked that all rec
ords and files in the Great Northern
office at St. Paul relating to any
shortage by Judge Gordon be pro
duced, with date and nature of the
transaction. Also the record of the
auditor of the road, showing the
account of Judge Gordon and the
detailed shortage, if any, of Judge
Gordon with the company.
The grand jury subpoenas served
on the Great Northern officials are
signed by Judge Huneke, County
Clerk Atkinson or one of his depu
ties and Foreman Davis of the
grand jury.
At the end of the subpoenas is a
statement to this effect signed by
F. K. Mcllroom, chairman of the
board of county commissioner:!:
SCANDINAVIANS NAME
FASSETT AND PRATT
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE EN
DORSES CHOICES FOR
MAYOR AND COUNCIL TO BE
SUBMITTED TO ENTIRE
CLUB TONIGHT.
j The executive committee of the
Scandinavian republican club In Its
session last night Indorsed both
C. M. Fassett, republican, aud N.
S. Pratt, democrat, for the mayor
alty, after listening to the answers
made by four candidates on the
matter of franchises, a restricted
district and the saloon problems.
Those who appeared before tbe
committee were N. S. Pratt, J.
Grant Hinkle, C. M. Fassett and
John F. Sanders. The answers of
Mr. Pratt and Mr. Fassett are re
ported to have ben along the
same llnet* and proved satisfactory
to tbeiortanisation, while the rad
ical positions of Hinkle and San
ders on tbe saloon question was
not generally favored. The vote
for Pratt was uuanlnioua, while
the vote for Fassett was split,
Hinkle showing some sticugtn.
"The county commissioners of
Spokane county hereby guarantee
to each of the foregoing witnesses
their traveling expenses from the
place of service to Spokane, Wash
ington, and their traveling expenses
to their place of residence."
The grand jury continued its in
vestigations this morning without
further interruption. i
Another batch of subpoenas for
local witnesses were issued this af
ternoon, and the indications are be
ginning to show a warming up in
the inquiry.
The matter of taking records of
evidence or of further proceedings
as to contempt against Prosecutor
Pugh did not come up in court.
• UNCLE JOE" VERY
WRATHY NOW
WASHINGTON. March 16.—Can
non let out a little steam today
when he met Champ Clark In the
white house after a conference with
Taft. Clark asked Cannon how he
liked yesterday's proceedings. Can
non shoow his fist in Clark's face,
saying:
"The house is virile because ff
can operate by the will of the ma
jority. This talk about the speaker
being a czar is tommy rot. What
they attempted to do was to create
a committee of 15 czars, dominated
by Champ Clark and La Follette.
La Follette is a fake."
Cannon then dashed away.
BURIED ALIVE BUT
DOESN'T MIND IT
MAJOVE. Cal., March 16.—After
being buried alive four days, John
Marconi is working today as a
miner on a Los Angeles aqueduct.
A timber in a tunnel at Pinto, 10
miles north of here, collapsed Mon
day of last week. Marconi's escape
was cut off by a bank of sand 30
feet thick. A two inch pipe was
driven through the sand to admit
air and Friday morning Marconi
was rescued.
KICKED GREEKS
OUT OF PICTURE
OGDEN. Utah, March 16—A
bloody riot Involving scores of
Americans and Greek laborers, re
sulted today when the Greek at
tempted to join a group of Ameri
can structural iron workers who
were having their pictures taken.
Thirty were Injured before the po
lice interferred.
ABRAHAM FOR GOVERNOR.
SALEM. Ore., March 16 — Sena
tor Abraham of Douglas today an
swered many inquiries by admit
ting the truth of the report that he
is a candidate for governor next
year. Abraham says he under
stands Benson will be a candidate
for re-election as secretary of
state.
The committee also took up the
matter of indorsing councilmen
and attempted to name men on
both the democratic and repub
lican tickets, although this action
was not carriM through the entire
program. Following are the in
dorsements:
First ward, first term, Leonard
Fuuk, democrat, and C. Twitchell,
republican; second term, Carl
Tuerke, democrat.
Second ward, John Gray and
Fred Buldwln.
Third ward. \V. R. Cooley and
Jacob Schiller.
Fourth ward, Louis Martin and
Charles W. Mohr.
Fifth ward, Peter Nelson.
The action of the executive com
mittee will be brought before the
entire club this evening at a meet
ing at 8 In Judge Stocker's court
room at the courthouse, to be rati
fied. No apprehension is felt that
any of the recommendations of the
executive committee will be re
jected.
THE SPOKANE PRESS
AMENDMENT
PETITIONS
SIGNED
Liberal Direct Government
Provisions Go to .
Council.
The initiative and referendum
amendment petition will be pre
sented to the city council tonight.
This is a victory for Thomas Ma
loney and H. E. Schubert of tbe
legislative committee of the cen
tral union and the Referendum
league. Enough names are now en
rolled to compel the city council to
submit the amendment to a popular
vote.
The city at present has a charter
amendment providing for the initia
tive and referendum but makes the
number of signers equal to 35 per
cent of the total vote cast at the
preceding election. This percent
age renders the amendment inoper
ative.
The proposed amendment is iden
tical with that now inforce in the
city of Seattle. The referendum re
quires 8 per cent petitions; initia
tive 10; special election, 20 per
cent.
Members of the referendum
league and advocates of the refer
endum generally are jubilant over
their success attained thus far in
placing an effective initiative and
referendum amendment in the city
charter.
The recall petition having been
circulated for a less period than the
initiative and referendum is not yet
ready to be presented to the city
council, but it is expected to be by
the next meeting.
Thomas Maloney, as chairman of
Oie legislative committee of thu
central labor union, will present
the petitions.
SANDERS ALSO
STANDS ALONE
SAYS HE HAS NOT SOLICITED
FEDERATED CLUBS INDORSE
MENT AND DOESN'T ACCORD
WITH THEIR POLICY.
John F. Sanders, candidate for
mayor of the Uw Enforcement
league, wants none of the Indorse
ment of the Federated clubs.
"It Is the matter of the smallest
moment whether 1 receive the In
dorsement of the club or not" stat
ed Mr. Sanders this morning. "I
did not go before the club to secure
an Indorsement but merely on the
Invitation of that body that 1 ap
pear and state my position.
"The Law Enforcement league
was responsible In a large measure
for the questions put to the candi
dates, but the question of the sa
loons and the restritced district
are no In accord with the league s
policy and I would not consider
myself bound by the indorsement
any more thau Mr. Hinkle would.
I am a prohibitionist and am
against the saloon at all stages.
"I would deeply regret if my en
trance into the race would spit the
vote in a manner to elect the less
desirable man for the mayoralty,
as has been suggested might be the
case. We want reform along a cer
tain line and do not stand for tem
porizing. As a matter of fact the
use of my name as a candidate ts
incidental to the issues of the Law
Enforcement league. I have sim
ply been named as a man who fa
vors the measures of the league,
rather than the leader of the
move."
GREAT STRIKE
CRIPPLES PARIS
PARIS, March 16.—The great
telegraph strike is spreading rapid
ly throughout this city, practically
Stopping all communication today
between ParU aud German aud
Italian cities. All messages are
four to six hours late. Cable serv
ice to New York Is slow.
Weather— Probsbly fair tonlftrt and Wednesday; slightly warmer.
SPOKANE, WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, MARCH 16, 1909
- ■
WHOM WIRELESS JOINS TOGETHER
LET NO MAN PUT ASUNDER
Special Oomqwdnot to *fee feast
NEW YORK, March 16.—
"My bonnie Ilea over the ocean,
My bonnie Ilea.over the sea;
But that doesn't make any differ
ence, .>'••
. He talks every morning to me."
Behold the most up to date sweet
heart the world has ever seen,
Anna Nevlns* of New York.
She's the only wireless operator
In the world of her sex, and her sta
tion is the United Wireless coop on
the roof of the Waldorf hotel.
| Miss Nevins won't say she loves
a certain young man who is a wire
less operator on the sbips of the
Hamburg-American line—that is,
she wouldn't tell the correspondent
so.
"Yes, I know the young man,"
she says. "He is out on the Oceania
now. When he's in town I see him
often," she admitted. "But almost
every day I .hear from him," she
said with a smile, pointing to the
wireless apparatus.
And very often he hears froth
her. ' ' t
You know how a girl feels when
she just must, must see or hear a
certain young man, one certain
"Jacky boy."
Well, Miss Nevins must feel that
way sometimes, for, from up In her
tower, above busy New York; over
the theaters and the skyscrapers,
topping Wall street, topping Har
lem, crossing the East river, cross
ing the Hudson, in vast circling
waves, goes her silent cry through
the air:
"Jack! Jack!"
And some operator on a majestic
liner, far out at sea, catches the cry
and sends it, in relay, into the air.
In midocean, perhaps, another oper
ator catches it.
And at last "Jack" hears it and
all the operators on all the liners
within hundreds of miles, who
know about "Jack" and Anna, wait
to hear his answer. Back it comes,
bounding hundreds of miles, who
know about "Jack" and Anna, wait
to hear his answer. Back it comes,
bounding hundreds of miles, from
TO PROSECUTOR PUGH
Probably but a small proportion of tho public actualy real
izes thst over in the Spokane county courthouse Prosecuting
Attorney Fred C. Pugh is fighting his way along the thorny
path that leads into the Heney and Folk class of protectors
of the commonwealth.
No prosecutor has had a more determined or formidable
formation to combat than Pugh is facing slone and undaunted
today. Every citizen st sll familiar with this state's political
history knows that the matter of alleged shortage in the pro
fessional relations of an employe ia merely incidental to the
grand jury inquiry.
Determination of that particular point is not what the
Washington State Bar assoclstion desired accomplished in re
questing -a grand jury.
It was not the motive that actuated the bar commission's
Isbors and final conclusions.
Back of It all, whether developed in this investigation or
not is the mooted question of public service manipulation and
political control of this state.
Final determination of that is what the public expects of
any inquiry worth the expense snd effort.
The Press believes that no man understands this more thor
oughly or accepts it more fully than Prosecutor Pugh.
From a judicial standpoint the matter of method of taking
testimony may be of vital importance, but it can be no reflec
tion on the court to say that public sentiment will accord
with that of the grand jury in requiring that a full and exact
record be preserved of every matter that may throw light on
the subjects under investigation.
A court must sit impartially between the opposing forces
in every sction snd the responsibility for keeping judicial pro
ceedings unclogged by error weighs heavier on him than any
man can appreciate who haa not occupied the same position.
But it is a safe and fair assumption that a statutory provis
ion which compels a court to prevent the preservation of evi
dence In a manner deemed vital by tho grand jury and pub
lic prooecutor to the furtherance of Justice is a subject of
public distrust.
Prosecutor Pugh may ley himself liable to technical con
tempt in his opposition to such a barrier, but he will not be
penalized on that charge before the bar of public opinion.
COFFEE TAX ABANDONED
Advance Schedule of New
Revision Bill Before
Congress.
WASHINGTON,' D. C, March 1«.
—The Payne tariff bill, which will
be introduced in congres late to
day or tomorrow, is said positively
to contain the following:
No tax on coffee.
Lumber reduced from |2 to ft
per 1000 feet.
Free hides, lower schedules on
hsoes aud leather goods.
Steel materially reduced.
Duties on sugar uudlsturbed.
Concessions granted Cuba and
to Philippines.
Wool schedule to be aimed at
the amount of scoured wool In
fleece, permitting cheaper grades
MISS ANNA NEVINS AT HER INSTRUMENT IN THE COOP ON
TOP OP THE WALDORF.
ship to ship, relayed, perhaps, in
two or three different languages:
"O. K. Anna.Jack."
And in a little coop on the upper
deck of the Oceania an operator
smiles; and in other little coops on
liners In ntidooean, other operators
smile In the night. It is still day
light In New York, and in a little
coop on top of the Waldorf hotel
Miss Anna Nevlns smiles.
"Ply, little bird, with the mes
sage of my love," the poets used to
sing.
Nevins, the twentieth cen
of wool to get in at less duty.
Woolens are slightly reduced.
Iron ore is reduced.
The bill will specify duties for
articles made dutiable by the
treasury and court decisions since
the passage of the Dingley law. A
maximum and minimum tariff will
be applied on some articles and
new classifications made to cor
rect errors of phraseology in the
construction of the Dingley bill.
Representative Payne of New
York has decided not to introduce
his tariff bill until after the ap
pointment of a new republican
member of the ways and means
committee to fill a vacancy.
KAi.K.M. Ore. March 16—Be
sides allowing themselves salaries
and mileage and appointing a con
ference committee on normal
schcols, the bouse did little this
a**- —
tury sweetheart, has this old game
beaten to death.
P. S.—With apologies:
Five years later —Wife, by wire
less: Jack, where were you last
night?
ack, at Madrid, Spain: I went to
bed early, dear.
Wife, humming to herself:
"My bonnie lies over the ocean.
My bonnie lies over the sea;
It's a deuce of a long way for lying,
But wait till he comes back to
me!"
DECLARE PARTY
TO REGISTER
CITY CLERK HEARS THAT RE
CENT LEGISLATURE PASSED
LAW TO PUT VOTERB ON
RECORD IN ADVANCE.
The repotred action of the legis
lature at the last session requiring
that every voter shall designate his
party affiliation at the time he reg
isters has been called to the atten
tion of City Clerk Fleming, who
wired the secretary of state this
morning for a copy of the law in or
der that he may see whether it will
affect the present registration.
As he understands it, Mr. Flem
ing states, the bill carried an emer
gency clause. The general opinion
aroun dthe city hall is that If this
provision appears in the bill it will
not be held constitutional. Mean
while the registration is going on
merrily.
SENATE ADJOURNS
UNTIL FRIDAY
WASHINGTON, D. C, March 16.
—Senate afternoon adjourned un
til Friday after confirming 10 ap
pointments, including the nomina
tion of John C. Young, former pri
vate secretary of Senator liourne,
as postmaster at Portland.
Thomas J. O'Brien will remain
ambassador to Japan, according to
the statement of Senator Smith of
Michigan, after a conference with
Taft today.
DISCOVER WHERE
FASSETT BOLTED
My digging Into the records,
those interested have recaled the
fact that In 1903 C. M. Fassett
bolted the regular republican muni
cipal ticket and ran as the candi
date for the council from the Third
ward for the Municipal league, a
body of men who were not In favor
with the republican policy.
W. H. Acuff was the candidate
for mayor on tho same ticket and
wag also defeated. Mr. Fassett ran
against .lames H. Boyd, republican,
K. C. Dillingham, democrat, and
Charles Montague. When the votes
were counted Boyd won by a vote
jof sr»s to M 8 for Dillingham. Mr.
Fassett ran thud with 20v votes.
WITHOUT
FEAR OR
FAVO R
SEVENTH YEAR, No. 111. 25 CENTS PER MONTH
COUNCIL MEETS THREE
NITS IN SUCCESSION
Takes Emergency Action in Order to Submit
Charter Revision This Election.
Referendum advocates owe
a vote of thanks to Council
men Dalke and Mohr. The
change of heart they expe
rienced when they saw the
state law coming their way is
the strongest argument possi
ble for direct rule.
The city council will meet three
consecutive nights this week, begin
ning tonight, for the purpose of
acting on proposed charter amend
ments and also a couple of private
amendments which will be offered
tonight.
One of these will be introduced
by President Lambert and will be a
substitute for the one appointing
the city engineer on the board of
public works. The Lambert amend
ment deals principally with the
powers of the mayor and confers on
him the "hiring and firing" power
in relation to the board of public
works, city engineer, corporation
counsel and chief of police, and also
with the police and Are depart
ments. It merely strikes the city
engineer feature from the amend
ment proposed by the charter re
vision committee.
The result will be that the voters
will have two conflicting amend
ments to pass upon and this may
muddle up tbe whole program. The
council has had a change of heart
and practically all of the members
have decided to report out the
amendments of the charter revis
ion committee. Councilman Dalke
stated that he was as much oppos
ed as ever to the amendment deal
ing with the city engineer but
would vote for the amendment in
the council, explaining his vote by
saying that he would work against
the measure but simply voted In
view of the fact that the petitions
will be signed up and the council
may as well get In line and save
the charter revision committee add
ed work. Councilman Mohr took
the same position some time ago.
The amendment providing for
nonpartisan municipal elections
will also be proposed In the coun
cil tonight. This Is included in the
amendments now being circulated
for signers. The council intends to
act favorably on this proposition.
It Is to pass out the amendments
TAFT GALLS FOR QUICK
AND CAREFUL REVISION
WASHINGTON, March If.—Taf
today sent congress his specia
message calling for readjustmen'
and revision of the tariff. He says
"I convened congress in extri
session to enable it to give immed>
ate consideration to revision of th«
Dingley tariff act. The prospect o:
a change in rates in import dutiet
always causes suspension and hal
In business because of uncertaintj
as to changes to be made and theii
effects. Therefore it is of the high
est importance that the new btll b«
agreed upon and passed with at
much speed as possible, consisted
with its thorough consideration."
The president points out thai
"conditions affecting production
manufacturers and business gener
ally have so changed In the last 11
years as to require readjustment
and revision ot import dudes im
posed by that act. More than thii
the present act, with other sourcet
of revenue, does not furnish in
come enough to pay authorized ex
penditures. By uly 1 the excess 01
LAW IN CASE
There are but two sections of
the Washington code relating to
giand juries that touch on the
question of taking evidence or
minutes of the proceedings. The
first section reads:
"And ths grand jury may sp
point one of their number clerk to
keep a minute of the proceedings."
—Second Ballanger's Code, Sec.
6810, psge 1880.
"But In case of sn Indictment
not found "a true bill" against a
person not so hold, the same, to
gether with the minutes of the evi
dence in relation thereto must bo
destroyed by ths grand jury."—
Scond Railenger'e Code, Sec. 6829,
page 1884.
ONE CENT
that the three consecutive meeting*
will be called. Under the charter
the amendments must be proposed
at one meeting and He over one
meeting before tbey can Anally be
acted upon. Under this program
the matter can be closed Thursday;
evening.
The charter revisionists will taka
no chance with the council. R. la
singer stated this morning that no
matter what action the council took
in regard to the matter the peti
tions now out will be kept in circu
lation and when filled will be filed]
with the council.
TO ENJOIN RECALL
ELECTION
LOS ANGELES, March 16.—Suit
will probably be filed this after
noon enjoining the city clerk and
other municipal officials from hav
ing a ballot printed for a recall
election .March 26, when an effort
will be made to oust Mayor Steph
ens, just appointed, and elect
George Alexander.
The suit, which will be filed by
the republican organization, will be
based upon the ground that a re
cal was invoked against former
Mayor Harper and that since Har
vey resigned there is no mayor to
recall; that Stephens be allowed
to serve Harper's term, which ex
pires Jan. 1, next year. . {
GRAND JURY GOES
TO COUNTY JAIL ..
The grand jury this afternon la
investigating the county jail, one
of the duties prescribed for It by
statute. Tbe jury is expected to
inquire in county adminlstratioa
affairs generally.
UNFURL FASSETT BANNER.
A Fassett banner will be display
ed across Riverside avenue within
the next day or two, according to
Harry Rhodes, manager of the Fas
sett campaign. The banner will be
across the street between the Zteg
ler block and the Rookery.
expenses over receipts for the cur
rent fiscal year equals $100,000,000.
"The successful party at the last
election pledged revision of the tar
iff. The country and business com
. munity especially expects it. For
I these reasons I deemed the present
.to be an extraordinary occasion
within the meaning of the constltu-
J tion justifying and requiring my
. calling an extra session. In my in
| augural address I stated in a sum
: mary way the principles upon
which, in my judgment, revision ot
the tariff should proceed and indi
cated at least one new source of
revenue which might be properly
resorted to to avoid future deficit.
"It is unnecessary for me to re
peat what was said then. I venture
to suggest that vital business inter
ests require the attention of con
gress and that this session be
chiefly devoted to consideration of
' the new tariff bill. The less time
, given other subjects for legislation
| this session the better for the coun
try."
These are the provisions of the
code on which Judge Huneke ha*
entered his instruction forbidding
the prosecuting attorney or his)
deputies taking any shorthand
notes of the evidence for the use
of the state's attorney. They may
make notest in longhand, and the
grand jury clerk may take it la
shorthand. If he can.
The contention of the attorney*
for Judge Qcrdon was that as the
code did not provide for the taking;
of shorthand notes of the evidence
by the prosecutor It was against
such practice because of its failure
to make specific prlvlslon for It.
Judge Huneke upheld this con«

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