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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, April 09, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1909-04-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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GOING TO MOVE?
Phone your new address to Main 375 and The
Preae will move right along with you.,
UNITED PRESS ASSOCIATION SERVICE
JUDGE HUNEKE DISMISSES GRAND JURY CONTEMPT CHARGE
PROSECUTOR WILL AGAIN
SEEK SUPREME COURT
Judge Sullivan, His Brother and N. E. Nuzum
Violated Secrecy, but Court Rules In
tent to Defeat Justice Must
be Proved.
In the opinion of one of
the lawyers who heard
Judge Huneke's findings In
the contempt case today,
the defendants were "con
victed of the facts but ac
quitted on the pleadings."
In passing on the proceedings
for contempt of court instituted by
the grand jury against Judge E. H.
Sullivan, N. E. Nuzum and P. C.
Sullvan, Judge W. A. Huneke to
day decide dthat the defendants
had violated the secrecy properly
enjoined upon all witnesses before
the grand jury but that to be held
for etMtem.pt it is necessary for
the state to show that the defend
ants In thus revealing their testi
mony before the grand jury direct
ly or Indirectly aided in defeating
the administration of Justice. The
court discharged the defendants.
The opinion holds with the state
on the question of the secrecy of
the grand Jury but removes the
effectiveness of the state's conten
tion by making It obligatory on
the state to show that a grand jury
witness, to be punished for con
tempt for divulging bis testimony
within the grand Jury room, must
have a malicious intent to aid In
defeating justice.
At the conclusion of the reading
of Judge Hnneke's opinion, Deputy
Prosecutor Don F. Kizer, who con
ducted the proceedings on behalf
of the state, gave notice of an ap
peal to the supreme court.
Prosecuting Attorney - Fred C.
Pugh was not present in court dur
ing the reading of tho opinion,
neither did be take part in the ar
gument of tho contempt preced
ing* before the court.
The opinion of Judge Uuneke is
PARTY TAKES
UP CITT EIGHT
OMO'S CAMPAIGN HEADQUAR
TERS WILL BE REPUBLICAN
CENTRAL POINT IN REGULAR
ELECTION FOR MAYOR.
J. T. Omo has closed bis primary
campaign headquarters and will
make bis fight for mayor from the
regular republican headquarters,
which are expected to be ostablish
ed MomTay. A. meeting of the re
puhlican city central committee is
to be called and tbe campaign car
ried out on straight republican
linos. Omo has no fear but tbat
the party organization will be for
him as the regularly selected
nominee, and be llgures on plenty
of democratic and independent*
friends, also.
There are no noticeable indica
tions of a party revolt, although a
strong effort will be made to stam
pede the organization to Pratt on
•the democratic ticket. Pratt at
least began tbe race as a demo
crat, emphasizing a public state
ment to that effect, but the plan Is
to switch this to a "nonpartisan"
basis In order to attract republican
votes. "Pratt-Republiean" clubs
are even talked of, but tbe old
timers are not greatly excited
over tlhs. They are under the im
pression that the proper term is
"Itevlew."
Omo declnres that he spent less
than $500 ln his nrlmary campaign
and that he has made no promises
farther than a square deal to work-
Infmen.
SHUBERTS TACKLE
$10,000,000 FIGHT
(By United Press)
NEW YORK, April 9 —The step
taken by the Rhuherts in with
drawing from tho Theatrical Man
agers' association Is believed here
to bo an opening gun of a war
which they have declared against
an organization owning 14 thea
ters In New York aud backed by
men whose aggregate wealth is es
timated at $10,000,000.
Shnbert and Max Anderson of
the Bhubert company withdrew
from the association, alleging they
had received unfair treatment
from the association which they
Say Investigated grievances of Oth
er managers, iguorlng Shubert
complaints.
very lengthy and required over
half- an hour for its reading. It
goes into the question of the se
crecy of the grand jury from the
famous case of the Earl of Shafts
bury in England, several centuries
ago, to the present day. The court
said that in the argument of the
opposing counsel and in his own
researches he had been unable to
find a single case bearing directly
on the point at issue.
Judge Huneke said there was
much loose talking on the subject
and repeated the statement, first
made by counsel for the defend
ants, that he had given no instruc
tions to the grand jury enjoining
secrecy upon witnesses before
that body.
The court defended Judge Sulli
van with the statement that when
all of the facts pertaining to the
law in the case are known the
harshness of the charge of con
tempt against the judge disap
pears. He said that Judge Sulli
van, on being told of the charge,
urged a full investigation and the
meting out of punishment if found
guilty.
Judge Sullivan admitted discuss
ing his testimony before the grand
jury with N. E. Nuzum, one of Gor
don's attorneys. Nuzum also told
his estlmony to Judge Sullivan and
both told P. C. Sullivan, another
attorney for Gordon, who admitted
interrogating them.
Under Judge Hnneke's ruling
this is not, punishable unless it is
shown that such questions were
asked and answered with intent to
defeat justice. The court found no
such intent In this Instance, the
fact that P. C. Sullivan and N. E.
Nuzum are attorneys for Gordon,
whom the grand jury is investigat
ing, having no bearing on the point
at issue.
DEMOCRATS ARE
DOUBLED OP
JAMEB DALEY AND GEORGE
LATSHAW SHOW UP AS
THIRD WARD NOMINEES
FOR SEATS IN COUNCIL.
The democrats have two men
nominated for the council from the
Third ward. There was a quiet
little game of politics played and
as a result James Daley, formerly
deputy comptroller, nnd Oeorge
Latshaw. a contractor, are the
nominees on the democratic ticket
to run against Councilmen Schiller,
and Lambert, who were thought to
.have no opposition.
The democrats are likely to
make a fight for their men and in
case either is willing to resign tbe
nomination in favor of a stronger
candidate this will be done and a
battle fought out In the Third.
The council is fairly certain to
cotnnin four democrats with Funk
and Brown from the Mist ward
and Cray and Baldwin from the
Second as probable winners. Tbe
presence of N. S. PrAtt at the head
of the ticket in the Fifth ward will
give Orndorff a fighting chance to
win over M. W. Belshaw, although
th's would be a hard fight at the
best. Frank l.avlgne is also a
prominent contender in the Fourth
ward against Charles W. Mohr.
Although Mohr secured the nomi
nation the majority of the vote on
the republican ticket in the three
cornered race was against him.
CALIFORNIA WILL
PAY TAFT'S FARE
(By United Press)
WASHINGTON, April 9.—Ac
cording to v statement of Con
gressman Kahn. California, his
state, if necessary will provide
money for a special train to In
sure the proposed visit of Taft to
the Pacific coast. Taft says he is
unable (0 hear the expense.
In view of this tho California
delegation win urge upon the ap
propriation committee the neces
sity of a deficiency bill providing
120,000 to cover traveling expenses
of Ihe president. Kahn assured
Taft of a hearty reception iv Cali
fornia,
THE SPOKANE PRESS
Weather—Showers tonight or Saturday
PRATT HEIR TO
FASSETT FORT
OPENS HEADQUARTERS IN
BAME PLACE WITH SAME
FURNITURE, BUT IS MINUS
HARRY RHODES.
The Pratt fight goes right on
from the same headquarters in
which the Fassett fight waged
on the second floor 'of the Ziegler
block. Some may suggest that no
change is made in order that Fas
sett men now lining up for Pratt
will feel perfectly at home and
realize instinctively that every
thing is exactly as before.
The work of getting the head
quarters into shape has commenc
ed and the old Fasset furniture is
on the ground as a starter. The
room will be used by the demo
cratic central committee and for
the present H. N. Cockrell is in
charge as secretary, succeding
Harry Rhodes.
At a meeting of the candidates
yesterday afternoon E. O. Connor
was selected as chairman of an
executive committee consisting of
Carl Tuerke .of the First ward,
Lester P. Edge of the Second, E.
A. Childs of the Third. George
Mudgett of the Fourth and Julius
Zlttel of the Fifth.
After the vote is canvassed by
the city council tonight and it is
learned who are chosen as precinct
committeemen a meeting of the
committee will be held tomorrow
to organize the democratic central
committee.
Mr. Pratt stated today that he
would not start his speaking at
meetings immediately but when
he did get started would hit a live
ly clip. He stated that he would
make his position of public mat
ters perfectly plum before the time
came to cast the ballots.
Ef PROBE OF
INSORANCE
The grand jury inquiry into the
affairs of the Pacific Live Stock
Insurance association was con
cluded today noon. Deputy Prose
cutors Donovan and Pelletier con
ducting the investigation on behalf
of the state.
ln addition to the connection
with the company of State Insur
ance Commissioner J. H. Schiveley,
the grand jury is believed to have
probed the charge made by
creditors that the Company was
looted by promoters, who drew
enormous commissions ln cash
while the business written on
which the commissions were allow
ed was paid for in notes, since re
pudiated and now worthless.
In 86 months the following
amounts were drawn as commis
sion by the several officers of the
company: .1. B. Schrock, presi
dent. $2:1.395; W. M. Hunter. $24.-
--895; W. J. Walker, $27,080; EL R.
Ward, $21,902; F. H. Hilliker, $18.-
--804 A total of 8116,646. All of
these men were trustees of the
company.
In the three months of the sum
mer of 1900 that Insurance Com
missioner Schiveley was a trustee
of the company be drew $2.597 as
commissions on business alleged to
have been written.
It is claimed tnal Shrock, Hunt
er, Walker, Ward and Hilliker op
erated another such company in
California before coming to Spo
kane in 1804 and that since leav
ing hero they are now conducting
another concern of this character
in central Oregon.
DROVE STUDENT
INSANE
(By United Press.)
ECO EN E, Ore.. April 9.—Five
students of the University of Ore
gon are on trial here today to de
termine their responsibility for the
insanity of Ralph Bristol, son of J.
N. Bristol, prominent Portland
merchant. They are Chester A.
Downs, son of Professor Downs,
Portland; Wilfred Wattenborg.
James Nelll. Ityron Coodall, John
Rust, and are charged with plung
ing Bristol into a tub of water \.i
the college dormitory Dec. 17. It
is alleged the shock stripped him
of lilb mind.
STANDARD OIL
LOSES TARIFF
(By United Press)
WASHINGTON. April 9.—Upon
motion of Payne the house ln com
mittee of the whole this afternoon
placed petroleum products on the
free list. Standard OH is light lug
for a retention of the tariff.
SPOKANE, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, APRIL 9, 1909
TWINS BRING DEADLY
BLIGHT ON FAMILY
PITTSBURG, April 9.—Following the birth of twin to Mrs.
William Hedinger, her mother, Mrs. Martha Smith, is dead
of the shock. Mrs. Hedinger's husband is a suicide through
grief, while physicians are endeavoring to save the lives of
mother and babies.
When the birth of twins was announce dMrs. Smi'h was
so excited she collapsed and died shortly afterward of heart
failure.
Hedinger, despondent because his family was increased,
went to the barn and shot himself.
WASHINGTON STATE COLLEGE
TEAM CHAMPION RIFLE SHOTS
SPOKANE
RAILWAY
(By United Press)
OLYMPIA, April 9.—Another
electric Interurban line will be
built in the vicinity of Spokane,
according to amended articles of
incorporation filed with the secre
tary of state today by the Panhan
dle Electric Railway & Power Co.
of Spokane. It will construct an
electric or steam road from Priest
river, Idaho, to Priest lake, thence
up the river to the Canadian line.
A line from Spokane to Priest riv
er also proposed.
The company intends to secure
right to build lines into Spokane
and other cities and town of Wash
ington, Idaho, Oregon and British
Columbia,
Jerome Drumheller is the chief
Spokane capitalist interested in
the Panhandle project.
BIG REGISTRATION
FOR PRIMARIES
According* to the count of the
city clerk completed today the to
tal registration for the primaries
was 15,t>79. The registration books
close for the election next Tuesday
after which time the voters will be
unable to change their residence
and hold their vote. The registra
tion is coming in very slowly and
it is doubtful whether the total will
pass the 16,000 mark. The major
ity of those coming in to register
at present merely change their
residence.
PAYNE TARIFF
UP FOR VOTE
WASHINGTON. April 9.—After
the committee of the whole report
ed, the house this afternoon, in
regular session, adopted all amend
ments to the Payne bill adopted by
the committee of the whole with
the exception of those commodities
mentioned in the special rule Mon
day. Speaker Cannon asked the
members on what schedules the
house wished a special vote.
He was told hy various members
that special votes were desired on
lumber, hides, barley, barley malt.
No special vote was asked on tea
and coffee, as the house agreed to
amendments placing them on the
free list, it was decided the first
special vote will be taken on lum
ber.
C.W. HELLENBRAND
IS DEAD
C, w. Hellenbrand died today
after an illness of several weeks
at his home at 23 Welden Court.
Mr. Hellenbrand was In the cigar
business ln this city and bis store
was on the corner of Front avenue
and Howard street. A complica
tion of heart trouble was the
cause of death. Tbe remains will
be sent to his old home at Salem.
Oregon, for interment aud the
funeral will bo held in Oregon
April 13. Mr. Hellenbrand was the
father of Charles Hellenbrand, who
died hero several years ago and
who was one of the most popular
Elks in the city.
E. A. HITCHCOCK DEAD
(By United Press)
WASHINGTON. April 9.—Ethan
Allen Hitchcock, secretary of the
interior under McKlnley, died to
day at the home of his son In law.
Commander W. S. Sims, of the
navy.
Death had heen expected some
time. Fatal illuess was canned by
a cold contracted at St. I.onis
seven weks ago. He was hurried
here to have the services of spe
cialists.
(By United Press)
WASHINGTON, April 9.—The
judge of the National Rifle asso
ciation today announced that
Washington State college won the
rifle shooting championship of uni
versities and colleges last week
on scores of 949 out of a possible
1000. The average was 94.9 per
man. Columbia university, New
York, was second.
SAYS ORPHAN BOY
WAS UNJUST
Ernest Gould ot the Ferndale
dairy says the story told by Don
Hall, the orphan boy found shlver
ingon t h f street, does Gould an in
justice. He says he got the boy
from the truant officer to work for
board and schooling and that the
boy wouldn't go to school. He says
he gave the boy all the side money
he took in.
Gould also says he was not on
the place when the boy left and did
not drive him off, although he says
Hall had trouble with Mrs. Gould
and misused their child.
ONE DEAD AND
TWO ARE DYING
(By United Press)
POINT RICHMOND, Cal.. April
9.—One man is dead, two dying and
three badly injured ac the result
of an explosion of an oil still in the
big Standard Oil works here this
morning. The loss is $150,000.
PROTEST ON FRANCHISE.
Another protest has been filed
with the council against granting
the franchise to the Spokane, Port
land & Seattle, as it now reads.
Residents west of Hangman creek
and west of the proposed right of
way have protested that the line as
sought would shut off that section
of the city. It is asked that the
council compel the road to give a
grade crossing at Seventh avenue
and a viaduct at Eighth avenue
and require the company to build a
road along the west side of right of
way to a point where Holley street
meets Seventh avenue.
COMMITTEE TAKES CHARGE.
George Burtt, who as secretary
conducted the winning fight for J.
T. Omo. has dropped out as Mr.
Omo watned to leave the republic
an central committee a free hand
in perfecting its organization.
There is no disaffection with Burtt.
PROTECT EXTENSION.
A number of property owners on
Twelfth avenue, between Pittsburg
and Perry streets, have filed a pro
test with the city council against
including the territory in a sewer
district further east on Twelfth.
The protest states that In laying
the sewer between Pittsburg and
Perry street the contractor would
have to dig through loose soil but
If the eastern end of the avenue
was included the petitioners would
have to pay a part of the cost of
cutting through the solid rock east
of Pittsburg street
COUNTERFEITER BUBPECT
1-oren Branding, suspected of be
ing one of the counterfeiters whose
bad metal has been victimizing
merchants here for months, is in
the city jail. He was arrested last
night by Detectives Miles, Dial and
Draper. His case is to be taken
before United States Attorney
Avery today.
TEDDY AT PORT BAID.
PORT SAID, April 9 —Roosevelt
and lmrty arrived here tonight.
The trip was without incident.
POWDER MILLS EXPLODE.
(By United Press)
WAYNE, N. J.. April 9.—
Nino mills were destroyed
by a powder explosion at
Dupont works, near hero,
this morning. One man was
killed and several Injured.
Tbe damage Is $50,000.
JUDGE ROOT
TESTIFIES
Judge Milo A. Root of Seattle,
who resigned his position on the
supreme bench because of his con
fidential relations with Judge M. J.
Gordon, former counsel for the
Great Northern, was before the
grand jury this afternoon.
Prosecutor Pugh and the grand
jury were armed with Judge Root's
admissions before the investigat
ing committee of the state bar as
sociation, on which the calling of
the grand Jury inquiry into the
Root Gordon case was based.
STATEMENT OF
HINKLE SIDE
In answer to the morning paper
on Grant Hinkle, representing him
as trying to deliver his vote to
"Dutch Jake," the Hinkle cam
paign committee makes the follow
ing statement today:
The committee consider that Mr.
Hinkle and the committee have
been placed in an improper light
before the public. We desire to
say:
First, that by a vote of the
people the principles that we ad
vocated and urged for adoption
have been turned down.
Second, that Mr. Hinkle urged
the abolition of the saloon and the
dive; that all other candidates in
the primaries stood against him.
Third, that there has been nom
inated a republican candidate and
a democratic candidate, between
whom we see no issue.
Fourth, we wish it distinctly un
derstood that we, as a committee,
do not indorse anyone; we know
that we could not deliver the in
telligent voter, such as supported
Mr. Hinkle. We do not asst.me to
dictate to any voters in the elec
tion whom he shall support. No
one has authority to pledge the
people that voted for Mr. Hinkle.
Fifth, we advise that the issues,
so far as stated, is one of men and
nothing of principle. We recom
mend that each individual voter
examine carefully all matters and
the men now candidates and vote
conscientiously for that man and
the party that they think is to the
best interests of all. Above all we
recommend careful investigation
before making a decision as to how
they shall vote.
Mr. Hinkle and his supporters
have made a clean campaign for
a clean purpose, but we have lost.
We have no sores and have no re
grets that we made the effort. We
thank those that gave loyal sup
port to the principles advocated
and voted for. You stood for prin
ciple then: do so hereafter, when
possible. J. P. Perkins, Chairman:
E. Potter Hall, J. W. Osborne, com
mittee.
0 DEATH! WHERE
IS THY STING?
Spurred Into rapid preparations
and a mad dash In the patrol
wngon by a report that a man lay
either dead or dying in the North
ern Pacific freight yards. Officer
Snamiska, Dr. Eikenbarry and
Nurse Woodruff of the emergency
hospital found Klmer Goodwin ly
ing prostrate between two switch
tracks. In their minds there was
little doubt at first sight that poor
Elmer was a dead one. They in
vestigated somewhat.
"U-mumni sklboochl Wheel
t'm-r-real Kentuckian' Whoopee!"
responded the "dead one" as the
doctor and the steward were about
to lay him gently on the stretcher.
Then they got a blast of his breath.
Elmer is a Kentuckian, all right.
MAYOR MOORE
DODGING TODAY
Mayor Moore Is dodging around
the city hall today as a result of
bis statement that a man over 40
should either take chloroform or
quit a city job. Commissioner W.
W. Witherspoon la one of the men
who wanls a heart to heart talk
with the mayor, and there are
others who feel they are not too
old for the job.
Abeer bottle bearing a chloro
form label nnd an Inscription was
deposited on the mayor's desk this
morning. The Inscription read:
"A May tonic. Good for the mayor
and other city employes over 40
years old.''
BULLDOG BUSINESS.
Tbe Spokane Humane society
shipped two blooded French bull
dogs to Mrs. Henry Pentenoy of
Chicago yesterday. Mis. Pentenoy
Is the owner of the mother of
these dogs, having purchased her
lv Paris for $500.
BTi ONE CENT
SEVENTH YEAR, No. 132. 30 CENTS PER MONTH
ORPHAN HOME
"GRAFT"
Here is the kind of "graft" that
is going on at the Orphans' Home
of Spokane. ElO Liberty avenue.
Mrs. Peterson, who is looking af
ter the children's care as matron
at the magnificent salary of $15
per month, has decided to sell a
piano that was given her long ago
in order to help keep the home go
ing.
Through the efforts of Secretary
Jones through the 150,00 club to
close up the home by preventing
it receiving the aid planned for it
| the women at the home have had
some bftter days, but they are
meeting it as women whose hearts
and intentions are right always do.
Jones' professed idea was to
move the children to the Home of
the Friendless, on "economical
grounds," regardless of the fact
GORDON HINTED FREE FARE ON
POLITICAL GROUNDS TO PRATT
"I never heard the name of Ser
geant D. D. McPhee mentioned ln
connection with the story that I
was given railroad transportation
until Mr. John Bunn used the
name," stated N. S. Pratt this
morning when Sergeant McPhee
called on him in regard to a cam
paign story published.
Sergeant McPhee stated that
when Mr. Pratt assailed him some
time ago he was on the warpath
and was told to go to John Bunn
and he would get a hot line on
Pratt. McPhee told Pratt Bunn
said that in consideration for
Pratt's vote favoring the Northern
Pacific on the equalization board
Pratt was given transportation for
himself and family to Coos Bay.
Sergeant McPhee told Mr. Pratt
this morning that he would take
witnesses before Mr. Bunn and
prove that Bunn started the story,
and he also stated he would go be
fore a notary If Mr. Pratt ques-
KICK ON ICE
CAKE STAMP
A-Y-P EXPOSITION OFFICERS
OBJECT TO THEORY THAT
ALASKA IS A LAND OF BNOW
AND FROZEN WATER
(By United Press)
SEATTLE, April 9.—Upon read
ing in newspapers that Postmaster
General Hitchcock approved a
special Alaska-Yukon-Pacific expo
sition postage stamp carrying a de
sign showing a seal standing by a
cake of ice, the chamber of com
merce and officers of the exposition
jointly signed the following tele
gram :
"Hon. R. A. JUallinger, secretary
of the treasury, Washington: We
believe the design on the exposi
tion stamp showing an ice cake is
a mistake. Tbe aim of the Alaska
exhibit under your department is
to correct the Impression that
Alaska is a land of snow and ice
berg. Won't you protest to the
postmaster general?"
ESCAPES BY SUICIDE.
(By United Press.)
SAN ItAFAKL. Cal., April 9.—
After eluding a posse In an all
night race for life over the hills,
Hilly Weacott, half breed Indian,
returned to a ranch near Mar
shall* And standing over the body
of his wife, whom he murdered
DECISION NO DEFEA T FOR
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
The proscutlng attorney's office
feels very much encouraged by the
decision of the supreme court Just
handed down on the question of
taking shorthand notes in the
grand jury room.
Five of the Judges of the su
preme court, without touching the
merits of the question, deny the
writ of review of Judge Hnneke's
Instruction as to shorthand notes
on the ground that the same was
not properly before the court.
Three judges in a dissenting |
opinion held that if the court
hampered the prosecutor in con-!
ducting ibe investigation lv should 1
be cited lo appear, and a fourth,
judge, who was not present, holds
the same opinion, making foot Of
the uiue judges favorable to II final
that the Liberty avenue home le
also the home of the women there
and represents all they have slaved
and hoped for.
The fact that a 150,000 club bene
fit at the Auditorium closely fol
lowed the knocking out of a bene
fit for the orphans' home originally
scheduled for tonight put a com
mercial as well as "economical"
phase on the affair, however; that
lines the club up ln a fight against
women and parentless children tot
public support, with the advan
tage to the club in being able to
prevent the IMM •sjgmrtng as •
competitor.
It was the most heartless trans
action that was ever engineered in
this city and was accomplished
only by unfair statement, biased to
that end.
tioned his word and make affidavit.
Mr. Pratt assured Sergeant Mc-
Phee that he believed him and
stated that in his talk with Mr.
Bunn the latter evaded direct
questions and said that McPhee
had gone so far as to send a man
to St. Paul to get the records. Mc-
Phee says a man did go to St.
Paui. but this man was Mr. Bonn
and that he came back empty
handed.
Mr.»Pratt then talked considera
bly about railroad transportation
and stated that he never received a
mile of transportation at any time.
He freely admitted that he asked
the Grtat Northern for transporta
tion on account of lumber ship
ments made by his company, but
that when Judge M. J. Gordon in
timated that he might be able to
give the transportation on political
grounds Pratt let the matter drop.
Mr. Pratt stated that this occurred
when the law did not prohibit the
acceptance of free transportation.
TRYING TO WORK WHEN
TOO WEAK TO WALK
Typhoid fever, from
which Harry Collins, a
painter living at 1213 Lib
erty avenue, has just re
covered, so weakened his
condition that he fell from
sheer exhaustion at the cor
ner of Lincoln street and
Sprague avenue this morn
ing when about to board a
car to go to work.
Collins' chest struck a
rail from which the surface
of the street, is cleared
away by excavations and he
was unconscious when pick
ed up. The patrol wagon
took him to the emergency
hospital, where after medi
cal attention he went home.
last night, placed a gun against
his head and committed suicide
early this morning. He killed
his wife last night in a quarrel.
RELEASE WOMAN
ON APPEAL
Irene Wilson, the woman recent
ly convicted in the superior court
of this county as an accomplice ln
highway robbery, is to be released
on an appeal bond, wealthy rela
tives having come to her aid.
The woman will probably remain
in this city until a decision Is ren
dered by the higher court.
decision on the merits of the quea
j tlon, which finding Prosecutor
Pugh believes would be In his
favor.
The shorthand notes are now be
ing taken in the grand Jury room,
it is presumed, as the foreman of
the grand jury, Mr. Davis, told
Judge Huneke last Saturday that
the grand Jury had ordered the
• prosecutor to take the notes in
! shorthand. The court made no ob
jection, merely cautioning the
grand jury to hold onto the testi
mony.
Prosecutor Pugh has asked for
a rehearing lv the supreme court
with the hope of getting the court
t,i iciuler :i square-toed decision on
the question of his right to take,
the stenographic uotea.

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