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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, January 10, 1910, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1910-01-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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ONE CENT IN CITY. ON TRAINS, FIVE CENTS.
PINCHOT IS FORMING A REPLY TO TAFT
SUPPORTERS
OFTAFTARE
WORRIED
PINCHOT HAS BEEN IN
COMMUNICATION
WITH T. R.
(By United Press.)
WASHINGTON, Jan. 10.—Gifford
Pinchot is preparing a statement
which will be designed to vindicate
his position in the controversy
which led to his dismissal as chief
forester by President Taft.
Stork's that Pinchot has been in j
communication with Colonel Roose-i
velt, since the former president |
went to Africa, are not denied by
PlnohOt'a friends today. The Taft j
administration supporters appear
to be much concerned over the pos
sible contents of the Pinchot state
ment. It is expected it. will point
out in strong terms what Pinchot
considers the dangers of the alti
tude of the Taft administration to
ward the conservation of the na
tional resources.
Pinchot is preparing his state
ment in his capacity as a private
citizen. The work so far has been
slow, as he has been constantly In
terrupted by a stream of sympa
thetic visitors, Who called to ex
press their regret that he has left
the government service. He is be
ing almost buried under an ava
lanche of mail and telegrams from
sympathisers throughout the coun
try.
SPOKANE
A REFUGE
FOR SICK
FLOCK TO CITY EMERGENCY
HOSPITAL—MAKE THINGS
TOO CONGESTED
Spokane is becoming sort of a
dumping ground for the thriftless
sick nnd disabled of the entire In
land Empire. If you do not believe
the above statement, all you have
to do is to spend a day, or a shorter
time for that matter, at the city
emergency hospital,
Here come the sick nnd maimed
from all sections of the surround
ing country, asking for help or
treatment. Since the emergency
hospital Is provided for emergency
cases only, Ihe stewards, Dare and
Milburn, imd Emergency Physician
O'Shea are obliged to refer the
applicants to the county physician.
Inquiries from these applicants
■how that a great majority of I hem
have been here only a few days,
having come from some of the
nearby towns. Some come from
t anada. In their helpless condi
tion, it is impossible to turn them
away, it' s not equitable, however,
that the places from which they
come do not take cognizance of
their condition, and do their fair
■ban 1» bearing the burden of
their care.
Alter they have received treat
ment here, these people spread
forth the tidings of the goodness of
this county, causing others to fol
low In their footsteps, While no
one of the citizens of this city or
county would complain about car
ing for the sick who belong here, It
la not fuir that they should be call
ed upon to pay taxes for the care
of the sick of the entire surround
ing region.
A VIA TION
MEET IS ON
I.OS ANGELES, Jan. 10.—Today
witnessed the opening of the avia
tion meet with a gas balloon con
test between Clifford Harmon, the
New York millionaire, and Frank
K. Knnue of Peoria. 111., with hiG
balloon "Peoria, Willard Knaben
rhue, with a CurtlSS aeroplane, is
leady tor the elimination trials this
nfternoon. Paulban's Parman ma
chine has just arrived, and prob
ably will not be ready today.
POSTMASTER OF LACON- «
NER. •
Jan. 10 — •
The nomination of John P. Mc- •
Glynn as postmaster of I.a- 1
Conner, Wash., was made to i
day by President Taft. '
G. W. MORSE
IS NOW NO.
2,814
STILL GAME, AND SAYS HE
WILL CONTINUE TO FIGHT
FOR LIBERTY.
TO BE TREATED WELL
"NO. 2814," GARBED IN BLUE
UNIFORM, TAKES THINGS
CALMLY.
POEM WHICH
MORSE TOOK TO
PENITENTIARY
Following is the poem 'invic
tus," by W. E. Henley, which
Charles W. Morse learned in the
Tombs and which he took with
him into the federal penitentiary
at Atlanta:
Out of the night that covers me,
Black as the pit from pole to
pole.
I thank whatever gods there be
For my unconquerable soul.
In the fell clutch of circum
stance
I have not winced or cried
aloud:
Under the bludgeonings of fate
My head is bloody but un
bowed.
It matters not how strait the
gate,
How charged with punishment
the scroll;
1 am the master of my fate,
1 am the captain of my soul!
ATLANTA, Ga., Jan. 10.—Ten
minutes after the big steel door of
the I'nited Status penitentiary here
swung shut behind Charles w.
Morse, but a few days ago a man of
millions, he had censed to exist so
cially. He had become convict No.
2814, and clad in an ill fitting suit
of rough blue clothes, was marched
into the big dining hall, and with
negroes, Indians. Chinamen and
whites of every condition, took his
first meal under the roof that is to
shut out his liberty for 15 years.
He found placed before him jel
lied bread, coffee, sugar and milk,
lie could not eat, and that was the
first sign he has permitted to es
cape him of the terrific strain he
has been under since he began in
New York the journey to what is
called his "life term."
After walking through a crowd of
morbid nnd curious with head erect.
Morse was received by Warden Wil
liam 11. Mover. To the latter he
made a formal protest against his
Incarceration, as he had been in
structed to do by his counsel.
Says He'll Be a Gentleman.
in giving tiie prisoner his orders
file warden said:
"Mr. Morse, you have always
been a gentleman in your behavior
outside of this place. 1 am sure
thai you will be so here."
"You may be sure of that." was
the quiet response, and then he was
led away to be ha I bed, vaccinated
and measured for the Itertillon rec
ords. Then he was photographed
and put in a reception o*ll until
such time as he may he given a cell
with another prisoner. Who this
will be is not known, but the doub
ling up Is necessary as the prison is
overcrowded.
No. 2811 henceforth supplants his
name, lie has been imt hi the first
grade of prisoners, which entitles
him to all the privileges that the
best behaved may enjoy.
LOWER BOND
IN ATKINSON
GRAFT CASE
CUT FROM $5000 BEFORE TO
$1000 —HEARING WILL COME
UP TOMORROW
County Clerk C. 10. Atkinson was
arraigned before .ludge H. 1,. Ken
nan this morning on the oharge of
profiting from the use of trust
funds, his bond was reduced from
$.~.min to |1000, and tomorrow at
9:30 o'clock was the time set for
the entering of a plea.
Deputy Prosecutor Don i\ Klser
slated tills morning that the $.">ono
bond of Atkinson WM fixed by
.ludge Webster In the belief that
the county clerk was charged with
v felony. The offense with which
he Is charged Is only I gross mis
demeanor and therefore ituoo is
considered sufficient bond.
It doesn't look as if the shirt
waist makers, on strike, will win
their demand to have their union
recognized.
Hut out of 300 employers 251 in
dividual firms have granted the
time and money demands of the
girls and have agreed not to dis
criminate against members of the
new union.
That Blamed Old Cold!
There's All Kinds of Ways'
to Catch It, and Here Are
a Few—Look Out for the 1
Big Dinner, and Don't Let
Your Cold Run Along.
The annual winter epidemic of
colds, coughs and sneezing in Spo
kane is in full blast. Thousands of
people in Spokane are afflicted
more or less severely. Though the
winter months usher in the greatest
suffering from colds. It is not
weather itself that causes all the
coughing. Two of the mildest win
ters, IS9O and 1891, saw a great
spread of influenza all bver the
land. Many doctors are talking yet
about the hard work they had in '91.
Somebody once defined a cold as
"a disease from which you didn't
FUNNY OLD
QUACK CURES
Here are some old time cold
remedies that doctors say will
do more harm than good, al
-1 hough they were in high favor
a generation or so ago.
BRIAR CURB—Qum from a
cut in a briar bush, eaten, was
once called a sure cold cure.
STOCKING CURB — Remove
stocking from foot and bind it
around the neck when retiring
at night.
JELLY CURE—Jelly of black
currants (never red currants)
eaten three times a day.
HERRING CURE —Wear salt
herring in the shoes. This cure
comes from Ireland.
LIMB CURE —A small piece
of lime allowed to slake on the
tongue.
ANTI-BILIOUS PILLS —Th's
fake remedy i.as been exposed
many times, but is still popular
in rural districts.
suffer much, but which took about
six months to cure."
Doctors themselves admit that
the nature of colds varies with the
individual. For instance, there are
at least "d kinds of sore throat.
Crowds in trains, churches, the
theater, dance ball! and other
crowded places are conducive to
tiie spread of colds. Dance halls
are one of the principal sources of
coughing.
Benjamin Franklin once wrote an
essay on colds. Some of the things
he said are good today. He pointed
out that the weather alone could
not cause colds and coughing. Turk
ish bath attendants are in hot air
one minute, and cold water the
next) yet they do not take cold.
Neither did the Indians, when they
roamed through snow up to their
necks. Colds and OOUghlng were
unknown to them until the days of
civilization. '
Overeating and Improper feeding
are things that will make 'most
anybody subject to the despised
cough. There's been a lot of holi
day overeating lately, and this may
have caused the cold epidemic.
Ever since old fashioned alman
acs began to circulate, home rente
dicH for colds have been tried, nut
none of then is reliable. Any doc
tor knowa this.
When people begin to cough, as
many in Spokane are doing now,
they are laying the foundation for
more trouble.
If you have taken cold—
Don't monkey with It.
Don't let It run along.
See a doctor and follow his ad
vice.
Where the soldier kills 1000 men,
SPOKANE WASHINGTON, MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 1910
Of the 40,000 girls who struck,
all but 6000 have returned to
work.
The heroines of the strike were
the girls who served time in the
workhouse for missionary work
among strike breakers. At a vast
meeting at Carnegie hall society
women, including Mrs. O. H. P.
Belmont, Anna Morgan, daughter
How'd You Get It?
a famous doctor once said, the cook
in the kitchen kills her 10,000. Se
if you are one of them in Spokane
who hasn*t caught cold yet, BE
CAUEFIL ABOUT YOUR EAT
ING. /
"Feed a cold and starve a fever"
was one of the worst pieces of ad
vice ever ilanded out to a coughing
public. Fevers follow colds and
most colds are accompanied by
fever. I
What's a Cold? Will, Doctors
Don't Know Much About It
WASHINGTON. D. C, Jan. 10.—
What is a cold?
This query interests three of
Uncle Sam's most noted medical ex
perts thes wintry days. Surgeons
General George H. Torney of the
army and P. M. Rixey of the navy
have issued bulletins telling how to
avoid colds. Surgeon General Wal
ter Wyman of the public health and
marine hospital service also has
come out with a crusade against
colds.
Their work reveals the fact that
no body of medical men will agree
on just what causes people to be
come victims of colds in various
forms. While millions are coughing,
the government is studying the var
ious cures for influenza.
The Floyd-Lucas treatment for'
| had colds is being tried on the j
j navy's hospital ships this winter.
Mrs. Cleveland Floyd and William I
P. Lucas of the Harvard Medical |
j school were guided in their work by'
Metehnikoff, the Russian germ ex
pert.
He believes that colds are caused
Iby lack of white corpuscles in the
: blood. When these leucocytes, as !
: they are called, are below standard,
pneumonia will set in.
Dr. Rlxey has received a report
of the doctors' work in the Massa-
BETTING
SWINGS
AROUND
CONSERVATIVES NOW FIVE TO
FOUR FAVORITES.
ENGLAND IS EXCITED
% (By United Press)
LONDON, Jan. 10. -Odds of five
to four that the conservatives will
be successful at the coming na
tional elections wen' offered at the
stock exchange today.
Tliis is the first time since the
beginning of the campaign that the
conservatives have ruled favorites
in the betting. Prior to the Christ
mas holidays, the liberals were
seven to four favorites.
King Kdwiud today signed a
formal decree dissolving parlia
ment. Immediately afterward,
writs for the election that may es
tablish an epoch in English history
were issued.
of J. Pierpont Morgan, and many
other celebrities, sat in boxes
while tribute was paid by such
speakers as Martin W. Littleton
and by members of the girls' union
to the 19 girls who bore the work
house brand. Signs stretched
across their chests marked the
gfrls who had done time on the isl
and, and they wore them proudly.
Your doctor is the best adviser
you can get if you are coughing, for
the treatment of the cold depends
on the individual.
What may cure you would do
somebody else little good. The doc
tor is the person to decide.
F*esh air, good food, plenty of
puje water to drink and sensible
irtf** ajfe four sure preventatives of
cofdj if good care is taken of the
body. Your doctor is the man to
give you medicine for your cold. ,
chusetts General hospital. Out of
.41 cases of pneumonia and bad
colds treated by their methods, 36
recovered.
Their treatment is by injection of
the white corpuscles of human
blood. After the corpuscles get In
the victim's veins they wiggle their
way into the system and rout the
cold microbes.
Another cure that the govern
ment will try is called the "dry
curte," It should be very popular at
this start of the new year, for the
patient taking the treatment must
not; drink anything for 24 to 48
hollas. Bread, fish, vegetables,
wh|te meat and eggs may be eaten,
though.
Or. Romme of Parle and Dr.
Steinberg of Vienna indorse this
colid cure.
Still another cure comes from
New York. A doctor there thinks
than whiskers shelter the cold mi
orobes. He says that smooth
Shaven men take cold less easily
thoft men with mustaches or beards.
Hia cold cure is simple. AH one
do is to get shaved —that is,
if he" hasn't been shaved already.
Tnns the cures go on. There is
a cold cure for every day of the
year, yet nobody In the service of
Uncle Sam seems to be agreed on
the best treatment.
UNDERTAKERS'
AGREEMENT
IS BROKEN
It looks as If that agreement
tmtw the local undertakers not to
hold Sunday funerals will go up In
smoke us a result of the Buchanan
company handling the funeral of
W, If,. Chambers, the pioneer min
ing mm, yesterday. The other un
dertakers consider that the
Buclihuuu company has broken the
ugiv.inent. and according to their
Statements today, stand ready to
accommodate anyone in the future
who wants to be buried on Sunday.
This means the breaking of tiie
■freemen! signed by the members
of th#ministerial alliance, too.
. NOTICE TO PRESS READERS
> The Press should be dcliv
• ered not later than 6:30 every
> evening, and if you don't get
» yours by that time, kindly do
> us as well as yourself a favor
> by calling up the Circulation
> Department, Main 375, when
> we wilt send you one by spe
> cial messenger.
10-YEAR-
OLD BOY
MURDERS
"LOOK OUT, MRS. SULLIVAN,
I'M GOING TO
SHOOT."
SHOT WOMAN IN HEAD
CASE PERPLEXING PROBLEM
FOR THE POLICE TO
SOLVE.
(By United Press)
PORT COSTA, Cal., Jan. 10.—Joe
Crowley, aged 10, charged with the
murder of Mrs. Patrick Sullivan,
mother of six children, presents
the most perplexing problem to lo
cal officers in this county's history.
"Look out, Mrs. Sullivan; I'm
going to shoot you," cried the little
boy as he pointed a rusty revolver
at the woman as she stood upon
the railway platform. Mrs. Sulli
van, half smiling, half frightened,
started toward the boy to seize
the weapon. The little fellow tight
ened his grasp on the pistol, there
was a loud report and a flash and
the woman lunged forward, with a
bullet in her brain. In a few min
utes she was dead.
The boy was frightened nearly to
death. He had been playing with
the revolver, along with half a
dozen other boys, all yesterday aft
ernoon. It was toward dusk when
Mrs. Sullivan appeared and the lit
tle fellow conceived the fatal plan
of shooting her. Officers are trying
to learn who is responsible for
leaving a loaded revolver where
it could be found by children.
Major J. M. T. Partelo, a former
champion crack shot of the army,
has arrived at Fort Wright to take
up his duties with the Twenty-fifth
infantry.
SIX JAPANESE 60IDES MARRIED
ACCORDING TO BUDDHIST DUES
IWANA TAHARA, ONE OF THE BRIDES.
SEATTLE, Wash., Jan. 10.—Six
little heathen Japanese girls, who
sailed away from Japan a few
months ago, have just become
brides here. They were married ac
cording to the rites of the Mud
dhist religion, in Japan they hud
become proxy wives of Japanese
men in America, but proxy mar
riages don't satisfy Uncle Sam.
From Washington and California
and other western states the bride
grooms came to claim their brides.
Ilev. Hoahln Fuji!, priest of a little
BtlddhlSt temple, conducted the
rites. And this is how they were
married:
V\ ith the bride standing on one
side of the shrine and the bride
groom on the other, in the presence
of two witnesses, the priest made
the proclamation of marriage be
fore the god Buddha. Then follow
ed the oaths.
The only difference In the oaths
is the order of the words love and
respect. The husband swears first
to respect, then love; the wife
swears first to love and then re
spect.
Follow ing the oaths the five rules
of conduct were laid down lor eauh:
So they were married, and "for
keeps." Divorces are un
known among the Buddhist Japa
EIGHTH YEAR, No. 54 10 CENTS PER WEEK
S. A. MANN
MAY ENTER
I LISTS
SERIOUSLY CONSIDERING FRE
QUENT CALLS FROM
FRIENDS TO RUN
CONGRESS.
BELIEVES IN PEOPLE
JUDGE MANN THINKS A STAND
PATTER WILL NOT HAVE
MUCH SHOW IN RACE.
The congressional bee Is buzzinz
in the cars of Justice 3. A. Mann,
judge of the Spokane police court.
The bee was set in motion by his
friends and of late has been work
ing harder than ever.
Judge Mann has thus far resisted
the importunities of his friends to
make the race. He has the matter
under consideration and there Is
a strong probability that at the time
the word is given Judge Mann will
be among the entries in the great
race.
Judge Mann today, in response
to the question of whether or not he
would be a candidate, said:
"When the matter was first
broached to me I dismissed it with
the statement that the place was
for older heads in the political
game. Hut the suggestions to en
ter the race have continued to come
until I am forced to give the matter
serious consideration.
"Should I conclude to enter the
race you will find me standing close
to the people and supporting men
and measures that peonffe approve
of. I coincide with the , statement
in the Sunday Press that the next
congressman from this district
must be a progressive?, for none
other will gain public support.
"However, if I become a candi
date I will announce ray views on
public questions in due time."
nese. Asked for the reason for few
divorces, an attendant of the priest
gave this explanation:
"The marriage contract is very
solemn, and is a contract not mere
ly between the two young people.
The marriage la arranged by their
parents. Parents are older, they
have more judgment and choose
w itll greater w isdoiu.
"In America your young people
make the choice for themselves.
Yon just love and go ahead."
BUDDHIST RULES OF CONDUCT.
For the husband: 1. In going out
and coming in, respect your wife.
2. Have your meals together, a id.
according to the season, supply her
with food and clothing. 3. Also
give her money. 4. (This rule has
to do with domestic affairs.) 5.
You are commanded to be faithful.
For the wife: 1. The husband
coming back from the outside, go to
the door and welcome him. 2. The
husband going out, give him a meal,
also a clean house, and wait for his
return. 3. It is not allowed to give
her heart to other people. 4. Ac
cording to the husband's orders,
perform the husband's orders, oer
form the household duties and have
no secrets. 6. The husband going
to bed, see that the house is locked
and in good order, then retire also.
ESCAPE OF
PRISONER
IS NIPPED
WHIZ OF BULLET NEAR HIS
HEAD, AND THOUGHT 3OF
FREEDOM VANISH
LACKED I. W. W, SPEED
"fflpp!" whistled a bullet past the
head of Charles Louden, would be
Jail escape, this morning, and plunk
fell Charles upon the earth, with
all thoughts of freedom vanished
from his brain.
Emboldened by the near-escape of
Pansner last Saturday, Louden
seized the first opportunity to leave
his sidewalk celaning companions
and started across the lot north of
the courthouse.
Deputy Sheriff Max Anderson
was on the Job, however, and three
bullets which whistled perilously
near the fugitive made him think
better of his plans for flight and
throw himself upon the ground to
escape the fusilade of bullets. Lou
den is still at work in the side
walk gang, but drags around a
couple of balls as mementos of his
attempted flight.
Louden was sentenced to three
months in jail, a $250 fine and |75
costs by Judge J. Stanley Webster
on November 2 for conspiracy. He
and John Logan framed up a deal
whereby J. L. McCrea bought a
worthless moving picture machine
upon the representation that he was
to have a 32 weeks' job at $30 per
week.
WILL NOT
BLACKLIST
SWITCHMEN
NO CREDENCE PLACED IN RE
PORT —A POSSIBILITY OF
SETTLEMENT.
The strike may soon be settleo
and the switchmen go back in their
old places in the locsl yards. (Have
you ever heard that statement be
fore?) The local switchmen have
received reports to the effect that
the heads of the railway department
of the American Federation of La
bor are today In session at the
Twin Cities and that news of a set
tlement may be received.
Although no definite reports have
been sent out, it is believed thai
the purpose of the meeting at the
Twin Cities is to consider the re
sults of the work of Chairman Per
ham of the railway department,
v ho has been at the national capi
tal in an endeavor to bring about
an agreement between the roads
and the strikers.
Local switchmen admit that tho
result of the present conference
will be either a settlement or a
sympathetic strike on the part of
the other railroad orders of the
A. F. of L.
The striking switchmen here
place no credence in the reports
that the roads will blacklist men
who take part in the strike. It is
believed that the announcement is
enly a bluff on the part of the roaos
to swing the strikers into line.
THE NATION
STANDS BT
0. PINCHOT
RECOGNIZES DIFFERENCE BE
TWEEN "LAW HONEST"
AND TRUE MORAL ZEAL
(By United Press)
CHICAGO, Jan. 10.—The country
will stand by Gifford Pinchot, right
or wrong, according to tho Tribune,
which says editorially:
"Without inquiring Into the tech*
nical justice of the discharge of
Pinchot, the Tribune must repeat
that the country will stand by
Pinchot, right or wrong. It does not
understand legal technicalities and)
I. prepared to accept the president's
statement that Bailinger aoted
within the law. But long sine* the
country has been able to distlngulaft
men who are Maw honest' and those
who are moved by moral seal fee
the preservation of public interest
against private privilege. 1 *

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