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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, March 17, 1910, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88085947/1910-03-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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HERE'S TO THE IRISH—THE WITTIEST, JOLLIEST PEOPLE AND NERVIEST FIGHTERS ON EARTH
FOR SPOKANE AND
THIS LITTLE AD
Secured a desirable tenant:
"Board and room, $5 per
week. 0712 Jefferson street.
Phone, Maxwell 3332-L."
•ONE CENT IN CITY. ON TRAINS, FIVE CENTS.
SULLIVAN'S BRUTAL SYSTEM KILLING MAN
OPINION DIVIDED ON TERMINAL RATE PROPOSITION
LEGALITY
IS GRAVE
QUESTION
THE PRESS SECURES SEVERAL
VALUABLE INTERVIEWS.
RATES ARE TYRANNICAL
There it a divided sentiment
among the business men on the ad
visability of excluding the Milwau
kee and North Coast railroads until
they agree to grant terminal rates
in their franchises. Everybody
wants terminal rates, but the ques
tion is whether it is advisable to
hold a club over the new roads and
take chances of losing them in or
der to get it.
There is no hostile feeling against
the Milwaukee and the North Coast,
but there is fooling against the Hill
and llnrriman systems, Which are
k sponsible for the rate Injuries so
long endured by Spokane. The ar
gument is offered that by holding
out against the North ("oast and the
Milwaukee Spokane is playing into
the hands of the robber gang that
has held up the shippers of this city
for years.
The shippers that insist on the
terminal rate clause say such an op
portunity as the present to secure
Continued on page 2.
LITTLE BOY MISSING
The 3-year-old son of Mrs. Rice,
who resides at W1217 Fourth ave
nue, disappeared from home this
morning and up until noon today
had not returned. Frantic over the
disappearance of the little fellow,
Mrs. Rice telephoned to police head
quarters to ascertain if anything
had been seen of her darling. Cap
tain Miles told her that the *oy w,is
not at the station, but that an effort
to locate him would be made.. Mrs.
Rice did not give the name of the
boy. She said he was dressed in
■ blue sailor blouse and brown
knickerbockers, and that he is light
complexioned.
TACOMA ATTORNEY'S WIFE WHIPS PRETTY
STENOGRAPHER;JEALOUSY THE CAUSE
(By United Press Leased Wire)
TACOMA, March 17-Attorney
Charles K. George's matrimonial
complications took a new turn
when Mrs. Ida 1.. Austrian George
came over from Seattle and
jAipped Miss Orn L. Christie,
George's stenographer, giving her
n Severe hair pulling and some fis
tic punches. Jealousy was the
cause.
A warrant was sworn out by
Miss Christie's father for Mrs.
Qoorge'a arrest, but she had re
turned to Seattle. The police say
she will be notified to appear in
court.
Miss Christie is In the employ of
HERE IS SOMETHING THAT CHILDREN WILL
LIKE!
THE STORY CLUB
BY EDMUND VANCE COOKE.
Thl6 Story Club Is going to be a source of great enjoyment to
those who love quaint, amusing fancies. The charter members
of the Story Club are The Storyman and eight children who not
only love to hear stories, but like to tell them. So they think up
stories and relate them to each other and one story is funnier
than the other, and they all enjoy a good laugh at the stories
and at each other. And there will be pictures.
Every reader of The Press can become a member of the Story
Club. All you have to do is to help enjoy the stories.
THE STORY CLUB WILL BE OPENED TOMOR
ROW IN THE PRESS.
OSTRANDER FOR
REFERENDUM
BELIEVES FINAL DECISION OF
FRANCHISE CONTROVERSY
SHOULD REST WITH
PEOPLE.
"I suggest that the railroads
put the terminal rate question
up to a vote of all the people,"
said Councilman Ostrander to
day. "I am just as determined
as ever to force terminal rates
from the roads at this time. I,
however, believe in the 'peo
ple's rule,' and am willing that
the final word on this question
be by the people.
"The railways can secure a
special election on these fran
chises and I want them to do
so. I realize that the franchise
must come from the council to
be legal, but the roads can force
the council to grant the fran
chises by a referendum vote, as
was done by the Heme Tele
phone Co. If a majority of the
people want to support the
roads we can find it out in this
way."
GREEN BEER
. BE JABBERS!
There is at least one bar in
town today that is reminding
the thirsty that it is the Siven
teenth of March, God Rist His
Sowl.
This First avenue bar has
been dispensing green beer all
day and though several pa
triotic Irishmen have lingered
long at the tap to prevent any
A. P. A. visitors imbibing the
sacred fluid, the supply is still
holding out strong.
It is a regular beer, appar
ently it has not been colored
locally, it tastes like beer and
looks like paint, or rather like
the deep green waves in mid
ocean with the sun striking
them through.
Nobody but the bartender
knows how it happened, and he
won't tell, but all day he has
been drawing from one of the
regular faucets green beer, and
nobody has seen him dump In
any arsenic, though he. has had
to tap several Hiberian kegs
during the rush.
tlie Union i,aii(i company, but Alio
docs work for George, In whose
office she was regularly employed
until his matrimonial tangle neces
sitated his leaving town for v few
months.
Miss Christie says Mrs, Austrian
George and her sister, Miss Ben
nett of Seattle, walked into the
real estate office in the Bernlce
building shortly before noon yes
terday and, without words, stepped
over to Miss Christie's desk and
struck the young stenographer on
the forehead with her fist.
Site then rained several blows on
the stenographer's head and chest
and only desisted when her sister
pulled her into the corridor.
WEATHER—Showers tonight or
Friday. Max. 68; mm. 44.
TheP^ress
THE PEOPLES PAPER
SULLIVAN
READY TO
QUIT JOB
LACK OF SUPPORT BY MAYOR
GIVEN AS THE CAUSE.
FEARS BECOMING GOAT
MAYOR ON THE FENCE, POLICE
DESERTED IN MATRON
FIGHT.
"Long John" Sullivan, chief of po
lice, is said to be ready to quit. His
reason is given as a lack of support
by the mayor. Sullivan has said, to
his intimate friends, that he made
scores of enemies since going into
office in order to aid the Pratt ad
ministration in a semblance of car
rying out its pledges. Now, when
the chief and the police department
are under fire, it is said that he has
found himself but poorly backed up
by the chief executive.
It would not surprise some of the
knowing ones around the city hall
to see Sullivan throw up the job in
disgust almost any day. This last
attack, since the matron fight be
gan, has worried Sullivan a great
deal and his buoyant spirits of a
few weeks ago have faded away.
"Long John" is said to believe
that the head of the city govern
ment is playing politics and that he
—"Long John" —is to be made the
goat.
This does not take well with Sul
llvan, who believes that once a
stand is taken the game should be
played to a finish.
SULLIVAN DENIES IT.
"I certainly am not going to re
sign,'' declared Chief Sullivan this
morning. "I have not considered
resigning and haven't even dreamed
of it. Not for The Press or Davey
Coutes will I ever resign- put that
in the paper."
A FAMOUS POEM OF IRELAND.
I wear a shamrock in my heart.
Three in one, one in three—
Truth and love and faith,
Tears and pain and death;
O sweet my shamrock is to me!
| Lay me in my hollow bed,
Grow the shamrocks over me.
Three in one, one in three,
Faith and hope and charity,
Peace and rest and silence be
With me where you lay me dead:
O dear the shamrocks are to me!
—Hose Mulholland.
MANILA. March 16.—The
majority of medical men who
are delegates to the Fur Fast
era association medical confer
• enoe today stated that in their
opinion berl berl, the feared
disease which produces parat
■ ystS of the legs, has its origin
In the practice of polishing
rice.
By polishing the grains the
outer covering, which contains
• phosphorus, is removed.
SODAS AND SUNDAES SPRING STYLES SURPRISE,
ORDER ECSTA TIC EA TS IF YOU WOULD BE WISE
BY PARA DALTON.
Tin melting look of ladylike
bisque once more Is turned uppcul
ingly toward us. The chocolate dip
comes forward again to announce
she*s Just too sweet for anything.
And the restive soda Is all ready to
bubble over with—well, at least not
soap bark, for soap bark has gone
SPOKANE, WASHINGTON, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1910.
SIGHTS ROOSEVELT IS SEEING AT KHARTOUM
TOP PICTURE, AT RIGHT —GOVERNOR'S PA LACK, WHERE T. R. IS A GUEST. TOP, AT LEFT
—A SOUDANESE FAMILY. BELOW, AT RIGHT—A BEDOUIN SHEPHERD AND HIS FAMILY ON
HANKS OF THE NILE, NEAR KHARTOUM. ON LEFT, KHARTOUM MOSQUE, MADE WITH OHIO
SANDSTONE.
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
KHARTOUM. March 17.—C0!.
Roosevelt and his party bid fare
well to Khartoum at 9 o'clock to
night and on a special train will go
to Assouan, where the former pres
ident will spend a day. Mrs. Roose
velt, Miss Ethel, Kermit and a num
ber of correspondents formed the
party.
FRANCHISE
TERMS TO BE
DEBATED
LIVELY SPECIAL SESSION OF
THE CHAMBER OF COM
MERCE TONIGHT.
Great interest is centering itself
around the special meeting of the
chamber of commerce which will be
held tonight for the puri»ose of tak
ing action on the-terminal rate
franchise question, which was
brought tii> at the last meeting of
the chamber.
At the chamber of commerce
luncheon last Tuesday, a resolution
was Introduced commending the
council for its action in requiring
terminal rates from the North Coast
and .Milwaukee railroads before
granting them the desired fran
chises to come into Spokane.
Petitions have been circulated
commending the council for its ac
tion and there are many persons
who are free to condemn the city
fathers for what they have done
Many real estate men have signed
the petitions and many workers
the way of the old pipe organ foun
tain.
Hut the new spring drinks?
The new spring drinks are the
new spring eats. Who would sound
well informed on the DKSBBCIf and
custom: - of soda grilldom no longer
speaks in tonus of sodas. It's all
sundaes. The sundae is to the soda-
Co! ; Roosevelt's last day in Khar
toum .-was a busy one. During the
moruTqf scores of callers came to
bid liiflfj farewell. Among those
who sifted were members of the
hunting party.
Although Roosevelt will probably
see all of them except Cunning
hame, within a f< w months, he was '
visibly affected by the parting.
have asked the people not to sign
them.
Councilman Ostrander, who is re
sponsible for the amendment which
was passid by the council, says that
whjfn the load comes in it will oc
cupy' land valued at $4,000,000,
which is vow taxed by the city and
for which the railroad will only pay
the mileage tax.
It Is argued that the railroads
will have a steady force of 500 men
under their employ and that their
payroll will amount to $50,000
monthly.
FIGUIOIIP TO
BE DEPORTED
S. a Japanese laborer who
ha* ls(en in the county jail for as-
BSlult With a (badly weapon for the
past six months, is to be deported.
The njalt lias been In this country
lee's tjian three years and conies
withrnithe deportation limitation.
[flsMigrant Inspector A. F. Hich
ardsoij will take the man to Tacoma
Sunday morning.
ST PAUL, Minn., March 17.—
"ConaervCion of the national cap-1
ltal,"well us of national re- '
sources, was urged today by .lames
.1. HW. in an address before the '
JMlnnAota Conservation convention.
PresfeVnt Elliott of the Northern
Paclttl railway presided during the
moniipg session and President
Nerthhip of Minnesota university
during the afternoon.
'seutiflice what the Humbert case or
the Chudwick case is to a high
' finance sentence. No authority
would think of spoiling his rhetoric
by leaving either out.
"Tin sundae looks well and eats
Will —so. of course, it Ik high
p> hot," soda men smilingly ex
.! plain.
€ i ' *
The Press receives the full leased
wire report of the United Press.
The last semi-public appearance
of the former president occurred
this afternoon,.when he attended a
garden party at the Grand hotel.
Among the guests were a number of
officials of the British government
here and many of the most promi
nent residents of British East
Africa.
ODDS
AND
ENDS
LONDON, March 17—The praises
of Theodore Roosevelt are. being
sung tcday on every side. The ac
clamations of the press and the
people are the result of Roosevelt's
sntnuilsstlfl and unstinted praise of
the work Great Britain has done in
civilizing and upbuilding her Afri
caen possessions, particularly
Egypt and the Soudan.
Stephen Austin", a college gradu
ate, recently arretted charged with
burglary, says he became a burglar
'because there's action in it."
Only three more years of Taft.
T— aft
—alk
—ravel
—ariff
—lnkering
—rlbulatlo:
"BMB, ithni goin' tor be de fust
mail to shake de han oh de Hon.
T\ ddy Roosevelt," said a local col
ored man the other day.
'Hats! 'Cause why?"
" 'Cause— (yawn) — i don't want
to lose a chance to Ret dat sleeptn
atekneM. It sua h mus' be great to
do nothin' but sleep and have folks
stan' 'round an' wait on yuh."
WHY THE SUNDAE?
THERE'S A REASON.
And how did the sundae happen—
because it's too young to be listed
iv the dictionaries? This is what
the sundae men tell:
The girl up the street and the
man oh, very well, from some
(Continued on Page tlx.)
EIGHTH YEAR. No. 118. 10 CENTS PER WEEK.
DYING AS THE
DIRECT RESULT OF
STARVATION DIET
Thirty-Five Days on Bread and
Water Too Much for
S. 0. Chirm.
HIS TREATMENT DEVELOPED DIABETES
Up at the Deaconess hospital a man is dying today. Dying back
in a screened corner, fighting for the ever-shortening breaths, with a
ward full of weary wrecks, listening to the ever fainter gasp from
be hind the screen.
This man is dying because of Chief Sullivan's brutal system.
Somewhere out yonder, sometime, Sullivan will face the wan, worn
ghost of this man and answer; they say these latter.weeks Sullivan
has been failing, losing his grip, yearning to get away from it all. It
is no wonder; the wonder only is that he has stood the strain of hie
brutal prison reign so long.
S. O. Chirm is dying at the Deac
oness hospital. He is dying be-:
cause for 35 days he was given
notning but bread and water, and in
35 clays that diet brought diabetes
and certain death. When he went
to jail he was a well man. It
would have been more merciful to
Chirm to have clubbed him to death
in bis cell, the we eks of agony and
the final awful struggle would have
been saved him.
Oh, yes, Chirm was an I. W. W.;
he was also a man. For two years
Chirm has lived in Spokane. Those
who knew him best knew him to be |
"TAFT AND ST. PATRICK
THE BIGGEST MEN"
(By United Press Leased Wire)
CHICAGO, March 17.—The presi
dent's official St. Patrick's day be
gan somewhat like a Donnybrook
fair.
The slumbers of the president
were disturbed by a shindy between
Secret service men and a lineman
for a wireless telephone company.
The lineman insisted that he
should install a wireless telephone
in the president's car. The secret
service guards of the president
ruled otherwise. The lineman en
deavored to back up his argument
by waving a section of rubber hose
as a shillelah, but was speedily sub
dued by the government agents,
who possess Celtic names and
I Celtic blood.
JUST LISTEN TO THESE GEMS
FROM THE EMERALD ISLE
The following poems by well
known local composers are espec
ially suited to the day:
Ireland was Ireland when England
was a pup;
Ireland will be Ireland when Eng
land's all done up.
- Patrick O Shaughuessy.
The ludian with his pips of peace
will surely pass away;
But the Irishman with his piece of
pipe will last forever and
aye. —John O'Rourke.
TOASTS TO THE SHAMROCK.
Oh, Erin, fair emerald Isle of the
sea.
How long shall we sigh for thy
liberty?
The best we can do away over here
Is drink to her health in a
schooner of beer.
—Jiouule Durkln. j
THE INLANO^EMPIRB
PENNIES
Invested In Preee Want Ada
find tenants, Buyers and
help. Ada taken by phone at
no extra coat, Main 379.
I scrupulously, even fanatically, hon
est. He never drank, his personal
life was clean as his public life was
zealously devoted to what he
thought was the riglK thing.
Quite a considerable lot of boast
ing has been done by soft-speaking
"ministers" about the early Chris
tian martyrs, but no martyr of any
age died a harder death for a prin
ciple as he saw it than did Chirm,
I who is trying so hard out in the
hot ward on the hill to live until the
peaceful sundown.
Nowhere but In Spokane- under
(Continued on Page 2.)
When the president arrived at
the La Salle hotel be expressed
sympathy for the woman who had
dashed before his automobile. He
asked her name and was informed
that she gave the police the name
of Mrs. Jennie Mud, and her age
as 65.
I The president was told that she
, was being held pending an investl
: gation of her mental condition. She
told the police that "Taft and Bt.
I Patrick are the biggest men on
| earth and also that she wanted to
; ride on the front end of Tuft's auto
\ mobile. In the course of the day
Taft encountered a huge automo
; bile filled with militant suffrageta
j and bearing the sign, "No votes;
mo tax."
Oh, Erin, oh, Erin, so long in the
shade.
Thy star will shine out when the
brightest will fade;
So here's to old Erin, in shade or
in shine.
And to—stop it: I take no water In
mine. —Dr. P. S. Byrne.
Give me the land of the shamrock
green.
The land of the harp ho silent
> -seen;
Give me the stuff seven yean In
the wood.
This seventeenth day to me looks
so good. —Con Crowley.
Erin, the tear and the smile la
thine eyes
Blend like the rainbow that hangs
in the skies.
The ralubow be bunged, and the
tear with It, too;
The "smile"" is the thing far see
and for you.
| —Officer 4*Miaa.

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