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The Spokane press. [volume] (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, March 17, 1910, Image 1

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THE SPOKANE
A^mi^^^
ONE CENT IN CITY. ON TRAINS, FIVE CENTS.
LANGFORD WINS IN BTH ROUND
LANGFORD BREAKS
FLYNN'S JAW IN BTH
LOS ANGELES, Cal., March 17.—For the third time within a few
momnths "Beggar Sam" Langford and Jim Flynn, the Pueblo "Fighting
Fireman," scheduled to meet in the squared circle this afternoon. Thou
sands of enthusiastic fight bugs are crowding to the Vernon arena to
be in at the finish of either of the middleweights.
Langford is a hot favorite in the betting, few venturing to voice
their belief that the white man can overcome the negro over the
marathon.
in the first preliminary Al Rog
rrs beat Young Kenney in three
rounds. It was Rogers' fight all
'.he way. He beat Kenney in every
round and Referee make stopped
'.he unequal contest at the end of
the third. The boys fought at 133
pounds.
At 2:10 Kid Cleveland and
Frank ie Sullivan entered the
jing and were announced to box 10
/ounds at catch weights. George
Jtlake refereed this go.
Sullivan had all the better of
the first round, knocking Cleveland
flown with a right to the jaw.
In the second round Sullivan
soon bad Cleveland groggy by re
peated blows to the stomach and
jaw, the referee finally stopping
the bout toward the end of the
round. Cleveland was covered
with blood and had no chance.
The entire White Sox team No.
1, with Charley Comiskey, the Old
Roman of baseball, entered the pa
vilion at 2:2!3 and took seats near
the ringside.
FIGHTERS ENTER RING
At 2: r>r> p. in. Manager MeCarey
announced that the fight would go
on as soon as the fighters arrived
at the erena. The crowd had be
come impatient at the delay.
At U o'clock Langford entered
the ring, lie was accompanied by
Hob Armstrong and George Myers.
At 1108 Flynn entered the ring.
He was given a tremendous ova
lion. Flynn was seconded by Dick
Allen, King Hogan, Abdul the
Turk and Young Turk. Flynn was
in a happy mood and told several
of his friends near the ringside
that hi' was sure of being returned
a winner.
Langford had a sincere look and
anneared very cool.
Danny Webster was introduced
and it was announced that he
would meet Frankle Conley in the
Vernon arena some time in April,
the fight to be liT> rounds for the
bantamweight chamnlonshlp.
Warty Bloom was then introduced
and challenged any lightweight
on the coast. Ad Wolgaat pre
ferred.
Langford recognised Nat Good
w n among the spectators and
shouted:
"I am going after him today "
\t 3:10 the men posed for their
pictures,
Tom McCarev entered the ring
at 3:12 and shook hands with the
fighters. Then the men were call
ed into (lie center of tin 1 ring and
given their instructions by Referee
Charley Byton,
At 3:1.31-2 the men were sent
away.
FIGHT COMMENCES
Hound I, Tbfly shook hands and
Flynn forced a clinch. They fought
desperately In the center of the
ring. Langford hooked right to
Jaw. Then followed a fierce mix
''Punfaeh landing rights and lefts.
T.angfonl uppercut with right and
they clinched. Langford hooked
right to the Jaw and sent Flynn
staggering. Flynn came hack with
right to body, Langford hooUed
right to head. Flynn is bleeding
Madly. Langford sent right to jaw
and thej clinched, Flynn shows
Wall in Infighting, Langford land
ed hard light to the nose and hard
right hook to stomach. Langford
repeated to the body wltti right. It
was Langford's round. Flynn was
bleeding freely while Langford
was unmarked.
Hound 2. —Langford sent straight
left to nose and they clinched.
Flynn keeps boring in. Flyn lands
right to head and frocea Langford
to r '" ropes. Longford attempts to
lint Flynn down with right to jaw.
Flynn is fighting desperately but
Langford was the stronger. They
came to a clinch in the center of
the ring and Langford teaches
body with light right itrid left.
Flynn is wild It was a fierce
contest and Flynn WS| Jn trouble,
Langfoid'x round by a big margin
Round 3—They mine together
In the center of the ring and e\
change furious rights and h-fls
Langford sent Flynn down lor the
count. At th<> count of nine Flyßß
arose and was met with a ■■■. lie:-,
of rights and lefts Ho clinched
to ftyeWS :: knockout. Flynn tights
tjangfnrd to the rop<*s, b it iloej
no damage, Langford Jabbed
Flynu srltfa Jtft and a niouisnt
(By United Press Leased Wire.)
later staggers him with right
uppercut to jaw. Flynn is bleed
ing badly and seems very weak.
Langford sends right and left to
the jaw and tne bell saves Flynn.
ROUND 4—They sparred at the
opening and Langford shot left
twice to lace. Flynn is fighting
wildly and is cautioned by the ref
eree. Flynn smiles at the news
papermen over Langford's shoulder,
but it was a poor atiempt to appear
at ease. Langford sends left and
right to flu; face and laughs at
Flynn's wild attempts to return.
They butt each other in the center
of the ring. Flynn sen.ls right to
jaw, but his blows lack steam.
Langford sends three uppercuts to
the jaw in a clinch. Langford's
round. Flynn's face is badly cut
and the blood from his nose is cov
ering his chest, lie has a had cut
on the chin and his left eye was al
most closed.
Hound f>—They came to a clinch
in the center of the ring, and Flynn
reached the stomach with left and
right. Langford landed three hard
rights to the body and nearly
knocked Flynn over with right to
the kidneys, Flynn closed frequent
ly to avoid punishment, Langford
sends straight left to jaw and gets
away without a return. ■ Sam sent
haul uppercut to tin' jaw and they
clinched. Langford punished Flynn's
stomach and staggered him with
a left to the jaw. Flynn rushed
Sam to the I'Opes and reached the
stomach three times. Flynn was
staggering at the bell. Langford
was bleeding from the mouth.
Langford's round.
Round (!. —They Sparred at the
opening and Langford reached jaw
with right and followed it with
two rights to stomach. Sam
jabbed Flynn three times with his
left and a moment later swung
right haiti to the jaw Flynn put
left to Langford's eye. Sam
jabbed right to the body and
<<'lynn closed in and landed right
"to the stomach. In the Infighting
Langford sends three lefts to the
jaw. They fought viciously in the
center of the ring. Langford
Beems to have slowed up some
what. Even round.
Hound B»—They exchange lefts
and Flynn rushed Langford to the
ropes with left and rights to the
head, Flynn lands left to stom
ach and repeats to the jaw. Lang
ford sends straight left to stom
ach. Flynn bored in and sent
Langford to the ropes. Langford
signaled to Woodman that he was
all right. Langford knocked Flynn
dov, if "Villi hard left uppercut that
broke Flynn's jaw and was count
ed out while trying to rise from
his knees,
RUSTY NAIL
WON'T HURT HIM
LOS ANGELES, March 17 Hilly
Sullivan, veteran catcher of the
Chicago White Sox, is recovering
today from the effects of a second
operation performed last night at
the Elks' home. Sullivan stepped
on a rusty nail during practice here
last Saturday. Blood poisoning re
sul'ed and the doctors for a time
feared lie might lose his leg. Al
though his "improvement was satis
factory, it was deemed that another
operation was necessary.
It was stated that the athlete
probably be able to join the Sox
No I during their stay here, lie
will he out of the game, however,
for sonic time.
ALLEGE NEGLIGENCE
| In answer to the $:tlo damac-
SUlt of Clyde Wool-ird against tin
Diamond poo & Fuel company, the
fuel company filed * papers this
I morning alleging thai any accident
happening to Wools rd was on oc
count of his own negligence or that
of ills fellow servant, ii thing foi
'which the eompnn) Is not responsi
ble,
vVonlnl'd was working on a wood
HltW, ShOVing tile wood against ti;e>
jblmlf, at tin- time in- received l is
| in Jul Vts.
(By United Press Leased Wire)
BROTHER PHIL
RESEMBLES TERRY
PHIL McQOVERN.
Here's another McGovern,
brother of the famous Terry, who
made the name feared among little
fighters a few years ago, and
climbed to the highest round in the
1 ghtweight division.
Phil McGovern is a bantam and
is looked \ipon as one of the best
boys In the east. He is a stockily
built little chap and if he steers
wide of the path Terry trod, may
one day wear the bantam crown.
Tiff 10 PREVENT
FIREMEN'S STRIKE
(By United Press Leased Wire)
Chicago. March it. —Chairman
Knanii of tli" Interstate commerce
commission and Commissioner Nelll
of the labor commission, arrived
here today to attempt to prevent
the threatened strike of western
locomotive firemen and engineers.
Commissioner Neill announced
that all negotiations with the rail
way managers' committee and the
representatives of the brotherhood
would be secret.
TENT CAN STAND
L. A. Sehlesinger may continue
the sale of his damaged stock in a
tent at Hiversido avenue and Mon
roe streets, unmolested so fai as
the authorities are concerned.
This morning Judge \\". A. Hun
eke overruled the demurrer to the
writ of injunction secured by
Schlesinger last week, compelling
the authorities to permit b'm to
continue with the sale of g -oils
damaged in the Colfax Hood.
"Sam. ahm goln' ter be de fust
man to shako de ban ob de Hon.
Teddy Roosevelt," said a local col
ored man the other day.
"Kats! 'Cause why?"
" Cause—(yawn) —5 don't want
to lose a chance to Ret dat sleopln
si"kuess. It suah mus' he great to
do nothin' but sleep and have folks
si an' 'round an' wait on yuh."
"TAFT AND ST. PATRICK
THE BIGGEST MEN"
(By United Press Leased Wire)
CHICAGO, March IV.—The presi
dent's official St. Patrick's day be
gan somewhat like a Donnybrook
fair.
The slumbers of the president
w i re disturbed i>> n shindy between
secret service men and * lineman
for a wireless telephone company.
The lineman Insisted that he
should install a wireless telephone
In the president's car. The secret
service guards of tin president
ruled otherwise The lineman en
deavored to back tl|i hi:; argument
by waving a section of rubber hose
as a shilleluh. but was speed!!) sub
dued Uy the government agents,
who . i.ssoks Celtic names and
Celtic iiocd.
THE
NIGHT PINK
SPOKANE, WASHINGTON, THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1910.
FIGHTERS CONFIDENT
(By United Press Leased Wire)
LOS ANGELES, Cal., March 17.—Out at Jack Doyle's Ver
non training quarters Jim Flynn, the fighting fireman from
Pueblo, told exactly why he expected to vanquish Sam Lang
ford this afternoon while two rubbers kneaded his great shoulders
and worked with practiced hands up and down his spine.
"I am a bigger and stronger man than Ivangford," he said,
"and [ like to fight. I have a punch and 1 will take all Sam has
for one opportunity to land it. I havti beaten him once and I am
sure of repeating as 1 am of going into the ring today.
' I>angford can't hurt me, and I know I can hurt him. lam
in the best condition of my career. My first victory over him
gave me confidence for this fight. Langford hasn't the same
confidence that he will win.. Why shouldn't I win? Haven't 1
got the 'dope' on my side? That's just how ] feel, and this after
noon you'll see I am right."
Joe Woodman's "tar baby" from Boston was no whit less
sanguine of the result of the battle. At the Arcadia camp while
he rested after a short stroll before lunch he showed his teeth
in a wide Langford grin and remarked:
"I'm going into this fight to win just as quickly as possible.
That there is a possibility of losing, I- won't admit. My record in
the little book after today will show Jim Flynn's name after
mine in the parallel colum:/ with a 'k' in brackets beside it.
Then fofr Johnson if he wiif meet me. The fight public knows
what I can do and I am not going to disappoint them today."
Neither fighter did any work today. Flynn, after a session
with his rubbers, lolled around his camp, and Langford spent the
greater part of the morning in the opi?n air.
The betting was unchanged today, Langford ruling a strong
favorite with money being wagered at 2to 1 and 10 to 6. Few
lets were registered upon the number of rounds the
mill would go.
SULLIVAN
READY 10
QUIT JOB
LACK OF SUPPORT BY MAYOR
GIVEN AS THE CAUSE.
FEARS BECOMING GOAT
"Long John" Sullivan, chief of po
lice, is said to be ready to quit. His
reason is given as a lack of support
by the mayor. Sullivan has said, to
his intimate friends, that he made
scores of enemies since going into
office in order to aid the Pratt ad
ministration in a semblance of car
rying out its pledges. Now, when
the chief and the police department
are under fire, it is said that he has
found himself but poorly backed up
by the chief executive.
It would not surprise some of the
knowing ones around the city hall
to sec Sullivan throw up the job in
disgust almost any day. This last
attack, since the matron fight be
gan, has worried Sullivan a great
deal and his buoyant spirits of a
few weeks ago have faded away.
"Long John" is said to believe
that the head of the city govern
ment is playing politics and that he
—"Long John"—il to be made the
goat.
This does not take well with Sul
livan, who believes that once a
stand is taken the game should be
played to a finish.
SULLIVAN DENIES IT.
"I certainly am not going to re
sign," declared Chief Sullivan this
morning. "I have not considered
resigning and haven't even dreamed
of it. Xot for The Press or Davey
Coates will 1 ever resign—put that
in the paper."
When the president arrived at
the La Salle hotel he expressed
sympathy for the woman who had
dashed before his automobile. He
asked her name and was informed
that she gave the police the name
Of Mrs. Jennie Mud, and her age
us 65.
The president wan told that she
wast being held pending an investi
gation of h« r mental condition. She
told the police that "Taft and St.
Patrick are the biggest men on
earth and also that sin wanted to
rldC on the fo nl end of Taft's auto
mobile In the . >n,\-e of the (lay
Taft encountered i hue* automo
bile filled with t.ii .ti.i suifrraveUi
and boarll>| the sign, .'.o •.«•;.<>,;
nr. tu.t."
FRANCHISE
TERMS TO BE
i ■ DEBATED
LIVELY SPECIAL SESSION OF
THE CHAMBER OF COM
MERCE TONIGHT.
Great interest is centering itself
around the special meeting of the
chamber of commerce which will be
held tonight for the purpose of tak
ing action on the terminal rate
franchise question, which was
brought up at the last meeting of
the chamber.
At the chamber of commerce
luncheon last Tuesday, a resolution
was introduced commending the
council for its action in requiring
terminal rates from the North Coast
and Milwaukee railroads before
granting them the desired fran
chises to come into Spokane.
Petitions have been circulated
commending the council for its ac
tion and there are many persons
who are free to condemn the city
fathers for what they have done.
Many real estate men have signed
the petitions and many workers
LITTLE BOY MISSING
The 3-year-old son of Mrs. Rice,
who rssldes at W1217 Fourth ave
nue, disappeared from home this
morning and up until noon today
had not returned. Frantic over the
disappearance of the little fellow,
Mrs. Rice telephoned to police head
quarters to ascertain if anything
had been seen of her darling. Cap
tain Miles told her that the hoy was
not at the station, but that an effort
to locate him would be made.. Mrs.
Rice did not give the name of the
boy. She said he was dressed in
a blue sailor blouse and brown
knickerhockers, and that he is light
complexioned.
A FAMOUS POEM OF IRELAND.
I wear a shamrock in my heart.
Three in ene, one in three—
Truth and love and faith,
Tears and pain and death;
O sweet my shamrock is to me!
Lay me in my hollow bed,
Grow the shamrocks over me.
Three in one, one in three,
Faith and hope and charity,
Peace and rest and silence be
With me where you lay me dead:
O dear the shamrocks are to me!
—nose Mulholland.
SODAS AND SUNDAES SPRING STYLES SURPRISE,
ORDER ECSTA TIC EA TS IF YOU WOULD BE WISE
BY PARA DALTON.
The molting look of ladylike
bisque once more is turned appeal
ing!)' toward 119. The chocolate dip
comes forward again to announce
she's- J.i -1 too sweet Tor anything.
And the restive soda is all ready to
'.nibble over with —well, at least not
reap '.••: '•. for man bar!; ha.i gone
HE'S A BIG HIT
IN GAY PARIS
JOE JEANNETTE
Joe Jeannette is alleged to have
signed to meet Jack Johnson in
Paris after the big fuss July 4.
Jeannette is a splendid specimen
of physical manhood and has fur
nished the champion with many a
meal ticket in the past. Just how
much chance he has with Johnson
is open to discussion, but the two
will probably do well in the city
of the big water, where the fight
ing game thrives like melons in a
hothouse.
GREEN BEER
BE JABBERS!
There is at least one bar in
town today that is reminding
the thirsty that it is the Siven
teenth of March, God Rist His
Sowl.
This First avenue bar has
been dispensing green beer all
day and though several pa
triotic Irishmen have lingered
long at the tap to prevent any
A, P. A. visitors imbibing the
sacred fluid, the supply is still
holding out strong.
It is a regular beer, appar
ently it has not been colored
locally, it tastes like beer and
looks like paint, or rather like
the deep green waves in mid
ocean with the sun striking
them through.
Nobody but the bartender
knows how it happened, and he
won't tell, but all day he has
been drawing from one of the
regular faucets green beer, and
nobody has seen him dump in
any arsenic, though he has had
to tap several Hiberian kegs
during the ru6h.
FIGHTING JAP TO
BE DEPORTED
S. [kute, a Japanese laborer who
has been in the county jail for as
sault with a deadly weapon for tin
past six months, is to bo de|K>rted.
The man has boon in this country
less than three years and comes
within the deportation limitation.
Immigrant inspector a. f. Rich
ardson will take tin- man to Tacoina
Sunday morning.
ST PAUL, Minn, March IT.—
"Conservation of the national cap
ital," as well as of national re
sources, was urged today by James
J. Hill, in an address before the
Minnesota Conservation convention.
President Elliott of tin- Northern
Pacific railway presided during the
morning session and President
Northrup of Minnesota university
during the afternoon.
the way of the old pipe organ foun
tain.
Hut the new spring drinks?
The new miring drinks are the
new spring eats. Who would sound
well Informed on the manners and
customs of soda grllldom no longer
■peaks In terms of sodas. It's all
sundaes. The sundae Is to the soda
EIGHTH YEAR. No. 118. 10 CENTS PER WEEK.
DYING AS THE
DIRECT RESULT OF
STARVATION DIET
Thirty-Five Days on Bread and
Water Too Much for
S. 0. Chirm.
HIS TREATMENT DEVELOPED DIABETES
Up at the Deaconess hospital a man is dying today. Dying back
in a screened corner, fighting for the ever-shortening breaths, with a
ward full of weary wrecks, listening to the ever fainter gasp from
be hind the screen.
This man is dying because of Chief Sullivan's brutal system.
Somewhere out yonder, sometime, Sullivan will face the wan, worn
ghost of this man and answer; they say these latter weeks Sullivan
has been failing, losing his grip, yearning to get away from it all. It
is no wonder; the wonder only is that he has stood the strain of his
brutal prison reign so long.
S. O. Chirm is dying at the Deac
oness hospital. He is dying be
cause for 35 days he.was given
nothing but bread and water, and in
35 days that diet brought diabetes
and certain death. When he went
to jail he was a well man. It
would have been more merciful to
Chirm to have clubbed him to death
in his cell, the weeks of agony and
the final awful struggle would have
been saved him.
Oh, yes, Chirm was an I. W. W.;
he was also a man. For two years
Chirm has lived in Spokane. Those
who knew him best knew him to be
OSTRANDER FOR
REFERENDUM
BELIEVES FINAL DECISION OF
FRANCHISE CONTROVERSY
SHOULD REST WITH
PEOPLE.
"I suggest that the railroads
put the terminal rate question
up to a vote of all the people,"
said Councilman Ostrander to
day. "I am just as determined
as ever to force terminal rates
from the roads at this time. I,
however, believe in the 'peo
ple's rule,' and am willing that
the final word on this question
be by the people.
"The railways can secure a
special election on these fran
chises and I want them to do
so. I realize that the franchise
must come from the council to
be legal, but the roads can force
the council to grant the fran
chises by a referendum vote, as
was done by the Home Tele
phone Co. If a majority of the
people want to support the
roads we can find it out in this
way."
MANILA. March 16.—The
majority of medical men who
are delegates to the Far East
ern association medical confer
ence today stated that in their
opinion beri berl, the feared
disease which produces paral
ysis of the legs, has its origin
in the practice of polishing
rice.
Hy iwlishing the grains the
outer covering, which contains
• phosphorus, is removed.
Beuteaoa what the Humbert ease or
| the Chadwick-case is to a high
' finance sentence. No authority
would think of spoiling hta rhetoric
by leaving either out.
"The sundae looks well and eats
well—so, of course, it is high
priced." boda men smilingly ex
plain.
scrupulously, even fanatically, hon
est. He never drank, his personal
life was clean as his public life was*
zealously devoted to what bo
thought was the rigfn thing.
Quite a considerable lot o_f boast-,
ing has been done by soft-speaking
"ministers'' about the early Chris
tian martyrs, but no martyr of any
age died a harder death for a prin
ciple as he saw it than did Chirm,
who is trying so hard out in the
hot ward on the hill to live until the
peaceful sundown.
Nowhere but in Spokane nnder
(Continued on Page 2.)
LEGALITY
IS GRAVE
QUESTION
THE PRESS SECURES SEVERAL
VALUABLE INTERVIEWS.
RATES ARE TYRANNICAL
There is a divided sentiment
among the business men on the ad
visability of excluding the Milwau
kee and North Coast railroads until
they agree to grant terminal rates
in their franchises. Everybody
wants terminal rates, but the ques
tion is whether it is advisable to
hold a club over the new roads and
take chances of losing them in or
d«r to get it.
There is no hostile feeling against
the Milwaukee and the North Coast,
but there is feeling against the Hill
and Harriman systems, which are
responsible for the rate injuries so
long endured by Spokane. The ar
gument is offered that by holding
out against the North Coast and the
Milwaukee Spokane is playing into
the hands of the robber gang that
has held up the shippers of this city
for years.
The shipper* that Insist ou the
terminal rate clause say such an op
portunlty ah the present to secure
Continued on pags 2.
WHY THE SUNDAE?
THERE'S A REASON.
And how did timaunrifte. happ> ■» -
because It's too young to be listet)
in the dictkmaites? This is what
the sundae men tell:
The Kill up Iho stioet and (he
mhi r>li. very well, from some
{Continued on Paoe •In.) '

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